Angelica Root - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Angelica Root

The Experts below are selected from a list of 462 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Angelica Root – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Hiroshi Watanabe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of Methylenechloride-Soluble Fraction of Japanese Angelica Root Extract, Ligustilide and Butylidenephthalide, on Pentobarbital Sleep in Group-Housed and Socially Isolated Mice
    Life sciences, 1998
    Co-Authors: Kinzo Matsumoto, Shin-ichi Kohno, Yasuhiro Tezuka, Shigetoshi Kadota, Kazuma Qjima, Hiroshi Watanabe
    Abstract:

    We previously showed that the extract of Japanese Angelica Root (JAR-E) reversed the decrease in pentobarbital (PB) sleep induced by isolation stress and yohimbine and methoxamine, stimulants of central noradrenergic systems, in mice. Here, we tested the effects of several fractions from JAR-E and ligustilide and butylidenephthalide, phthalide components of JAR-E, on PB sleep in isolated mice to elucidate the mechanism of the action of JAR-E. Methanol-soluble (Met-S) and -insoluble (Met-IS) fractions were obtained from JAR-E. Methylenechloride-soluble (MC-S) and -insoluble fractions (MC-IS) were prepared from Met-S. MC-S (11.4-76 mg/kg, p.o.) reversed the isolation stress-induced decrease in PB sleep, but neither Met-IS (0.8-2.4 g/kg, p.o.) nor MC-IS (0.7-2 g/kg, p.o.) had the same effect. The i.p. administration of MC-S exhibited a similar activity to that observed after the p.o. administration of the same fraction. Ligustilide (5-20 mg/kg, i.p.) and butylidenephthalide (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed PB sleep decrease in isolated mice. Both components (20 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the suppressive effects of yohimbine (30 nmol, i.c.v.), methoxamine (200 nmol, i.c.v.) and a benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) on PB sleep in group-housed mice. These results suggest the contribution of ligustilide and butylidenephthalide to the effect of JAR-E on PB sleep in isolated mice, and implicate central noradrenergic and/or GABA(A) systems in the effects of these components.

  • candidates for cognitive enhancer extracted from medicinal plants paeoniflorin and tetramethylpyrazine
    Behavioural Brain Research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Watanabe
    Abstract:

    A traditional Chinese medicine, Shimotsu-to, consisting of four herbs: Japanese Angelica Root, cnidium rhizome, peony Root and rehmannia Root, has been reported to improve spatial working memory in rats. The present results indicate that Paeoniflorin and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) extracted from peony Root and cnidium rhizome, respectively, are candidates for cognitive enhancer.

  • Effect of Japanese Angelica Root Extract on Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep in Group-Housed and Socially Isolated Mice:Evidence for the Central Action
    Japanese journal of pharmacology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Kinzo Matsumoto, Shin-ichi Kohno, Yasuhiro Tezuka, Shigetoshi Kadota, Hiroshi Watanabe
    Abstract:

    We investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Japanese Angelica Root (JAR) on pentobarbital (PB) sleep in group-housed and socially isolated mice. The JAR extract (1.25-2.5 g/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently reversed the decrease in PB sleep caused by isolation stress without affecting PB sleep in group-housed mice. The JAR extract (2.5 g/kg, p.o.) also antagonized the decrease in PB sleep caused by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine and idazoxan (1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine (200 nmol, i.c.v.) in group-housed mice. These results suggest that the JAR extract reverses changes in the arousal level caused by isolation stress and the activation of central noradrenergic systems.

Kinzo Matsumoto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of Methylenechloride-Soluble Fraction of Japanese Angelica Root Extract, Ligustilide and Butylidenephthalide, on Pentobarbital Sleep in Group-Housed and Socially Isolated Mice
    Life sciences, 1998
    Co-Authors: Kinzo Matsumoto, Shin-ichi Kohno, Yasuhiro Tezuka, Shigetoshi Kadota, Kazuma Qjima, Hiroshi Watanabe
    Abstract:

