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Annular Velocity

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3960 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Jongwon Ha – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effects of treadmill exercise on mitral inflow and Annular velocities in healthy adults.
    American Journal of Cardiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jongwon Ha, James B Seward, Kent R. Bailey, Fabijan Lulic, Patricia A. Pellikka, A. Jamil Tajik, Jae K Oh

    Abstract:

    Tissue Doppler echocardiography has recently been introduced as a method to evaluate diastolic function by measuring diastolic mitral Annular Velocity. 1,2 Mitral Annular Velocity derived by tissue Doppler echocardiography is relatively independent of preload, and tissue Doppler echocardiography combined with transmitral flow Velocity appears to provide a better estimate of left ventricular (LV) filling pressures compared with other methods, such as pulmonary venous flow pattern or preload reduction. 3 However, exerciseinduced changes in tissue Doppler echocardiography and mitral inflow velocities have not been characterized adequately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate transmitral inflow pattern and the tissue Doppler echocardiographic profile of a mitral annulus in healthy subjects during exercise; this would establish normal reference values to be used in a stress test to assess the extent of the elevation in diastolic filling pressure with exercise. ••• The study group was composed of 31 healthy subjects (13 men and 18 women, aged 59 14 years) without a history of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cardiovascular symptoms, regular cardiac medication, or abnormal stress test results. Baseline measures of clinical characteristics, hemodynamic variables, mitral inflow, and diastolic velocities of the mitral annulus were obtained in all patients before exercise testing. This study was approved by the Mayo Foundation institutional review board. All subjects underwent a symptom-limited treadmill exercise test using the Bruce protocol. Blood pressure was obtained by a cuff sphygmomanometer at the 3-minute mark of each stage and at peak exercise. The 12-lead electrocardiogram was continuously monitored. All 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiograms were recorded using a commercially available echocardiographic unit equipped with an imaging transducer and pulse-wave Doppler capability. Ejection fraction was calculated on the basis of 2-dimensional echocardiography and a modification of the method of

  • effects of pericardiectomy on early diastolic mitral Annular Velocity in patients with constrictive pericarditis
    International Journal of Cardiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jongwon Ha, Euiyoung Choi, Eui Im, Sungha Park, Young Nam Yoon, Byungchul Chang, Namsik Chung

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: In patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP), early diastolic mitral Annular Velocity (E’) is usually normal or exaggerated due to limitation of lateral expansion by the constricting pericardium. Although pericardiectomy is the treatment of choice for CP, it is difficult to evaluate its effectiveness. Theoretically, E’ may decrease after successful pericardiectomy. However, little data are available regarding the effect of pericardiectomy on E’. The purpose of this study was to assess the change in E’ after pericardiectomy in patients with CP. METHODS: We studied 16 patients (12 males, mean age 62.3+/-7.0 years) with surgically confirmed CP for changes in pre-discharge Doppler parameters following pericardiectomy. CP was secondary to previous cardiac surgery in 4 patients, tuberculosis in 4 patients, radiation-induced in 1 patient, and idiopathic in 7 patients. Ten patients underwent complete pericardiectomy (62.5%). E’ was measured at the septal annulus before pericardiectomy and a mean duration of 10 (+/-6) days after. RESULTS: E’ significantly decreased from 9.2+/-2.7 cm/s to 7.4+/-2.6 after pericardiectomy (p=0.013). The mean percent change of E’ after pericardiectomy was 17.9+/-25.9%. The decrement of E’ was significantly higher in patients with complete pericardiectomy than in patients who underwent a partial pericardiectomy (2.7+/-2.3 vs. 0.4+/-2.1, p=0.042). Also, more than 15% decrease of E’ was significantly higher in patients with improvement of symptom after pericardiectomy (9 (100.0%) vs. 3 (42.9%), p=0.019). CONCLUSION: E’ decreased following pericardiectomy in most of the patients with CP. The change of E’ after pericardiectomy may be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of pericardiectomy.

