Allspice - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Allspice

The Experts below are selected from a list of 726 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Allspice – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Mendel Friedman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of Allspice cinnamon and clove bud essential oils in edible apple films on physical properties and antimicrobial activities
    Journal of Food Science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Carl W Olsen, Roberto J Avenabustillos, Tara H Mchugh, Carol Levin, Mendel Friedman

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT:  Essential oils (EOs) derived from plants are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria on contact and in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contamination by pathogenic bacteria. EOs from cinnamon, Allspice, and clove bud plants are compatible with the sensory characteristics of apple-based edible films. These films could extend product shelf life and reduce risk of pathogen growth on food surfaces. This study evaluated physical properties (water vapor permeability, color, tensile properties) and antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of Allspice, cinnamon, and clove bud oils in apple puree film-forming solutions formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: cinnamon oil > clove bud oil > Allspice oil. The antimicrobial films were more effective against L. monocytogenes than against the S. enterica. The oils reduced the viscosity of the apple solutions and increased elongation and darkened the colors of the films. They did not affect water vapor permeability. The results show that apple-based films with Allspice, cinnamon, or clove bud oils were active against 3 foodborne pathogens by both direct contact with the bacteria and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films.

  • Antibacterial Effects of Allspice, Garlic, and Oregano Essential Oils in Tomato Films Determined by Overlay and Vapor-Phase Methods
    Journal of food science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Carl W Olsen, Tara H Mchugh, Carol Levin, Roberto J. Avena-bustillos, Robert E. Mandrell, Mendel Friedman

    Abstract:

    Physical properties as well as antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of Allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils (EOs) in tomato puree film-forming solutions (TPFFS) formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated in this study. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor-phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The results indicate that the antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: oregano oil > Allspice oil > garlic oil. Listeria monocytogenes was less resistant to EO vapors, while E. coli O157:H7 was more resistant to EOs as determined by both overlay and vapor-phase diffusion tests. The presence of plant EO antimicrobials reduced the viscosity of TPFFS at the higher shear rates, but did not affect water vapor permeability of films. EOs increased elongation and darkened the color of films. The results of the present study show that the 3 plant-derived EOs can be used to prepare tomato-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films.

  • bactericidal activities of plant essential oils and some of their isolated constituents against campylobacter jejuni escherichia coli listeria monocytogenes and salmonella enterica
    Journal of Food Protection, 2002
    Co-Authors: Mendel Friedman, Philip R Henika, Robert E. Mandrell

    Abstract:

    An improved method of sample preparation was used in a microplate assay to evaluate the bactericidal activity levels of 96 essential oils and 23 oil compounds against Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica obtained from food and clinical sources. Bactericidal activity (BA50) was dee ned as the percentage of the sample in the assay mixture that resulted in a 50% decrease in CFU relative to a buffer control. Twenty-seven oils and 12 compounds were active against all four species of bacteria. The oils that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.009) were marigold, ginger root, jasmine, patchouli, gardenia, cedarwood, carrot seed, celery seed, mugwort, spikenard, and orange bitter oils; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.046 to 0.14) were oregano, thyme, cinnamon, palmarosa, bay leaf, clove bud, lemon grass, and Allspice oils; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.092) were gardenia, cedarwood, bay leaf, clove bud, oregano, cinnamon, Allspice, thyme, and patchouli oils; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.045 to 0.14) were thyme, oregano, cinnamon, clove bud, Allspice, bay leaf, palmarosa, and marjoram oils. The oil compounds that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.034) were cinnamaldehyde, estragole, carvacrol, benzaldehyde, citral, thymol, eugenol, perillaldehyde, carvone R, and geranyl acetate; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.28) were carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, citral, perillaldehyde, and estragole; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.019 to 0.43) were cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, citral, geraniol, perillaldehyde, carvone S, estragole, and salicylaldehyde; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.034 to 0.21) were thymol, cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, terpineol, perillaldehyde, and estragole. The possible signie cance of these results with regard to food microbiology is discussed.

