Benchmark Program - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Benchmark Program

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Tanay Karnik – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A 45 nm Resilient Microprocessor Core for Dynamic Variation Tolerance
    IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2011
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    A 45 nm microprocessor core integrates resilient error-detection and recovery circuits to mitigate the clock frequency (FCLK) guardbands for dynamic parameter variations to improve throughput and energy efficiency. The core supports two distinct error-detection designs, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. The first design embeds error-detection sequential (EDS) circuits in critical paths to detect late timing transitions. In addition to reducing the Fclk guardbands for dynamic variations, the embedded EDS design can exploit path-activation rates to operate the microprocessor faster than infrequently-activated critical paths. The second error-detection design offers a less-intrusive approach for dynamic timing-error detection by placing a tunable replica circuit (TRC) per pipeline stage to monitor worst-case delays. Although the TRCs require a delay guardband to ensure the TRC delay is always slower than critical-path delays, the TRC design captures most of the benefits from the embedded EDS design with less implementation overhead. Furthermore, while core min-delay constraints limit the potential benefits of the embedded EDS design, a salient advantage of the TRC design is the ability to detect a wider range of dynamic delay variation, as demonstrated through low supply voltage (VCC) measurements. Both error-detection designs interface with error-recovery techniques, enabling the detection and correction of timing errors from fast-changing variations such as high-frequency VCC droops. The microprocessor core also supports two separate error-recovery techniques to guarantee correct execution even if dynamic variations persist. The first technique requires clock control to replay errant instructions at 1/2FCLK. In comparison, the second technique is a new multiple-issue instruction replay design that corrects errant instructions with a lower performance penalty and without requiring clock control. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the microprocessor includes a new adaptive clock control circuit that interfaces with the resilient circuits and a phase-locked loop (PLL) to track recovery cycles and adapt to persistent errors by dynamically changing Fclk f°Γ maximum efficiency.

  • Resilient microprocessor design for high performance & energy efficiency
    2010 ACM IEEE International Symposium on Low-Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED), 2010
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    Conventional microprocessors require a clock frequency (FCLK) guardband to ensure correct functionality during infrequent dynamic operating variations in supply voltage (VCC), temperature, and transistor aging. Consequently, these inflexible designs cannot exploit opportunities for higher performance by increasing FCLK or lower energy by reducing VCC during favorable operating conditions. This presentation describes a 45nm resilient microprocessor with error-detection and recovery circuits to detect and correct timing errors from dynamic variations to mitigate the FCLK guardband, thus enabling higher performance or lower energy as compared to a conventional design. The microprocessor core supports two distinct error-detection designs and two separate error-recovery techniques, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the resilient circuits guide an adaptive clock controller that tracks recovery cycles and adapts to persistent variations by changing FCLK. The combination of error-detection and recovery circuits with dynamic adaptation allows the microprocessor to adapt to the operating environment to deliver maximum efficiency. The presentation concludes by discussing the opportunity of applying resilient techniques to enhance the dynamic operating range (i.e., high-performance and low-power modes) for microprocessors.

Keith A. Bowman – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A 45 nm Resilient Microprocessor Core for Dynamic Variation Tolerance
    IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2011
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    A 45 nm microprocessor core integrates resilient error-detection and recovery circuits to mitigate the clock frequency (FCLK) guardbands for dynamic parameter variations to improve throughput and energy efficiency. The core supports two distinct error-detection designs, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. The first design embeds error-detection sequential (EDS) circuits in critical paths to detect late timing transitions. In addition to reducing the Fclk guardbands for dynamic variations, the embedded EDS design can exploit path-activation rates to operate the microprocessor faster than infrequently-activated critical paths. The second error-detection design offers a less-intrusive approach for dynamic timing-error detection by placing a tunable replica circuit (TRC) per pipeline stage to monitor worst-case delays. Although the TRCs require a delay guardband to ensure the TRC delay is always slower than critical-path delays, the TRC design captures most of the benefits from the embedded EDS design with less implementation overhead. Furthermore, while core min-delay constraints limit the potential benefits of the embedded EDS design, a salient advantage of the TRC design is the ability to detect a wider range of dynamic delay variation, as demonstrated through low supply voltage (VCC) measurements. Both error-detection designs interface with error-recovery techniques, enabling the detection and correction of timing errors from fast-changing variations such as high-frequency VCC droops. The microprocessor core also supports two separate error-recovery techniques to guarantee correct execution even if dynamic variations persist. The first technique requires clock control to replay errant instructions at 1/2FCLK. In comparison, the second technique is a new multiple-issue instruction replay design that corrects errant instructions with a lower performance penalty and without requiring clock control. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the microprocessor includes a new adaptive clock control circuit that interfaces with the resilient circuits and a phase-locked loop (PLL) to track recovery cycles and adapt to persistent errors by dynamically changing Fclk f°Γ maximum efficiency.