    We previously showed that the extract of Japanese Angelica Root (JAR-E) reversed the decrease in pentobarbital (PB) sleep induced by isolation stress and yohimbine and methoxamine, stimulants of central noradrenergic systems, in mice. Here, we tested the effects of several fractions from JAR-E and ligustilide and butylidenephthalide, phthalide components of JAR-E, on PB sleep in isolated mice to elucidate the mechanism of the action of JAR-E. Methanol-soluble (Met-S) and -insoluble (Met-IS) fractions were obtained from JAR-E. Methylenechloride-soluble (MC-S) and -insoluble fractions (MC-IS) were prepared from Met-S. MC-S (11.4-76 mg/kg, p.o.) reversed the isolation stress-induced decrease in PB sleep, but neither Met-IS (0.8-2.4 g/kg, p.o.) nor MC-IS (0.7-2 g/kg, p.o.) had the same effect. The i.p. administration of MC-S exhibited a similar activity to that observed after the p.o. administration of the same fraction. Ligustilide (5-20 mg/kg, i.p.) and butylidenephthalide (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed PB sleep decrease in isolated mice. Both components (20 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the suppressive effects of yohimbine (30 nmol, i.c.v.), methoxamine (200 nmol, i.c.v.) and a benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) on PB sleep in group-housed mice. These results suggest the contribution of ligustilide and butylidenephthalide to the effect of JAR-E on PB sleep in isolated mice, and implicate central noradrenergic and/or GABA(A) systems in the effects of these components.

  • Effect of Japanese Angelica Root Extract on Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep in Group-Housed and Socially Isolated Mice:Evidence for the Central Action
    Japanese journal of pharmacology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Kinzo Matsumoto, Shin-ichi Kohno, Yasuhiro Tezuka, Shigetoshi Kadota, Hiroshi Watanabe
    Abstract:

    We investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Japanese Angelica Root (JAR) on pentobarbital (PB) sleep in group-housed and socially isolated mice. The JAR extract (1.25-2.5 g/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently reversed the decrease in PB sleep caused by isolation stress without affecting PB sleep in group-housed mice. The JAR extract (2.5 g/kg, p.o.) also antagonized the decrease in PB sleep caused by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine and idazoxan (1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine (200 nmol, i.c.v.) in group-housed mice. These results suggest that the JAR extract reverses changes in the arousal level caused by isolation stress and the activation of central noradrenergic systems.

  • Peony and its major constituent, paeoniflorin, improved radial maze performance impaired by scopolamine in rats
    Pharmacology biochemistry and behavior, 1993
    Co-Authors: Hiroyuki Ohta, Hiroshi Watanabe, Kinzo Matsumoto, Mineo Shimizu
    Abstract:

    A traditional Chinese medicine, Shimotsu-to has been shown to improve spatial working memory in rats. Shimotsu-to consists of four herbs, Japanese Angelica Root, cnidium rhizome, peony Root, and rehmannia Root. In the present study, the effects of aqueous extracts of each component herb on scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg)-induced spatial working memory disruption were examined using an eight-arm radical maze task in rats. Among the four component herbs, peony Root extract (0.25 and 1 g dried herb/kg, PO) exhibited the most potent antagonizing effect on the scopolamine disruption of the choice accuracy. Japanese Angelica Root extract (1 g dried herb/kg, PO) also significantly attenuated the scopolamine disruption, whereas neither cnidium rhizome nor rehmannia Root affected it. Paeoniflorin (0.01-1 mg/kg, PO), a major constituent of peony Root, dose-dependently attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment in the choice accuracy. Scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, IP) significantly decreased the acetylcholine contents in the hippocampus, cortex, and striatum. Although paeoniflorin alone did not affect the acetylcholine contents, pretreatment with paeoniflorin significantly prevented the scopolamine-induced decrease in the acetylcholine content in the striatum, but not in the hippocampus or cortex. These data suggest that peony Root mainly contributes to the cognitive enhancing effect of Shimotsu-to and that paeoniflorin may be one of the active constituents of peony Root.

Anne Rühl – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Region-specific effects of STW 5 (Iberogast) and its components in gastric fundus, corpus and antrum.
    Phytomedicine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Michael Schemann, Klaus Michel, F. Zeller, B. Hohenester, Anne Rühl
    Abstract:

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a disorder that involves impaired gastric accommodation, antral hypomotility, and upper abdominal pain. The herbal drug STW 5 (Iberogast®) is used to successfully treat FD patients. Here, we report in vitro data revealing the mode of action of STW 5 and its individual herbal extracts on gastric motility. STW 5 evoked a relaxation of the proximal stomach but increased antral motility. Both effects are myogenic. The extracts of Angelica Root, chamomile flower and liquorice Root mimicked the inhibitory effects in the proximal stomach whereas the extracts of greater celandine herb, Melissa leaf, caraway fruit and bitter candy tuft increased motility of the proximal stomach. All extracts increased motility in the antrum comparable to the effects of STW 5. We conclude that the differential effects of STW 5 on proximal and distal stomach motor activity are not caused by solely spasmolytic or anti-spasmolytic effects of the individual components. It is suggested that the individual extracts target transduction mechanisms that are specifically expressed in the proximal vs. distal stomach. We present a rationale for the differential effect of STW 5 which is a result of the combined actions of its individual components and reason that the inhibitory effects in the proximal and the excitatory effects in the distal stomach may contribute to symptom relief in FD patients treated with STW 5 (Iberogast®).