Robert E. Mandrell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Antibacterial Effects of Allspice, Garlic, and Oregano Essential Oils in Tomato Films Determined by Overlay and Vapor-Phase Methods
    Journal of food science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Carl W Olsen, Tara H Mchugh, Carol Levin, Roberto J. Avena-bustillos, Robert E. Mandrell, Mendel Friedman

    Abstract:

    Physical properties as well as antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes of Allspice, garlic, and oregano essential oils (EOs) in tomato puree film-forming solutions (TPFFS) formulated into edible films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated in this study. Antimicrobial activities were determined by 2 independent methods: overlay of the film on top of the bacteria and vapor-phase diffusion of the antimicrobial from the film to the bacteria. The results indicate that the antimicrobial activities against the 3 pathogens were in the following order: oregano oil > Allspice oil > garlic oil. Listeria monocytogenes was less resistant to EO vapors, while E. coli O157:H7 was more resistant to EOs as determined by both overlay and vapor-phase diffusion tests. The presence of plant EO antimicrobials reduced the viscosity of TPFFS at the higher shear rates, but did not affect water vapor permeability of films. EOs increased elongation and darkened the color of films. The results of the present study show that the 3 plant-derived EOs can be used to prepare tomato-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by both direct contact and indirectly by vapors emanating from the films.

  • bactericidal activities of plant essential oils and some of their isolated constituents against campylobacter jejuni escherichia coli listeria monocytogenes and salmonella enterica
    Journal of Food Protection, 2002
    Co-Authors: Mendel Friedman, Philip R Henika, Robert E. Mandrell

    Abstract:

    An improved method of sample preparation was used in a microplate assay to evaluate the bactericidal activity levels of 96 essential oils and 23 oil compounds against Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica obtained from food and clinical sources. Bactericidal activity (BA50) was dee ned as the percentage of the sample in the assay mixture that resulted in a 50% decrease in CFU relative to a buffer control. Twenty-seven oils and 12 compounds were active against all four species of bacteria. The oils that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.009) were marigold, ginger root, jasmine, patchouli, gardenia, cedarwood, carrot seed, celery seed, mugwort, spikenard, and orange bitter oils; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.046 to 0.14) were oregano, thyme, cinnamon, palmarosa, bay leaf, clove bud, lemon grass, and Allspice oils; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.092) were gardenia, cedarwood, bay leaf, clove bud, oregano, cinnamon, Allspice, thyme, and patchouli oils; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.045 to 0.14) were thyme, oregano, cinnamon, clove bud, Allspice, bay leaf, palmarosa, and marjoram oils. The oil compounds that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.034) were cinnamaldehyde, estragole, carvacrol, benzaldehyde, citral, thymol, eugenol, perillaldehyde, carvone R, and geranyl acetate; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.28) were carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, citral, perillaldehyde, and estragole; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.019 to 0.43) were cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, citral, geraniol, perillaldehyde, carvone S, estragole, and salicylaldehyde; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.034 to 0.21) were thymol, cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, terpineol, perillaldehyde, and estragole. The possible signie cance of these results with regard to food microbiology is discussed.

  • bactericidal activities of plant essential oils and some of their isolated constituents against campylobacter jejuni escherichia coli listeria monocytogenes and salmonella enterica
    Journal of Food Protection, 2002
    Co-Authors: Mendel Friedman, Philip R Henika, Robert E. Mandrell

    Abstract:

    An improved method of sample preparation was used in a microplate assay to evaluate the bactericidal activity levels of 96 essential oils and 23 oil compounds against Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica obtained from food and clinical sources. Bactericidal activity (BA50) was dee ned as the percentage of the sample in the assay mixture that resulted in a 50% decrease in CFU relative to a buffer control. Twenty-seven oils and 12 compounds were active against all four species of bacteria. The oils that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.009) were marigold, ginger root, jasmine, patchouli, gardenia, cedarwood, carrot seed, celery seed, mugwort, spikenard, and orange bitter oils; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.046 to 0.14) were oregano, thyme, cinnamon, palmarosa, bay leaf, clove bud, lemon grass, and Allspice oils; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.092) were gardenia, cedarwood, bay leaf, clove bud, oregano, cinnamon, Allspice, thyme, and patchouli oils; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.045 to 0.14) were thyme, oregano, cinnamon, clove bud, Allspice, bay leaf, palmarosa, and marjoram oils. The oil compounds that were most active against C. jejuni (with BA50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.034) were cinnamaldehyde, estragole, carvacrol, benzaldehyde, citral, thymol, eugenol, perillaldehyde, carvone R, and geranyl acetate; those that were most active against E. coli (with BA50 values ranging from 0.057 to 0.28) were carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, citral, perillaldehyde, and estragole; those that were most active against L. monocytogenes (with BA50 values ranging from 0.019 to 0.43) were cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, citral, geraniol, perillaldehyde, carvone S, estragole, and salicylaldehyde; and those that were most active against S. enterica (with BA50 values ranging from 0.034 to 0.21) were thymol, cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, eugenol, salicylaldehyde, geraniol, isoeugenol, terpineol, perillaldehyde, and estragole. The possible signie cance of these results with regard to food microbiology is discussed.