  • value of echo doppler derived pulmonary vascular resistance net atrioventricular compliance and tricuspid Annular Velocity in determining exercise capacity in patients with mitral stenosis
    Circulation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Euiyoung Choi, Jongwon Ha, Seokmin Kang, Yangsoo Jang, Jaemin Shim, Chi Young Shim, Sejung Yoon, Donghoon Choi, Namsik Chung

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The present study sought to determine if echo-Doppler-derived pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR echo), net-atrioventricular compliance (Cn) and tricuspid peak systolic Annular Velocity (Sa), as parameters of right ventricular function, have value in predicting exercise capacity in patients with mitral stenosis (MS). METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with moderate or severe MS without left ventricular systolic dysfunction were studied. After comprehensive echo-Doppler measurements, including PVR echo, tricuspid Sa and left-sided Cn, supine bicycle exercise echo and concomitant respiratory gas analysis were performed. Measurements during 5 cardiac cycles representing the mean heart rate were averaged. Increment of resting PVR(echo) (r=-0.416, p=0.018) and decrement of resting Sa (r=0.433, p=0.013) and Cn (r=0.469, p=0.007) were significantly associated with decrease in %VO(2) peak. The predictive accuracy for %VO2 peak could increase by combining these parameters as Sa/PVR echo (r=0.500, p=0.004) or Cn. (Sa/PVR echo) (r=0.572, p=0.001) independent of mitral valve area, mean diastolic pressure gradients or presence of atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of PVR echo, Cn and Sa might provide important information about the exercise capacity of patients with MS.

Namsik Chung – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of pericardiectomy on early diastolic mitral Annular Velocity in patients with constrictive pericarditis
    International Journal of Cardiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jongwon Ha, Euiyoung Choi, Eui Im, Sungha Park, Young Nam Yoon, Byungchul Chang, Namsik Chung

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: In patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP), early diastolic mitral Annular Velocity (E’) is usually normal or exaggerated due to limitation of lateral expansion by the constricting pericardium. Although pericardiectomy is the treatment of choice for CP, it is difficult to evaluate its effectiveness. Theoretically, E’ may decrease after successful pericardiectomy. However, little data are available regarding the effect of pericardiectomy on E’. The purpose of this study was to assess the change in E’ after pericardiectomy in patients with CP. METHODS: We studied 16 patients (12 males, mean age 62.3+/-7.0 years) with surgically confirmed CP for changes in pre-discharge Doppler parameters following pericardiectomy. CP was secondary to previous cardiac surgery in 4 patients, tuberculosis in 4 patients, radiation-induced in 1 patient, and idiopathic in 7 patients. Ten patients underwent complete pericardiectomy (62.5%). E’ was measured at the septal annulus before pericardiectomy and a mean duration of 10 (+/-6) days after. RESULTS: E’ significantly decreased from 9.2+/-2.7 cm/s to 7.4+/-2.6 after pericardiectomy (p=0.013). The mean percent change of E’ after pericardiectomy was 17.9+/-25.9%. The decrement of E’ was significantly higher in patients with complete pericardiectomy than in patients who underwent a partial pericardiectomy (2.7+/-2.3 vs. 0.4+/-2.1, p=0.042). Also, more than 15% decrease of E’ was significantly higher in patients with improvement of symptom after pericardiectomy (9 (100.0%) vs. 3 (42.9%), p=0.019). CONCLUSION: E’ decreased following pericardiectomy in most of the patients with CP. The change of E’ after pericardiectomy may be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of pericardiectomy.

  • value of echo doppler derived pulmonary vascular resistance net atrioventricular compliance and tricuspid Annular Velocity in determining exercise capacity in patients with mitral stenosis
    Circulation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Euiyoung Choi, Jongwon Ha, Seokmin Kang, Yangsoo Jang, Jaemin Shim, Chi Young Shim, Sejung Yoon, Donghoon Choi, Namsik Chung

