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Peter P Marra – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ARTICLE Relationships
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Matthew M. Osmond, Peter P Marra, Matthew W Reudink, Peter T Boag, Ryan R. Germain, Joseph J. Nocera, Laurene M Ratcliffe
    Abstract:

    between carotenoid-based female plumage and age, reproduction, and mate colour in the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla

  • Winter habitat quality but not long-distance dispersal influences apparent reproductive success in a migratory bird.
    Ecology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Clark S. Rushing, Peter P Marra, Michele R. Dudash
    Abstract:

    Long-distance breeding and natal dispersal play central roles in many ecological and evolutionary processes, including gene flow, population dynamics, range expansion, and individual responses to fluctuating biotic and abiotic conditions. However, the relative contribution of long-distance dispersal to these processes depends on the ability of dispersing individuals to successfully reproduce in their new environment. Unfortunately, due to the difficulties associated with tracking dispersal in the field, relatively little is known about its reproductive consequences. Furthermore, because reproductive success is influenced by a variety of processes, disentangling the influence of each of these processes is critical to understanding the direct consequences of dispersal. In this study, we used stable hydrogen and carbon isotopes to estimate long-distance dispersal and winter territory quality in a migratory bird, the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla). We then applied Aster life-history models to quantify the strength of influence of these factors on apparent reproductive success. We found no evidence that male or female reproductive success was lower for long-distance dispersers relative to non-dispersing individuals. In contrast, carry-over effects from the winter season did influence male, but not female, reproductive success. Use of Aster models further revealed that for adult males, winter territory quality influenced the number of offspring produced whereas for yearling males, high-quality winter territories were associated with higher mating and nesting success. These results suggest that although long-distance natal and breeding dispersal carry no immediate reproductive cost for American Redstarts, reproductive success in this species may ultimately be limited by the quality of winter habitat.

  • Habitat and body condition influence American Redstart foraging behavior during the non-breeding season
    Journal of Field Ornithology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luke L. Powell, Robert C. Dobbs, Peter P Marra
    Abstract:

    Insectivorous birds may adjust their foraging strategies to exploit changes in resource distributions. Arthropod prey strongly influence habitat-specific persistence of long-distance migrant passerines in their wintering areas, and arthropods are strongly affected by rainfall. However, the effect of drought on the dynamics of avian foraging ecology as resources shift is not well understood. We captured female American Redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla) and studied their foraging behavior in high-quality (evergreen black mangrove) and low-quality (deciduous scrub) habitat in Jamaica during the winter of 1995–1996. As is typical in southwestern Jamaica, conditions became drier as spring approached and many trees in scrub lost most of their leaves; mangrove trees maintained most of their leaf cover. Birds in scrub lost more mass than those in mangrove, and scrub birds shifted to using more aerial (and fewer near-perch) maneuvers. In scrub, but not in mangrove, the proportion of wing-powered movements and aerial foraging maneuvers was positively correlated with mass corrected by body size. In both habitats, attack rate was negatively correlated with body condition. Therefore, Redstarts in scrub that maintained body condition were likely better able to use energetically expensive aerial maneuvers and wing-powered search movements to exploit large, calorie-rich flying arthropods. As the scrub dried over the course of the winter, the shift in foraging tactic may have allowed some birds to forage more efficiently (i.e., lower attack rate), likely facilitating maintenance of good body condition. RESUMEN El habitat y la condicion corporal influye sobre la conducta de forrajeo de Setophaga ruticilla durante el periodo no-reproductivo Las aves insectivoras pueden ajustar sus estrategias de forrajeo para explotar los cambios que puedan ocurrir en la distribucion de recursos. La disponibilidad de artropodos utilizados como presas, en donde la presencia y cantidad de estos puede ser afectada por las lluvias, influye grandemente sobre la persistencia de paserinos migratorios invernales, que vuelan largas distancias, a habitats especificos invernales. Sin embargo, el efecto de sequias y la dinamica de la ecologia de forrajeo, en habitats diferentes, con referencia a cambios en la disponibilidad de recursos no es del todo bien entendido. Capturamos hembras de la Reinita candelita (Setophaga ruticilla), y estudiamos su conducta de forrajeo en un habitat de alta calidad (mangle negro) y un habitat pobre (matorral deciduo) durante el invierno del 1995–1996 en Jamaica. Como es tipico del suroeste de Jamaica, las condiciones fueron mas secas segun se acerco la primavera y muchos arboles y arbustos perdieron las hojas, pero el mangle negro mantuvo gran parte de su follaje. Las aves en el matorral perdieron mas masa que las aves en el manglar y hubo un cambio en utilizar mas capturas a vuelos que alimentarse en perchas. En el matorral, pero no asi en el mangle, la proporcion de movimientos propulsados por las alas y uso de forrajeo por aire, estuvo correlacionado positivamente con el tamano del cuerpo. En ambos habitats, la tasa de ataque aereo estuvo negativamente correlacionada con la condicion corporal. Por tanto, las reinitas en habitat de matorral que pudieron mantener su condicion corporal fueron mas propensas a utilizar forrajeo aereo, de mayor gasto energetico, y a utilizar artropodos voladores de gran valor calorico. Segun fue secandose el matorral a lo largo del invierno, el cambio en tacticas de forrajeo, puede haberle permitido a algunas aves a forrajear de forma mas eficiente (ej. una tasa menor de ataques aereos), facilitando el mantenimiento de una buena condicion corporal.

