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Bruce R Cooper – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evaluation of a tandem gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry metabolomics platform as a single method to investigate the effect of starvation on whole Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout oncorhynchus mykiss
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Bradley L Baumgarner, Bruce R Cooper

    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) metabolomic platform to comprehensively analyze the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). Trout were either fed a commercial diet at 2% body mass twice daily or starved for 4 weeks. Metabolomic analysis was conducted on serum, liver and muscle tissue from each fish. Database searching and statistical analysis revealed that concentrations of more than 50 positively identified molecules changed significantly ( P <0.05) as a result of starvation. Our results indicate that starving rainbow trout for 4 weeks promotes increased utilization of select tissue fatty acids in liver and muscle. However, starvation did not significantly affect protein catabolism in peripheral tissues, as indicated by reductions in the level of serum amino acids in starved fish. In contrast, starvation appears to promote protein catabolism in liver as the level of methionine, proline and lysine metabolite 2-piperidine carboxylic acid increased significantly. Also, starvation resulted in significant changes in the level of numerous xenobiotics that could indicate the origin of particular feed ingredients and selective retention of these molecules in tissues. We suggest that metabolomic analysis using GC×GC/TOF-MS is an effective tool in studying whole-Animal Metabolism and the fate of important xenobiotic compounds in rainbow trout as numerous polar and non-polar metabolites were rapidly and accurately profiled using a single method.

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  • Evaluation of a tandem gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolomics platform as a single method to investigate the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Bradley L Baumgarner, Bruce R Cooper

    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) metabolomic platform to comprehensively analyze the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). Trout were either fed a commercial diet at 2% body mass twice daily or starved for 4 weeks. Metabolomic analysis was conducted on serum, liver and muscle tissue from each fish. Database searching and statistical analysis revealed that concentrations of more than 50 positively identified molecules changed significantly ( P

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Bradley L Baumgarner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evaluation of a tandem gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry metabolomics platform as a single method to investigate the effect of starvation on whole Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout oncorhynchus mykiss
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Bradley L Baumgarner, Bruce R Cooper

    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) metabolomic platform to comprehensively analyze the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). Trout were either fed a commercial diet at 2% body mass twice daily or starved for 4 weeks. Metabolomic analysis was conducted on serum, liver and muscle tissue from each fish. Database searching and statistical analysis revealed that concentrations of more than 50 positively identified molecules changed significantly ( P <0.05) as a result of starvation. Our results indicate that starving rainbow trout for 4 weeks promotes increased utilization of select tissue fatty acids in liver and muscle. However, starvation did not significantly affect protein catabolism in peripheral tissues, as indicated by reductions in the level of serum amino acids in starved fish. In contrast, starvation appears to promote protein catabolism in liver as the level of methionine, proline and lysine metabolite 2-piperidine carboxylic acid increased significantly. Also, starvation resulted in significant changes in the level of numerous xenobiotics that could indicate the origin of particular feed ingredients and selective retention of these molecules in tissues. We suggest that metabolomic analysis using GC×GC/TOF-MS is an effective tool in studying whole-Animal Metabolism and the fate of important xenobiotic compounds in rainbow trout as numerous polar and non-polar metabolites were rapidly and accurately profiled using a single method.

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  • Evaluation of a tandem gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolomics platform as a single method to investigate the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Bradley L Baumgarner, Bruce R Cooper

    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) metabolomic platform to comprehensively analyze the effect of starvation on whole-Animal Metabolism in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). Trout were either fed a commercial diet at 2% body mass twice daily or starved for 4 weeks. Metabolomic analysis was conducted on serum, liver and muscle tissue from each fish. Database searching and statistical analysis revealed that concentrations of more than 50 positively identified molecules changed significantly ( P

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Michel Laurentie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Tools to evaluate pharmacokinetics data for establishing maximum residue limits for approved veterinary drugs: examples from JECFA’s work
    Drug Testing and Analysis, 2016
    Co-Authors: Pascal Sanders, Jérôme Henri, Michel Laurentie

    Abstract:

    Maximum residue limits (MRLs) for residues of veterinary drugs are the maximum concentrations of residues permitted in or on a food by national or regional legislation. In the process of MRLs recommendations by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), analysis of pharmacokinetic data describing the ADME process (absorption, distribution, Metabolism and excretion) is a crucial step and requires the use of different pharmacokinetic tools. The results of Animal Metabolism studies are the prime determinants of the residue definition in food commodities. Substances labelled with radioactive isotopes are used so that the disposition of the residue can be followed as total residue and main metabolites concentrations. Residue depletion studies with radiolabelled parent drug will lead to the estimate of the time course of the total residue and to determine a marker residue. Depletion studies with an unlabelled drug provide more information on the time course of the marker residue in raw commodities after administration under approved practical conditions of use. By use of this information and after conversion with the total/residue marker ratio, MRLs are derived by comparison of the acceptable daily intake with the daily intakes calculated with different scenarios of dietary exposure. Progress in pharmacokinetic model such as physiologically based pharmacokinetics and population pharmacokinetics will drive the future research in this field to improved veterinary drug development.

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