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The present study sought to determine if echo-Doppler-derived pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR echo), net-atrioventricular compliance (Cn) and tricuspid peak systolic Annular Velocity (Sa), as parameters of right ventricular function, have value in predicting exercise capacity in patients with mitral stenosis (MS). METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with moderate or severe MS without left ventricular systolic dysfunction were studied. After comprehensive echo-Doppler measurements, including PVR echo, tricuspid Sa and left-sided Cn, supine bicycle exercise echo and concomitant respiratory gas analysis were performed. Measurements during 5 cardiac cycles representing the mean heart rate were averaged. Increment of resting PVR(echo) (r=-0.416, p=0.018) and decrement of resting Sa (r=0.433, p=0.013) and Cn (r=0.469, p=0.007) were significantly associated with decrease in %VO(2) peak. The predictive accuracy for %VO2 peak could increase by combining these parameters as Sa/PVR echo (r=0.500, p=0.004) or Cn. (Sa/PVR echo) (r=0.572, p=0.001) independent of mitral valve area, mean diastolic pressure gradients or presence of atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of PVR echo, Cn and Sa might provide important information about the exercise capacity of patients with MS.

  • incremental value of combining systolic mitral Annular Velocity and time difference between mitral inflow and diastolic mitral Annular Velocity to early diastolic Annular Velocity for differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiom
    Journal of The American Society of Echocardiography, 2007
    Co-Authors: Euiyoung Choi, Jongwon Ha, Namsik Chung

    Abstract:

    Although normal or exaggerated early diastolic mitral Annular Velocity (E′) provides an excellent specificity for differentiating constrictive pericarditis (CP) from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), its sensitivity has been shown to be lower, especially in patients with CP who had underlying myocardial abnormality. This study sought to evaluate the incremental value of systolic mitral Annular Velocity (S′) and time difference between onset of mitral inflow and onset of E′ (T (E′-E) ) for differentiation between CP and RCM. This study included 44 participants (28 male, 16 female; mean age 47 years, range 10-76): 17 patients with CP, 12 with RCM, and 15 control subjects. Standard mitral inflow Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed. E′ (9.5 ± 1.7 vs 4.7 ± 1.6 cm/s, P P (E′-E) (21.0 ± 32.0 vs 53.1 ± 30.4 milliseconds, P = .02) was significantly shorter in patients with CP than with RCM. Diagnostic accuracy of E′ for differentiation of CP from RCM was higher than S′ or T (E′-E) (area under curve 0.99 vs 0.87 vs 0.74, respectively). E′ of 8 cm/s had excellent specificity (100%) for differentiation of CP from RCM but sensitivity (70%) was relatively low. However, when combining E′ with S′ and T (E′-E) , the sensitivity could be increased when compared with E′ alone (70% with E′, 88% with E′ + S′, and 94% with E′ + S′ + T (E′-E) ), P = .001). In conclusion, the measurement of S′ and T (E′-E) can be helpful for differentiating between CP and RCM by providing incremental diagnostic information to E′.

Rolf Nordlander – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effects of first myocardial infarction on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function with the use of mitral Annular Velocity determined by pulsed wave doppler tissue imaging.
    Journal of The American Society of Echocardiography, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mahbubul Alam, Johan Wardell, Eva Andersson, Bassem A Samad, Rolf Nordlander

    Abstract:

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a first myocardial infarction (MI) on the systolic and diastolic Velocity profiles of the mitral annulus determined by pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging and thereby evaluate left ventricular (LV) function after MI. Seventy-eight patients with a first MI were examined before discharge. Peak systolic, peak early diastolic, and peak late diastolic velocities were recorded at 4 different sites on the mitral annulus corresponding to the septum, anterior, lateral, and inferior sites of the left ventricle. In addition, the amplitude of mitral Annular motion at the 4 above LV sites, the ejection fraction, and conventional Doppler diastolic parameters were recorded. Nineteen agematched healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with healthy subjects, the MI patients had a significantly reduced peak systolic Velocity at the mitral annulus, especially at the infarction sites. A relatively good linear correlation was found between the ejection fraction and the mean systolic Velocity from the 4 LV sites (r = 0.74, P < .001). The correlation was also good when the mean peak systolic mitral Annular Velocity was tested against the magnitude of the mean mitral Annular motion (r = 0.77, P < .001). When the patients were divided into 2 different groups with respect to an ejection fraction ≥0.50 or

  • effects of first myocardial infarction on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function with the use of mitral Annular Velocity determined by pulsed wave doppler tissue imaging
    Journal of The American Society of Echocardiography, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mahbubul Alam, Johan Wardell, Eva Andersson, Bassem A Samad, Rolf Nordlander

