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Annual Weeds

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William W. Donald – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Control of Both Winter Annual and Summer Annual Weeds in No-Till Corn with
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: William W. Donald

    Abstract:

    In previous research, summer Annual Weeds were successfully controlled in no-till corn with between-row mowing systems that consisted of soil-residual preemergence herbicides banded over corn rows followed by mowing Weeds close to the soil surface one or two times later during the growing season. The objective of this research was to determine whether betweenrow mowing systems could successfully control both winter Annual and summer Annual Weeds as well as broadcast herbicides perform in no-till corn. In two of three years in Missouri, between-row mowing systems controlled and reduced both winter Annual and summer Annual weed cover and prevented Weeds from reducing corn yields. Corn yields for the following no-till weed management systems equaled the weed-free check: winter Annual weed control with between-row mowing plus preplant, banded, postemergence-applied glyphosate at 1.1 kg ae/ha and later summer Annual weed control with postplant, banded, preemergence-applied atrazine plus S-metolachlor at 2.2 plus 1.8 kg ai/ha followed by betweenrow mowing. Winter Annual Weeds growing between rows were controlled with one mowing, and later summer Annual Weeds were controlled with either one late or “middle” mowing or two mowings (i.e., early and late). Total herbicide use was reduced 50% (i.e., 25 and 25%, respectively) in no-till corn. Commercially acceptable corn stands were needed for between-row mowing systems to adequately control Weeds. In one of three years when corn stands were half of those of the other two years, broadcast herbicides performed better than between-row mowing systems in no-till corn. Nomenclature: Atrazine; S-metolachlor; corn, Zea mays L. ‘Pioneer 33G28’ ZEAMX.

  • Control of Both Winter Annual and Summer Annual Weeds in No-till Corn with Between-row Mowing Systems
    Weed Technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: William W. Donald

    Abstract:

    In previous research, summer Annual Weeds were successfully controlled in no-till corn with between-row mowing systems that consisted of soil-residual preemergence herbicides banded over corn rows followed by mowing Weeds close to the soil surface one or two times later during the growing season. The objective of this research was to determine whether between-row mowing systems could successfully control both winter Annual and summer Annual Weeds as well as broadcast herbicides perform in no-till corn. In two of three years in Missouri, between-row mowing systems controlled and reduced both winter Annual and summer Annual weed cover and prevented Weeds from reducing corn yields. Corn yields for the following no-till weed management systems equaled the weed-free check: winter Annual weed control with between-row mowing plus preplant, banded, postemergence-applied glyphosate at 1.1 kg ae/ha and later summer Annual weed control with postplant, banded, preemergence-applied atrazine plus S-metolachlor at 2.2 p…

  • between row mowing banded herbicide to control Annual Weeds and reduce herbicide use in no till soybean glycine max and corn zea mays 1
    Weed Technology, 2001
    Co-Authors: William W. Donald, Newell R. Kitchen, Kenneth A. Sudduth

    Abstract:

    Abstract: Alternative methods are needed to control Weeds in no-till corn and soybean which minimize herbicide contamination of surface or ground water. The objective of this research was to determine whether between-row (BR) mowing + band-applied herbicide could help reduce herbicide use, without sacrificing summer Annual weed control or yield, in no-till soybean and field corn. Glyphosate was applied shortly before or at planting to control emerged winter Annual Weeds in all treatments. In the BR mowing weed management system, the band-applied soil residual herbicides imazaquin + alachlor in soybean or atrazine + alachlor in corn were applied shortly before or after planting followed by two or more between-row mowings to control summer Annual Weeds. Annual Weeds were first mowed when they were about 8 cm tall and again just before crop canopy closure. Between-row mowing Weeds very close to the soil surface two or three times killed or suppressed summer Annual grass and broadleaf Weeds, chiefly giant fox…

William G. Johnson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Influence of Winter Annual Weed Management and Crop Rotation on Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines) and Winter Annual Weeds: Years Four and Five
    Weed Science, 2012
    Co-Authors: Valerie A. Mock, J. Earl Creech, Andreas Westphal, Virginia R. Ferris, J. Faghihi, Judith B. Santini, William G. Johnson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Certain winter Annual Weeds have been documented as alternative hosts to soybean cyst nematode (SCN), and infestations by such species are common in no-till production fields in the midwestern United States of Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois. The objective of this research was to determine the influence of crop rotation and winter Annual weed management on winter weed growth, SCN population density, and crop yield. Two crop rotations (SS and soybean–corn rotation) and six winter Annual weed-management systems (autumn-applied herbicide, spring-applied herbicide, autumn + spring applied herbicides, autumn-seeded Italian ryegrass, autumn-seeded wheat, and a nontreated check) were evaluated in long-term, no-tillage systems at West Lafayette, IN, and Vincennes, IN. In the fourth and fifth years of these experiments, the 2-yr corn–soybean rotation generally resulted in increased soybean yield, decreased winter Annual weed growth, and reduced SCN population density compared with SS. Autumn or spring herbici…

