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Anomic Aphasia

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Maria Kambanaros – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lexical retrieval deficits in Anomic Aphasia and specific language impairment (SLI): More similar than different? Grammatical class and context effects
    Linguistic Variation, 2013
    Co-Authors: Maria Kambanaros, Willem Van Steenbrugge

    Abstract:

    Lexical retrieval of verbs and nouns was compared in two groups of impaired language users, children diagnosed with SLI and adults with acquired Anomic Aphasia, on two production tasks: picture confrontation naming and connected speech. Both children with SLI and adults with Anomic Aphasia showed a more substantial lexical or naming deficit for verbs than for nouns. However, no specific verb retrieval deficit was observed in connected speech in either group. Furthermore, partial correlations between verb and noun naming and their type-token ratios in connected speech failed to find an association between verb/ noun retrieval in naming and in connected speech. The results suggest (1) that children with SLI and adults with Anomic Aphasia show a specific verb deficit in naming, and (2) that the ability to predict lexical retrieval abilities for verbs (and nouns) in connected speech from naming performance is weak for both groups.

  • Group effects of instrumentality and name relation on action naming in bilingual Anomic Aphasia
    Brain and language, 2009
    Co-Authors: Maria Kambanaros

    Abstract:

    Verb production in sentences was investigated in two groups of late bilingual Greek-English speakers: individuals with Anomic Aphasia and a control group. Verb retrieval in sentences was significantly impaired in both languages for the individuals with Anomic Aphasia. Additional results revealed no effect of instrumentality on action naming in sentences in either language. However, there was a negative effect of verb-noun name relation on instrumental verb production in English only. Results confirm intact verb lemma retrieval for this group of bilingual individuals with Anomic Aphasia, but a breakdown at the level of accessing the phonological or lexical form.

  • The effect of instrumentality and verb-noun name relation on verb retrieval in bilingual Greek-English Anomic aphasic individuals
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: Maria Kambanaros

    Abstract:

    The effect of instrumentality and verb-noun name relation has been studied in a group of late bilingual, Greek-English speaking individuals with Anomic Aphasia, who had previously shown a greater verb than noun impairment in a picture naming task. The results revealed a facilitatory effect of instrumentality in both languages. However, there was no effect of verb-noun name relation in Greek, and a negative effect of verb-noun name relation was observed in English. The findings showed that lemma retrieval was intact in this group of bilingual individuals whose main problem seemed to arise during the retrieval of the phonological representation of the target word.

Shum, Wai-man Waisa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Measuring the coherence of normal and aphasic discourse production in Chinese using rhetorical structure theory (RST)
    The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam Hong Kong), 2014
    Co-Authors: Shum, Wai-man Waisa

    Abstract:

    The study investigated the difference in discourse coherence between healthy speakers and speakers with Anomic Aphasia using Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST). The effect of genre types on coherence and potential factors contributing to the differences were also examined. Fifteen native Cantonese participants of Anomic Aphasia and their control matched in age, education and gender participated. Sixty language samples were obtained using the story-telling and sequential description tasks of the Cantonese AphasiaBank protocol. Twenty naïve listeners provided subjective ratings on the coherence, completeness, correctness of order, and clarity of each speech sample. Results demonstrated that the control group showed significantly higher production fluency, total number of discourse units, and fewer errors than the Aphasia group. Controls used a richer set of relations than the aphasic group, particularly those to describe settings, to express causality, and to elaborate. The aphasic group tended to omit more essential information content and was rated with significantly lower coherence and clarity than controls. The findings suggested that speakers with Anomic Aphasia had reduced proportion of essential information content, lower degree of elaboration, and more structural disruptions than the controls, which may have contributed to the reduced overall discourse coherence.published_or_final_versionSpeech and Hearing SciencesBachelorBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Science

  • Measuring the coherence of healthy and aphasic discourse production in Chinese using Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST)
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kong Anthony Pak Hin, Linnik Anastasia, Sampo, Shum, Wai-man Waisa

    Abstract:

    Introduction
    Discourse coherence refers to the semantic connectedness of propositions in a connected speech. Various theoretical bases, narrative elicitation tasks, and sample quantifications as well as small sample sizes in most studies resulted in a substantial disparity in findings regarding the micro-linguistic and macro-linguistic aspects of aphasic discourse (Armstrong, 2000). Specifically, while some reports claimed macro-linguistic skills in Aphasia to be well-preserved despite lexical, grammatical, and phonological impairments, other studies demonstrated reduced discourse coherence due to omission of important content and higher proportion of irrelevant propositions.
    In this study we analyzed the discourse structure in aphasic connected speech using Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST; Mann & Thompson, 1988). RST analyzes text organization by describing the semantic relations that hold between units of a text. The present study investigated how discourse coherence in healthy speakers differed from speakers with Anomic Aphasia. Potential factors contributing to these differences were also examined.

    Method
    Fifteen Cantonese-speaking adults with Anomic Aphasia and their controls matched in age, education, and gender participated. Sixty language samples were obtained using the story-telling and sequential description tasks of the Cantonese AphasiaBank protocol. Each sample was segmented into elementary discourse units (EDU) and annotated according to RST. The annotations were analyzed in terms of 12 parameters measuring the depth, structural disruption, and expansion of discourse structure.
    Twenty naïve listeners participated in a perception experiment, where they were asked to provide subjective ratings of the coherence, completeness, correctness of order, and clarity of each speech sample.

    Results
    The non-brain-damaged group demonstrated significantly higher production fluency, total number of EDUs, size of relation set, and fewer errors (semantic, phonemic parAphasia, morphological errors, and neologisms) than the Aphasia group. Analysis of semantic relations employed revealed that controls used a richer set of relations than subjects with Aphasia, particularly those to describe settings, to express causality, and to elaborate. More reformulations, corrections, false starts, and retracing were found in aphasic discourse. The aphasic group also tended to have a higher degree of omission of essential information content and was rated by naïve listeners with significantly lower coherence and clarity than controls.
    An effect of genre was found where both speaker groups had a faster EDU production and greater variety of relations used in their story-telling than sequential description. Unexpectedly, speakers with Aphasia produced more EDU, with a greater depth of discourse structure, in the sequential description task.

    Conclusion
    Our results seemed to suggest that speakers with Anomic Aphasia had reduced proportion of essential information content, lower degree of elaboration, simplified discourse structure, and more structural disruptions than their healthy counterparts. We argue that the above characteristics have contributed to the reduced overall coherence in their oral discourse. The use of RST to quantify discourse coherence provided more objective measurement on macro-linguistic characteristics in Aphasia and, therefore, warrants further investigation

H Tanaka – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Postencephalitic pure Anomic Aphasia: 2-year follow-up.
    Journal of the neurological sciences, 2001
    Co-Authors: B Okuda, K Kawabata, H Tachibana, M Sugita, H Tanaka

    Abstract:

    We report a patient with pure Anomic Aphasia following encephalitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral temporal lesions, and subsequent focal atrophy in the left anterior inferior temporal lobe. Over the course of a 2-year follow-up, the patient’s naming difficulty persisted without other dysfunction of language or memory. These observations indicate a contribution of the left anterior inferior temporal region to object naming.