  • Resilient microprocessor design for high performance & energy efficiency
    2010 ACM IEEE International Symposium on Low-Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED), 2010
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    Conventional microprocessors require a clock frequency (FCLK) guardband to ensure correct functionality during infrequent dynamic operating variations in supply voltage (VCC), temperature, and transistor aging. Consequently, these inflexible designs cannot exploit opportunities for higher performance by increasing FCLK or lower energy by reducing VCC during favorable operating conditions. This presentation describes a 45nm resilient microprocessor with error-detection and recovery circuits to detect and correct timing errors from dynamic variations to mitigate the FCLK guardband, thus enabling higher performance or lower energy as compared to a conventional design. The microprocessor core supports two distinct error-detection designs and two separate error-recovery techniques, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the resilient circuits guide an adaptive clock controller that tracks recovery cycles and adapts to persistent variations by changing FCLK. The combination of error-detection and recovery circuits with dynamic adaptation allows the microprocessor to adapt to the operating environment to deliver maximum efficiency. The presentation concludes by discussing the opportunity of applying resilient techniques to enhance the dynamic operating range (i.e., high-performance and low-power modes) for microprocessors.

Carlos Tokunaga – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A 45 nm Resilient Microprocessor Core for Dynamic Variation Tolerance
    IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2011
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    A 45 nm microprocessor core integrates resilient error-detection and recovery circuits to mitigate the clock frequency (FCLK) guardbands for dynamic parameter variations to improve throughput and energy efficiency. The core supports two distinct error-detection designs, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. The first design embeds error-detection sequential (EDS) circuits in critical paths to detect late timing transitions. In addition to reducing the Fclk guardbands for dynamic variations, the embedded EDS design can exploit path-activation rates to operate the microprocessor faster than infrequently-activated critical paths. The second error-detection design offers a less-intrusive approach for dynamic timing-error detection by placing a tunable replica circuit (TRC) per pipeline stage to monitor worst-case delays. Although the TRCs require a delay guardband to ensure the TRC delay is always slower than critical-path delays, the TRC design captures most of the benefits from the embedded EDS design with less implementation overhead. Furthermore, while core min-delay constraints limit the potential benefits of the embedded EDS design, a salient advantage of the TRC design is the ability to detect a wider range of dynamic delay variation, as demonstrated through low supply voltage (VCC) measurements. Both error-detection designs interface with error-recovery techniques, enabling the detection and correction of timing errors from fast-changing variations such as high-frequency VCC droops. The microprocessor core also supports two separate error-recovery techniques to guarantee correct execution even if dynamic variations persist. The first technique requires clock control to replay errant instructions at 1/2FCLK. In comparison, the second technique is a new multiple-issue instruction replay design that corrects errant instructions with a lower performance penalty and without requiring clock control. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the microprocessor includes a new adaptive clock control circuit that interfaces with the resilient circuits and a phase-locked loop (PLL) to track recovery cycles and adapt to persistent errors by dynamically changing Fclk f°Γ maximum efficiency.

  • Resilient microprocessor design for high performance & energy efficiency
    2010 ACM IEEE International Symposium on Low-Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED), 2010
    Co-Authors: Keith A. Bowman, James W. Tschanz, Shih-lien L. Lu, Paolo A. Aseron, Muhammad M. Khellah, Arijit Raychowdhury, Bibiche M. Geuskens, Carlos Tokunaga, Chris B. Wilkerson, Tanay Karnik

    Abstract:

    Conventional microprocessors require a clock frequency (FCLK) guardband to ensure correct functionality during infrequent dynamic operating variations in supply voltage (VCC), temperature, and transistor aging. Consequently, these inflexible designs cannot exploit opportunities for higher performance by increasing FCLK or lower energy by reducing VCC during favorable operating conditions. This presentation describes a 45nm resilient microprocessor with error-detection and recovery circuits to detect and correct timing errors from dynamic variations to mitigate the FCLK guardband, thus enabling higher performance or lower energy as compared to a conventional design. The microprocessor core supports two distinct error-detection designs and two separate error-recovery techniques, allowing a direct comparison of the relative trade-offs. Silicon measurements demonstrate that resilient circuits enable a 41% throughput gain at equal energy or a 22% energy reduction at equal throughput, as compared to a conventional design when executing a Benchmark Program with a 10% VCC droop. In addition, the resilient circuits guide an adaptive clock controller that tracks recovery cycles and adapts to persistent variations by changing FCLK. The combination of error-detection and recovery circuits with dynamic adaptation allows the microprocessor to adapt to the operating environment to deliver maximum efficiency. The presentation concludes by discussing the opportunity of applying resilient techniques to enhance the dynamic operating range (i.e., high-performance and low-power modes) for microprocessors.