  • Influence of Winter Annual Weed Management and Crop Rotation on Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera Glycines) and Winter Annual Weeds
    Weed Science, 2008
    Co-Authors: J. Earl Creech, Andreas Westphal, Virginia R. Ferris, J. Faghihi, Tony J. Vyn, Judith B. Santini, William G. Johnson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Certain winter Annual Weeds have been documented as alternative hosts to soybean cyst nematode (SCN), and infestations of such species have become common in no-till production fields in the Midwest. This research was conducted to determine the influence of herbicide- and cover-crop-based winter Annual weed management systems and crop rotation on winter Annual weed growth and seed production, SCN population density, and crop yield. Two crop rotations (continuous soybean and soybean-corn) and six winter Annual weed management systems (a nontreated control, fall and spring herbicide applications, spring-applied herbicide, fall-applied herbicide, fall-seeded Annual ryegrass, and fall-seeded winter wheat) were evaluated in no-tillage systems from fall 2003 to 2006 at West Lafayette, IN and Vincennes, IN. Fall or spring herbicide treatments generally resulted in lower winter Annual weed densities than cover crops. Densities of henbit and purple deadnettle increased over years in the cover crop systems …

  • Survey of Indiana Producers and Crop Advisors: A Perspective on Winter Annual Weeds and Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera Glycines)
    Weed Technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: J. Earl Creech, William G. Johnson, J. Faghihi, Virginia R. Ferris

    Abstract:

    Growers and certified crop advisors (CCAs) across Indiana were surveyed during the winter of 2003 to 2004 to assess their perceptions about soybean cyst nematode (SCN) and use of SCN management practices. Most farmers (57%) and CCAs (72%) surveyed reported a moderate to high level of concern regarding SCN and its potential impact on soybean yield. The majority of those surveyed were also aware that some winter Annual Weeds can serve as hosts for SCN. Crop management practices specifically aimed at managing the impact of SCN were employed by 55 and 78% of growers and CCAs, respectively. However, only 21% percent of growers said that they had sampled a field for nematodes within the last two years. Growers from eastern and southern Indiana were less likely to be concerned about SCN, to implement SCN management strategies, and to have the soil tested for SCN than growers throughout the rest of the state. In addition, smaller farmers appear to be less concerned and knowledgeable about SCN than those who operate larger farms. The results of this survey suggest that the majority of Indiana growers would likely adopt winter weed control to manage SCN. Also, with respect to winter weed control, future Extension efforts should be focused on southern Indiana where both the risk for SCN reproduction on winter Annuals and the need for education on SCN appear to be highest. Nomenclature: Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr.; soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe.

Kenneth A. Sudduth – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • between row mowing banded herbicide to control Annual Weeds and reduce herbicide use in no till soybean glycine max and corn zea mays 1
    Weed Technology, 2001
    Co-Authors: William W. Donald, Newell R. Kitchen, Kenneth A. Sudduth

    Abstract:

    Abstract: Alternative methods are needed to control Weeds in no-till corn and soybean which minimize herbicide contamination of surface or ground water. The objective of this research was to determine whether between-row (BR) mowing + band-applied herbicide could help reduce herbicide use, without sacrificing summer Annual weed control or yield, in no-till soybean and field corn. Glyphosate was applied shortly before or at planting to control emerged winter Annual Weeds in all treatments. In the BR mowing weed management system, the band-applied soil residual herbicides imazaquin + alachlor in soybean or atrazine + alachlor in corn were applied shortly before or after planting followed by two or more between-row mowings to control summer Annual Weeds. Annual Weeds were first mowed when they were about 8 cm tall and again just before crop canopy closure. Between-row mowing Weeds very close to the soil surface two or three times killed or suppressed summer Annual grass and broadleaf Weeds, chiefly giant fox…

  • Between-Row Mowing + Banded Herbicide to Control Annual Weeds and Reduce Herbicide Use in No-till Soybean (Glycine max) and Corn (Zea mays)1
    Weed Technology, 2001
    Co-Authors: William W. Donald, Newell R. Kitchen, Kenneth A. Sudduth

    Abstract:

    Abstract: Alternative methods are needed to control Weeds in no-till corn and soybean which minimize herbicide contamination of surface or ground water. The objective of this research was to determine whether between-row (BR) mowing + band-applied herbicide could help reduce herbicide use, without sacrificing summer Annual weed control or yield, in no-till soybean and field corn. Glyphosate was applied shortly before or at planting to control emerged winter Annual Weeds in all treatments. In the BR mowing weed management system, the band-applied soil residual herbicides imazaquin + alachlor in soybean or atrazine + alachlor in corn were applied shortly before or after planting followed by two or more between-row mowings to control summer Annual Weeds. Annual Weeds were first mowed when they were about 8 cm tall and again just before crop canopy closure. Between-row mowing Weeds very close to the soil surface two or three times killed or suppressed summer Annual grass and broadleaf Weeds, chiefly giant fox…