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Sydney C Macfie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • treatment outlines for avoidant dependent and passive aggressive personality disorders the quality Assurance Project
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Gavin Andrews, Sydney C Macfie, Caroline Hunt, Christopher Pollock, Stephen Thompson, Melbourne P Eisen, Sydney R Spielman, B Raphael

    Abstract:

    Treatment outlines for avoidant, dependent and passive-aggressive personality disorders were developed by having nominated experts consider their own views in the light of the treatment literature and the responses of practising psychiatrists. The experts recommend that long-term psychotherapy is the treatment of choice and that a considerable component of the outcome will be related to the therapeutic relationship. Assessment, general approaches to treatment, and strategies in psychodynamic management are outlined in some detail. For those individuals for whom long-term therapy is not available or appropriate, other therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, can be promising.

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N. J. Fix – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: N. J. Fix

    Abstract:

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality Assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by Project staff.

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  • PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: N. J. Fix

    Abstract:

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary. Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing strontium-90 flux to the Columbia River. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality Assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by Project staff.

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  • The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan
    , 2008
    Co-Authors: N. J. Fix

    Abstract:

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on Project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related Projects that are managed under a master Project (Project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master Project. Each Project within the master Project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the Project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality Assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

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Klaus Berger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • who receives rehabilitation after stroke data from the quality Assurance Project stroke register northwest germany
    Deutsches Arzteblatt International, 2013
    Co-Authors: Michael Unrath, Marianne Kalic, Klaus Berger

    Abstract:

    Reviews of randomized controlled studies have shown that specialist neurological rehabilitation after stroke reduces subsequent risk of need for nursing care, admission to a care institution, and mortality (1– 4). Factors that have been proven to be important for successful rehabilitation include starting early, and frequent, intensive training of specific motor, cognitive, and sensory functions (1, 4). The best evidence exists for the effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation measures (3, 5). However, systematic reviews also support the positive effects of measures provided on an outpatient or partly inpatient basis (2, 4, 6).

    Treatment guidelines for neurological rehabilitation take these results into account, recommending that rehabilitation by an organized specialist, interdisciplinary team should start as soon as possible after acute cerebral insult (7, 8). Exclusion criteria for some patients that have been discussed in the literature include medical factors that could militate against intensive (early) rehabilitation care that is primarily geared to neurological symptoms. Factors that have been discussed include:

    Pre-existing marked multi-morbidity (9);

    Injuries or complications that prevent mobilization (7, 10, 11);

    Need for technically very demanding intensive care (10, 11).

    With regard to multi-morbidity, very aged patients are often referred for geriatric rehabilitation care, where there is a particular focus on the treatment of concomitant disease (12).

    Neurological rehabilitation in Germany is divided into phases A to F (10); the phases relevant to the immediately post-acute period are phases B to D. In phase B, patients with severe neurological impairments are treated with intensive care interventions available. Patients who do not require intensive care and are able to cooperate with treatment to some extent are admitted to phase C, while phase D (“follow-on curative treatment”) is aimed at patients with little need for care who can manage basic activities of daily living for themselves (11, 13, 14).

    Few data are available for Germany as to how in practice patients are selected for rehabilitation care. Cost bearers are guided by, among other things, function scores such as the Barthel Index (BI) or Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index (ERBI) as well as the assessment of the hospital providing acute care (9, 15). In the German sample in the CERISE studies (Collaborative Evaluation in Rehabilitation of Stroke across Europe), the following parameters reduced the probability of inpatient neurological rehabilitation care (15):

    Pre-existing restrictions of function

    Cognitive deficits

    Low BI score

    Co-morbid depression

    Advanced age (15).

    In addition, affiliations between the care facilities involved and sometimes the negotiation skills of the patient and his or her relatives had an influence on admission to inpatient neurological rehabilitation care. So far, however, it is unclear what proportion of patients in Germany who are in need of neurological or geriatric rehabilitation actually receive this, and what other factors play a role.

    The aim of the present analysis was to investigate what clinical and sociodemographic patient characteristics contribute to stroke patients for whom rehabilitation is indicated actually receiving rehabilitation treatment when they leave acute inpatient neurological care.

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