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Bending Moment Capacity

The Experts below are selected from a list of 672 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

C A Eckelman – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Withdrawal, shear, and Bending Moment capacities of round mortise and tenon timber framing joints
    Forest Products Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Huseyin Akcay, C A Eckelman, Eva Haviarova

    Abstract:

    An exploratory study was conducted to determine the withdrawal, lateral shear, and Bending Moment capacities of round mortise and tenon timber framing joints containing substantial amounts ofjuvenile wood. Mostjoints were constructed of southern yellow pine. Tenon diameters were 2,3, and 4 inches. Tenon withdrawal capacities of joints with red oak cross pins were about 3,500, 5,000, and 10,000 pounds for 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons, respectively. Joints without shoulders had Bending Moment capacities of about 400, 1,400, and 3,750 ft.-lb. for 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons and capacities of 700, 1,650, and 5,200 ft.-lb. for comparable joints with shoulders. Lateral shear capacities of joints with tenons fully seated were about 3,500, 7,500, and 11,000 pounds for joints with 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons, respectively. Values for comparable joints with 3- and 4-inch tenons not fully seated were about 2,300 and 3,500 pounds, respectively. Results of the study suggest that the round mortise and tenon joints had sufficient withdrawal, shear, and Bending Moment Capacity toj ustify their continued evaluation for use in light timber frames constructed from small-diameter timbers.

  • Statistical Lower Tolerance Limits for Rectangular Mortise and Tenon Joints
    Bioresources, 2016
    Co-Authors: C A Eckelman, Mesut Uysal, Eva Haviarova

    Abstract:

    Tests were conducted to determine the Bending Moment Capacity of 215 red oak and 140 white oak T-shaped rectangular mortise and tenon joints. Rails measured 22.2 mm by 63.5 mm in cross section; tenons measured 32 mm in length by 38 mm in height by 9.5 mm in thickness. Specimens were assembled with a 40% solid content polyvinyl acetate adhesive. The average Bending Moment Capacity of the red oak specimens was 353 Nm with a standard deviation of 48 Nm; in the white oak specimens, it was 358 Nm with a standard deviation of 62 Nm. The lower tolerance limits of the red oak specimens at the 75|75, 90|75, 75|90, 90|90, and 95|95 confidence|proportion levels were 318, 316, 289, 286, and 266 Nm, respectively, whereas in white oak specimens, the values were 314, 308, 273, 268, and 240 Nm, respectively. Overall, the results indicated that the use of statistical lower tolerance limits procedures provide a systematic means of relating standard deviations to mean values in determining reasonable design values for the Moment Capacity of the joints. Conclusions were not reached concerning which confidence|proportion level might be best suited for determining reasonable design values for furniture joints, but the results did illustrate the consequences of a given choice.

  • Bending Moment Capacities of L-Shaped Mortise and Tenon Joints under Compression and Tension Loadings
    Bioresources, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ali Kasal, C A Eckelman, Eva Haviarova, Yusuf Ziya Erdil, İbrahim Yalcin

    Abstract:

    Tests were carried out to determine the Bending Moment capacities of L-shaped mortise and tenon furniture joints under both compression and tension loadings. The effects of wood species (Turkish beech and Scotch pine), adhesive type (polyvinylacetate and polyurethane), and tenon size (width and length) on the static Bending Moment Capacity of joints under the same loading conditions were investigated. The results of the tests indicated that the Moment Capacity increased as either tenon width or length increased. The results also indicated that tenon length had a greater effect on the Moment Capacity than tenon width. In both compression and tension tests, Turkish beech joints were stronger than Scotch pine joints, and PU joints were stronger than PVA joints. An empirically derived expression was developed to estimate the average ultimate Bending Moment Capacity of joints under compression and tension loads as functions of the wood species, the adhesive type, and the tenon size.