C Pérez-alonso – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Supercritical Extraction Process of Allspice Essential Oil
    Hindawi Limited, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yasvet Y. Andrade-avila, C Pérez-alonso, Ciro Humberto Ortiz-estrada, Julian Cruz-olivares, María Del Carmen Chaparro Mercado

    Abstract:

    Allspice essential oil was extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) in a static process at three different temperatures (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K) and four levels of pressure (100, 200, 300, and 360 bar). The amount of oil extracted was measured at intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h; the most extraction yield reached was of 68.47% at 318.15 K, 360 bar, and 6 h of contact time. In this supercritical extraction process, the distribution coefficient (KD), the mean effective diffusion coefficient (Def), the energy of activation (Ea), the thermodynamic properties (ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0), and the apparent solubility (S) expressed as mass fraction (w/w) were evaluated for the first time. At the equilibrium the experimental apparent solubility data were successfully correlated with the modified Chrastil equation

  • Supercritical Extraction Process of Allspice Essential Oil
    Journal of Chemistry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yasvet Y. Andrade-avila, J Cruz-olivares, C Pérez-alonso, Ciro Humberto Ortiz-estrada, M.c. Chaparro-mercado

    Abstract:

    Allspice essential oil was extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) in a static process at three different temperatures (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K) and four levels of pressure (100, 200, 300, and 360 bar). The amount of oil extracted was measured at intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h; the most extraction yield reached was of 68.47% at 318.15 K, 360 bar, and 6 h of contact time. In this supercritical extraction process, the distribution coefficient ( ), the mean effective diffusion coefficient ( ), the energy of activation ( ), the thermodynamic properties ( , , and ), and the apparent solubility ( ) expressed as mass fraction (w/w) were evaluated for the first time. At the equilibrium the experimental apparent solubility data were successfully correlated with the modified Chrastil equation.

  • Modeling of lead (II) biosorption by residue of Allspice in a fixed-bed column
    Chemical Engineering Journal, 2013
    Co-Authors: J Cruz-olivares, Carlos Barrera-díaz, Fernando Ureña-núñez, C Pérez-alonso, M.c. Chaparro-mercado, Bryan Bilyeu

    Abstract:

    Residue of Allspice (Pimenta dioica L. Merrill) obtained as a by-product from the essential oil supercritical extraction process, has been evaluated as a biosorbent for removing lead (II) from aqueous solutions in batch studies, but not in a practical system like a fixed bed column [12,13]. In this paper, the effects of flow rate (20 and 40 mL/min), bed depth (8 and 15 cm) and influent lead concentration (15 and 25 mg/L) on the adsorption capacity of the residue of Allspice in a fixed-bed column were investigated. The highest adsorption capacity (99.2%) on a 15 mg/L Pb(II) solution was achieved within a flow rate of 20 mL/min and a bed depth of 15 cm. The experimental data obtained from the adsorption process was successfully correlated with the Thomas, Adams–Bohart, Yoon–Nelson, Bed Depth Service Time (BDST), and Dose Response models. A rigorous model based on the differential balance mass transfer was also used to describe the adsorption process in the column. The results of the parameters zone mass transfer, diffusion and mass transfer coefficients obtained with modeling the continuous process could be applied to scale up the process to an actual industrial column.