Laurene M Ratcliffe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ARTICLE Relationships
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Matthew M. Osmond, Peter P Marra, Matthew W Reudink, Peter T Boag, Ryan R. Germain, Joseph J. Nocera, Laurene M Ratcliffe
    Abstract:

    between carotenoid-based female plumage and age, reproduction, and mate colour in the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla

  • age related change in carotenoid based plumage of the American Redstart setophaga ruticilla
    Journal of Ornithology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Kristen L D Marini, Peter P Marra, Laurene M Ratcliffe, Ann E. Mckellar, Matthew W Reudink
    Abstract:

    Plumage colouration serves a variety of functions for birds, including conspecific signalling, crypsis, and predator–prey interactions. Though much research has been conducted on colour changes in species with delayed plumage maturation, where birds do not exhibit definitive adult plumage until their second breeding season or later, relatively few studies have examined how plumage colour changes once definitive adult plumage has been attained. In this study on male and female American Redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla), which exhibit male delayed plumage maturation, we used reflectance spectrometry to evaluate carotenoid-based tail colour changes over 11 breeding seasons, examining both within-individual and population-level changes. At a population level, males in their first breeding season in definitive adult plumage had a feather hue that was more orange-shifted than birds in their second year in adult plumage, and marginally, but not significantly, more orange-shifted than birds in their third year in adult plumage. Within-individual analysis of males recaptured in subsequent seasons also revealed a shift away from orange towards a more yellow feather hue as individuals aged. Within individuals, red chroma was highest for males in their second year in adult plumage, but it showed no population-level effects. At the population level, female Redstarts in their first breeding season displayed plumage with a higher red chroma and a lower brightness than birds in their second breeding season, potentially as a result of differences in the timing and conditions of moult (first-year bird tail feathers were grown in the nest). For adult males and females, there was no difference in plumage colouration between birds that returned to the study site compared to those that failed to return. Together, our results suggest that within-individual change rather than differential survival best explains our findings. We suggest that studies examining age-related colour changes are critical for understanding the evolution of complex signalling systems, such as that of American Redstarts.

  • Inter-annual variation in American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) plumage colour is associated with rainfall and temperature during moult: an 11-year study.
    Oecologia, 2014
    Co-Authors: Matthew W Reudink, Peter P Marra, Ann E. Mckellar, Kristen L D Marini, Sarah L. Mcarthur, Laurene M Ratcliffe
    Abstract:

    Carotenoid-based colouration plays an important role in sexual signaling in animals as an honest indicator of individual quality during mate choice and competitive interactions. However, few studies have examined how natural variation in weather conditions influences inter-annual variation in the expression of ornamentation, potentially through affecting the dietary availability of carotenoids. In this study, we examine variation in the expression of carotenoid-based plumage colouration in relation to temperature and rainfall during the pre-moulting and moulting period over 11 years in a population of American Redstarts, Setophaga ruticilla, breeding in eastern Canada. We used reflectance spectrometry of tail feathers collected from male and female Redstarts to relate feather colour with weather conditions the previous breeding season during the months over which Redstarts are likely to moult (June–September). At a population level, birds expressed feathers with higher red chroma and lower brightness in years following high July rainfall and low August temperature. The pattern was stronger in males, but was generally consistent across ages and sexes. Analyses of feathers from repeatedly captured birds indicated that the above patterns could be explained by individual change in feather colour. We suggest that higher rainfall during the moulting period may increase insect abundance and the availability of dietary carotenoids. This is among the first studies to show effects of weather conditions on a sexual signalling trait, which may have important consequences for sexual selection, mate choice, and the reliability of putative signals.