    Abstract:

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a first myocardial infarction (MI) on the systolic and diastolic Velocity profiles of the mitral annulus determined by pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging and thereby evaluate left ventricular (LV) function after MI. Seventy-eight patients with a first MI were examined before discharge. Peak systolic, peak early diastolic, and peak late diastolic velocities were recorded at 4 different sites on the mitral annulus corresponding to the septum, anterior, lateral, and inferior sites of the left ventricle. In addition, the amplitude of mitral Annular motion at the 4 above LV sites, the ejection fraction, and conventional Doppler diastolic parameters were recorded. Nineteen agematched healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with healthy subjects, the MI patients had a significantly reduced peak systolic Velocity at the mitral annulus, especially at the infarction sites. A relatively good linear correlation was found between the ejection fraction and the mean systolic Velocity from the 4 LV sites (r = 0.74, P < .001). The correlation was also good when the mean peak systolic mitral Annular Velocity was tested against the magnitude of the mean mitral Annular motion (r = 0.77, P < .001). When the patients were divided into 2 different groups with respect to an ejection fraction ≥0.50 or <0.50, a cutoff point of mean systolic mitral Annular Velocity of ≥7.5 cm/s had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 88% in predicting a preserved global LV systolic function. Similar to systolic velocities, the early diastolic Velocity was also reduced, especially at the infarction sites. The peak mitral Annular early diastolic Velocity correlated well with both LV ejection fraction (r = 0.66, P < .001) and mean systolic mitral Annular motion (r = 0.68, P < .001). However, no correlation existed between the early diastolic Velocity and conventional diastolic Doppler parameters. The reduced peak systolic mitral Annular Velocity seems to be an expression of regionally reduced systolic function. The peak early diastolic Velocity is also reduced, especially at the infarction sites, and reflects regional diastolic dysfunction. Thus, quantification of myocardial Velocity by Doppler tissue imaging opens up a new possibility of assessing LV function along its long axis. (J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2000;13:343-52.)

  • right ventricular function in patients with first inferior myocardial infarction assessment by tricuspid Annular motion and tricuspid Annular Velocity
    American Heart Journal, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mahbubul Alam, Johan Wardell, Eva Andersson, Bassem A Samad, Rolf Nordlander

    Abstract:

    Background Unlike left ventricular function, right ventricular (RV) function has not been widely studied after a myocardial infarction (MI). The current study describes RV function determined by tricuspid Annular motion and tricuspid Annular Velocity after MI.

    Methods and Results Thirty-eight patients with a first acute inferior MI were prospectively compared with 33 patients with a first anterior MI and 24 age-matched healthy individuals. Association of RV infarction in inferior MI was defined as the presence of ≥1-mm ST-segment elevation at the right precordial lead, V4R, of the electrocardiograms. From the echocardiographic opical 4-chamber views, the systolic motion of the tricuspid annulus was recorded at the RV free wall with the use of 2-dimensional guided M-mode recordings. Peak systolic and peak early and late diastolic velocities of the tricuspid annulus at the RV free wall also were recorded with the use of pulsed-wave Doppler tissue imaging. The tricuspid Annular motion was reduced in inferior MI compared with that in healthy individuals (20.5 and 25 mm, P < .001). The peak systolic Velocity of the tricuspid annulus was significantly reduced in inferior MI compared with that in healthy individuals (12 vs 14.5 cm/s, P < .001) and patients with anterior M1 (12 and 14.5 cm/s, P < .001). Patients with inferior MI were divided into 2 subgroups: those with and those without electrocardiographic signs of RV infarction. The tricuspid Annular motion was significantly lower in patients with RV infarction than in patients without RV infarction (17 and 22.7 mm, P < .001). In addition, compared with patients without electrocardiographic signs of RV infarction, patients with RV infarction also had a significantly decreased peak systolic tricuspid Annular Velocity (13.3 and 10.3 cm/s, P < .001) and peak early diastolic Velocity (13 and 8.2 cm/s, P < .001). Conclusions These results suggest that tricuspid Annular motion and tricuspid Annular Velocity can be used to assess RV function in association with inferior MI.