Karl Wah Keung Tsim – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Metabonomic Analysis of Water Extracts from Different Angelica Roots by 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
    Molecules (Basel Switzerland), 2014
    Co-Authors: Pui Hei Nicholas Chan, Karl Wah Keung Tsim, Wendy L. Zhang, Chung-ho E Lau, Chi Yuen Cheung, Hector C. Keun, Henry H N Lam
    Abstract:

    Angelica Radix, the Roots of the genus Angelica, has been used for more than 2,000 years as a traditional medicine in Eastern Asia. The Chinese Pharmacopoeia records more than 100 herbal formulae containing Angelica Roots. There are two common sources of Angelica Roots, Angelica sinensis from China and A. gigas from Korea. The two species of Angelica Roots differ in their chemical compositions, pharmacological properties and clinical efficacy. ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling has recently emerged as a promising quality control method for food and herbal chemistry. We explored the use of ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling for the quality control of Angelica Radix. Unlike previous work, we performed the metabolic profiling on hot water extracts, so as to mimic the clinically relevant preparation method. Unsupervised principle component analyses of both the full spectral profile and a selection of targeted molecules revealed a clear differentiation of three types of Angelica Roots. In addition, the levels of 13 common metabolites were measured. Statistically significant differences in the levels of glucose, fructose and threonine were found between different sources of Angelica. Ferulic acid, a marker commonly used to evaluate Angelica Root, was detected in our samples, but the difference in ferulic acid levels between the samples was not statistically significant. Overall, we successfully applied ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling with water extraction to discriminate all three sources of Angelica Roots, and obtained quantitative information of many common metabolites.

  • Dang-Gui Buxue Tang produces a more potent cardioprotective effect than its component herb extracts and enhances glutathione status in rat heart mitochondria and erythrocytes.
    Phytotherapy research : PTR, 2006
    Co-Authors: Duncan Hon Fai Mak, Po Yee Chiu, Tina T. X. Dong, Karl Wah Keung Tsim
    Abstract:

    The effects of pretreatment with Dang-Gui Buxue Tang (DBT, a decoction of Astragali and Angelica Roots) and its component herb extracts on myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury were examined in rats ex vivo. DBT and its component herb extracts could protect against myocardial IR injury in a dose-dependent manner. The more potent cardioprotection afforded by DBT pretreatment than that of a mixture of Astragali and Angelica Root extracts was associated with a much higher extraction yield of active ingredients from Angelica Root in the herbal decoction. The high level of active ingredients might increase their bioavailability after oral administration. DBT pretreatment could enhance myocardial mitochondrial as well as red blood cell (RBC) glutathione status, thereby increasing their resistance to oxidative stress-induced injury in rats. The measurement of RBC glutathione status may serve as a useful index for the antioxidant effect produced by DBT treatment in human subjects.

  • identification and quantification of 13 components in Angelica sinensis danggui by gas chromatography mass spectrometry coupled with pressurized liquid extraction
    Analytica Chimica Acta, 2004
    Co-Authors: Shaoping Li, Peng Li, Yitao Wang, Tina Tingxia Dong, Karl Wah Keung Tsim
    Abstract:

    Angelica sinensis (Danggui in Chinese), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, is also used as a health food product for women’s care in Europe and America. Therefore, the demand for Danggui is enormous throughout the world. Due to the shortage of Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutilobaand Angelica gigas are commonly used as the substitutes of Danggui in the market of southeast Asia. However, the three common Angelica Roots showed variation in their genetic and chemical composition. Up to date, it is thought that ferulic acid, ligustilide and other phthalides such as butylidenephthalide are the biologically active components of Danggui. In this paper, the contents of 13 compounds including ferulic acid, Z-ligustilide, E-ligustilide, Z-butylidenephthalide, E-butylidenephthalide, 3-butylphthalide, 3-butylidene4-hydroxyphthalide, senkyunolide A, 6,7-epoxyligustilide, senkyunolide F, senkyunolide H, senkyunolide I, and 6,7-dihydroxyligustilide were determined or estimated by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) coupled with pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). The results showed that GC–MS coupled with PLE offered a simple, rapid and high sensitive method to analysis of components in Angelica Root. And the contents of investigated compounds in Angelica sinensis, Angelica acutilobaand Angelica gigas, which are used as Danggui in China, Japan and Korea, respectively, were highly variant. It is thought that interaction of multiple chemical compounds contributes to the therapeutic effects of Chinese medicines. However, the overall clinical efficacy of these different Danggui has not been determined. Therefore, comparison of chemical components and pharmacological activities of different Angelica Root is helpful to elucidate the mechanism of therapeutic effects of Danggui. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Cheng Jiang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • chemopreventive effect of korean Angelica Root extract on tramp carcinogenesis and integrative omic profiling of affected neuroendocrine carcinomas
    Molecular Carcinogenesis, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jinhui Zhang, Lei Wang, Yong Zhang, Su-ni Tang, Chengguo Xing, Sung Hoon Kim, Cheng Jiang
    Abstract:

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) Root ethanol extract exerts anti-cancer activity in several allograft and xenograft models. Here we examined its chemopreventive efficacy through gavage administration against primary carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice and wild type littermates were given a daily gavage (5 mg/mouse, Monday–Friday) of AGN or vehicle, beginning at 8 wk of age (WOA). All mice were terminated at 24 WOA, unless earlier euthanasia was necessitated by large tumors. Whereas AGN-treated TRAMP mice decreased dorsolateral prostate lesion growth by 30% (P = 0.009), they developed fewer and smaller neuroendocrine-carcinomas (NE-Ca) (0.12 g/mouse) than vehicle-treated counterparts (0.81 g/mouse, P = 0.037). We analyzed the proteome and transcriptome of banked NE-Ca to gain molecular insights. Angiogenesis-antibody array detected a substantial reduction in AGN-treated NE-Ca of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an angiogenesis stimulator. iTRAQ proteomics plus data mining suggested changes of genes upstream and downstream of FGF2 functionally consistent with AGN inhibiting FGF2/FGFR1 signaling at different levels of the transduction cascade. Moreover, AGN upregulated mRNA of genes related to immune responses, restored expression of many tumor suppressor genes, and prostate function and muscle differentiation genes. On the other hand, AGN down-regulated mRNA of genes related to neuron signaling, oncofetal antigens, inflammation, and mast cells, Wnt signaling, embryonic morphogenesis, biosynthesis, cell adheadhesion, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. These changes suggest not only multiple cancer cell targeting actions of AGN but also impact on the tumor microenvironments such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune surveillance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • Chemopreventive effect of Korean Angelica Root extract on TRAMP carcinogenesis and integrative “omic” profiling of affected neuroendocrine carcinomas
    Molecular carcinogenesis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jinhui Zhang, Lei Wang, Yong Zhang, Su-ni Tang, Chengguo Xing, Sung Hoon Kim, Cheng Jiang
    Abstract:

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) Root ethanol extract exerts anti-cancer activity in several allograft and xenograft models. Here we examined its chemopreventive efficacy through gavage administration against primary carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice and wild type littermates were given a daily gavage (5 mg/mouse, Monday-Friday) of AGN or vehicle, beginning at 8 wk of age (WOA). All mice were terminated at 24 WOA, unless earlier euthanasia was necessitated by large tumors. Whereas AGN-treated TRAMP mice decreased dorsolateral prostate lesion growth by 30% (P = 0.009), they developed fewer and smaller neuroendocrine-carcinomas (NE-Ca) (0.12 g/mouse) than vehicle-treated counterparts (0.81 g/mouse, P = 0.037). We analyzed the proteome and transcriptome of banked NE-Ca to gain molecular insights. Angiogenesis-antibody array detected a substantial reduction in AGN-treated NE-Ca of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an angiogenesis stimulator. iTRAQ proteomics plus data mining suggested changes of genes upstream and downstream of FGF2 functionally consistent with AGN inhibiting FGF2/FGFR1 signaling at different levels of the transduction cascade. Moreover, AGN upregulated mRNA of genes related to immune responses, restored expression of many tumor suppressor genes, and prostate function and muscle differentiation genes. On the other hand, AGN down-regulated mRNA of genes related to neuron signaling, oncofetal antigens, inflammation, and mast cells, Wnt signaling, embryonic morphogenesis, biosynthesis, cell adheadhesion, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. These changes suggest not only multiple cancer cell targeting actions of AGN but also impact on the tumor microenvironments such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune surveillance.