Thomas W. Sherry – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sherry et al annual covariate data
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas W. Sherry, Scott Wilson, Sarah Hunter, Richard T. Holmes
    Abstract:

    Text file containing annual covariates (1983-1995) for analyzing American Redstart nesting success in Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA. Besides year, covariates in file include Redstart population density, predator index, May temperature, May rainfall, June temperature, June rainfall

  • Sherry et al nest survival data
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas W. Sherry, Scott Wilson, Sarah Hunter, Richard T. Holmes
    Abstract:

    Text file containing nest survival data for American Redstart in MARK format for the years 1983-1995, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA. Covariates (besides nest year and ID number) are date found, date nest last alive, date nest last checked, nest fate, encounter history, nest height above ground, nest status as to whether baffled against scansorial predators or not, nest tree DBH, and age status of nest

  • Combining survey methods to estimate abundance and transience of migratory birds among tropical nonbreeding habitats
    The Auk, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ashley M. Peele, Peter M. Marra, T. Scott Sillett, Thomas W. Sherry
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Estimating population abundance for territorial species is challenging because individuals often differ in behavior (e.g., transience, multiterritoriality), and thus in detectability. How well prevailing methods detect and quantify individuals using multiple strategies is rarely addressed. In our effort to efficiently quantify avian abundance and transience among diverse nonbreeding habitats, we combined ‘unmarked’ (distance sampling) with traditional ‘marked’ (territory mapping) survey methods using a migratory passerine, the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla), wintering in 3 habitats in Jamaica from 2010 to 2012. We predicted that the ‘unmarked’ survey method would detect not only all known (marked) territorial individuals, but also individuals that were transient or nonterritorial in the same habitats. Comparisons of abundance estimates generated by our best distance sampling (unmarked) model with territory mapping data identified high proportions of transient individuals (up to 50%) in 2…

Richard T. Holmes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sherry et al annual covariate data
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas W. Sherry, Scott Wilson, Sarah Hunter, Richard T. Holmes
    Abstract:

    Text file containing annual covariates (1983-1995) for analyzing American Redstart nesting success in Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA. Besides year, covariates in file include Redstart population density, predator index, May temperature, May rainfall, June temperature, June rainfall

  • Sherry et al nest survival data
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas W. Sherry, Scott Wilson, Sarah Hunter, Richard T. Holmes
    Abstract:

    Text file containing nest survival data for American Redstart in MARK format for the years 1983-1995, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA. Covariates (besides nest year and ID number) are date found, date nest last alive, date nest last checked, nest fate, encounter history, nest height above ground, nest status as to whether baffled against scansorial predators or not, nest tree DBH, and age status of nest

  • Assessing habitat quality for a migratory songbird wintering in natural and agricultural habitats
    Conservation Biology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Matthew D. Johnson, Thomas W. Sherry, Richard T. Holmes, Peter P Marra
    Abstract:

    As tropical forests are cleared, a greater proportion of migratory songbirds are forced to winter in agricultural and disturbed habitats, which, if poorer in quality than natural forests, could contribute to population declines. We compared demographic indicators of habitat quality for a focal species, the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla), wintering in Jamaican citrus orchards and shade coffee plantations with those in four natural habitats: mangrove, coastal scrub, coastal palm, and dry limestone forests. Demographic measures of habitat quality included density, age and sex ratio, apparent survival, and changes in body mass. Measures of habitat quality for Redstarts in citrus and coffee habitats were generally intermediate between the highest (mangrove) and lowest (dry limestone) measurements from natural habitats. The decline in mean body mass over the winter period was a strong predictor of annual survival rate among habitats, and we suggest that measures of body condition coupled with survival data provide the best measures of habitat quality for nonbreeding songbirds. Density, which is far easier to estimate, was correlated with these more labor-intensive measures, particularly in the late winter when food is likely most limiting. Thus, local density may be useful as an approximation of habitat quality for wintering migrant warblers. Our findings bolster those of previous studies based on bird abundance that suggest arboreal agricultural habitats in the tropics can be useful for the conservation of generalist, insectivorous birds, including many migratory passerines such as Redstarts.

Marra, Peter P. – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Strength of Migratory Connectivity for Birds En Route to Breeding Through the Gulf of Mexico
    'Wiley', 2019
    Co-Authors: Cohen, Emily B., Moore, Frank R., Rushing, Clark R., Hallworth, Michael T., Hostetler, Jeffrey A., Ramirez, Mariamar Gutierrez, Marra, Peter P.
    Abstract:

    The strength of migratory connectivity is a measure of the cohesion of populations among phases of the annual cycle, including breeding, migration, and wintering. Many Nearctic‐Neotropical species have strong migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering phases of the annual cycle. It is less clear if this strength persists during migration when multiple endogenous and exogenous factors may decrease the cohesion of populations among routes or through time along the same routes. We sampled three bird species, American Redstart Setophaga ruticilla, ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla, and wood thrush Hylocichla mustelina, during spring migration through the Gulf of Mexico region to test if breeding populations differentiate spatially among migration routes or temporally along the same migration routes and the extent to which within‐population timing is a function of sex, age, and carry‐over from winter habitat, as measured by stable carbon isotope values in claws (δ13C). To make quantitative comparisons of migratory connectivity possible, we developed and used new methodology to estimate the strength of migratory connectivity (MC) from probabilistic origin assignments identified using stable hydrogen isotopes in feathers (δ2H). We found support for spatial differentiation among routes by American Redstarts and ovenbirds and temporal differentiation along routes by American Redstarts. After controlling for breeding origin, the timing of American Redstart migration differed among ages and sexes and ovenbird migration timing was influenced by carry‐over from winter habitat. The strength of migratory connectivity did not differ among the three species, with each showing weak breeding‐to‐spring migration MC relative to prior assessments of breeding‐wintering connectivity. Our work begins to fill an essential gap in methodology and understanding of the extent to which populations remain together during migration, information critical for a full annual cycle perspective on the population dynamics and conservation of migratory animals

  • Data from: Extra-pair offspring are less heterozygous than within-pair offspring in American Redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla)
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Hajdasz Adrianne, Marra, Peter P., Mckellar, Ann E., Ratcliffe, Laurene M., Boag, Peter T., Reudink, Matthew W.
    Abstract:

    The vast majority of bird species are socially monogamous; however, extra-pair paternity is nearly ubiquitous and a number of theories have been proposed to explain the prevalence of this mixed mating strategy. Here, we test the genetic compatibility hypothesis—the idea that females that are genetically similar to their social partners will mate with extra-pair males that are genetically dissimilar to produce offspring that are more heterozygous. For this study, we examined eight years of paternity data (2004-2011) from a Nearctic-Neotropical migratory bird, the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla), breeding in southeastern Ontario, Canada. We predicted that females paired with genetically similar males (higher relatedness) would be more likely to produce extra-pair offspring and that extra-pair offspring would have higher levels of heterozygosity than within-pair offspring. Alternatively, because this population experiences high levels of immigration, females may produce extra-pair offspring with more genetically similar males because of the potential for outbreeding depression. Using five highly variable microsatellite markers, we examined patterns of relatedness among social pairs as well as measures of offspring heterozygosity. In contrast to our predictions, we found no difference in relatedness between social pairs where the females produced extra-pair offspring and social pairs where the females produced only within-pair offspring. However, extra-pair offspring were significantly less heterozygous than within-pair offspring. Together, these findings suggest that females a) are not engaging in extra-pair fertilizations based on relatedness to their social mate and b) appear to be mating with extra-pair males that are more genetically similar to themselves. We suggest there may be benefits for females to mate with genetically similar extra-pair males in highly outbred populations with high rates of immigration, such as for maintaining co-adapted gene complexes or genes coding for local adaptations

  • Data from: The strength of migratory connectivity for birds en route to breeding through the Gulf of Mexico
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Cohen, Emily B., Moore, Frank R., Rushing, Clark R., Hallworth, Michael T., Hostetler, Jeffrey A., Ramirez, Mariamar Gutierrez, Marra, Peter P.
    Abstract:

    The strength of migratory connectivity is a measure of the cohesion of populations among phases of the annual cycle, including breeding, migration, and wintering. Many Nearctic-Neotropical species have strong migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering phases of the annual cycle. It is less clear if this strength persists during migration when multiple endogenous and exogenous factors may decrease the cohesion of populations among routes or through time along the same routes. We sampled three bird species, American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla), ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), and wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), during spring migration through the Gulf of Mexico region to test if breeding populations differentiate spatially among migration routes or temporally along the same migration routes and the extent to which within-population timing is a function of sex, age, and carry-over from winter habitat, as measured by stable carbon isotope values in claws (δ13C). To make quantitative comparisons of migratory connectivity possible, we developed and used new methodology to estimate the strength of migratory connectivity (MC) from probabilistic origin assignments identified using stable hydrogen isotopes in feathers (δ2H). We found support for spatial differentiation among routes by American Redstarts and ovenbirds and temporal differentiation along routes by American Redstarts. After controlling for breeding origin, the timing of American Redstart migration differed among ages and sexes and ovenbird migration timing was influenced by carry-over from winter habitat. The strength of migratory connectivity did not differ among the three species, with each showing weak breeding-to-spring migration MC relative to prior assessments of breeding-wintering connectivity. Our work begins to fill an essential gap in methodology and understanding of the extent to which populations remain together during migration, information critical for a full annual cycle perspective on the population dynamics and conservation of migratory animals