Eva Haviarova – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Withdrawal, shear, and Bending Moment capacities of round mortise and tenon timber framing joints
    Forest Products Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Huseyin Akcay, C A Eckelman, Eva Haviarova

    Abstract:

    An exploratory study was conducted to determine the withdrawal, lateral shear, and Bending Moment capacities of round mortise and tenon timber framing joints containing substantial amounts ofjuvenile wood. Mostjoints were constructed of southern yellow pine. Tenon diameters were 2,3, and 4 inches. Tenon withdrawal capacities of joints with red oak cross pins were about 3,500, 5,000, and 10,000 pounds for 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons, respectively. Joints without shoulders had Bending Moment capacities of about 400, 1,400, and 3,750 ft.-lb. for 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons and capacities of 700, 1,650, and 5,200 ft.-lb. for comparable joints with shoulders. Lateral shear capacities of joints with tenons fully seated were about 3,500, 7,500, and 11,000 pounds for joints with 2-, 3-, and 4-inch tenons, respectively. Values for comparable joints with 3- and 4-inch tenons not fully seated were about 2,300 and 3,500 pounds, respectively. Results of the study suggest that the round mortise and tenon joints had sufficient withdrawal, shear, and Bending Moment Capacity toj ustify their continued evaluation for use in light timber frames constructed from small-diameter timbers.

  • Statistical Lower Tolerance Limits for Rectangular Mortise and Tenon Joints
    Bioresources, 2016
    Co-Authors: C A Eckelman, Mesut Uysal, Eva Haviarova

    Abstract:

    Tests were conducted to determine the Bending Moment Capacity of 215 red oak and 140 white oak T-shaped rectangular mortise and tenon joints. Rails measured 22.2 mm by 63.5 mm in cross section; tenons measured 32 mm in length by 38 mm in height by 9.5 mm in thickness. Specimens were assembled with a 40% solid content polyvinyl acetate adhesive. The average Bending Moment Capacity of the red oak specimens was 353 Nm with a standard deviation of 48 Nm; in the white oak specimens, it was 358 Nm with a standard deviation of 62 Nm. The lower tolerance limits of the red oak specimens at the 75|75, 90|75, 75|90, 90|90, and 95|95 confidence|proportion levels were 318, 316, 289, 286, and 266 Nm, respectively, whereas in white oak specimens, the values were 314, 308, 273, 268, and 240 Nm, respectively. Overall, the results indicated that the use of statistical lower tolerance limits procedures provide a systematic means of relating standard deviations to mean values in determining reasonable design values for the Moment Capacity of the joints. Conclusions were not reached concerning which confidence|proportion level might be best suited for determining reasonable design values for furniture joints, but the results did illustrate the consequences of a given choice.

  • Bending Moment Capacities of L-Shaped Mortise and Tenon Joints under Compression and Tension Loadings
    Bioresources, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ali Kasal, C A Eckelman, Eva Haviarova, Yusuf Ziya Erdil, İbrahim Yalcin

    Abstract:

    Tests were carried out to determine the Bending Moment capacities of L-shaped mortise and tenon furniture joints under both compression and tension loadings. The effects of wood species (Turkish beech and Scotch pine), adhesive type (polyvinylacetate and polyurethane), and tenon size (width and length) on the static Bending Moment Capacity of joints under the same loading conditions were investigated. The results of the tests indicated that the Moment Capacity increased as either tenon width or length increased. The results also indicated that tenon length had a greater effect on the Moment Capacity than tenon width. In both compression and tension tests, Turkish beech joints were stronger than Scotch pine joints, and PU joints were stronger than PVA joints. An empirically derived expression was developed to estimate the average ultimate Bending Moment Capacity of joints under compression and tension loads as functions of the wood species, the adhesive type, and the tenon size.

Hamid Valipour – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Experimental study of steel-timber composite beam-to-column joints with extended end plates
    Construction and Building Materials, 2019
    Co-Authors: Abdolreza Ataei, Hamid Valipour, Mark A. Bradford, Alireza A. Chiniforush

    Abstract:

    Abstract This study presents the results of laboratory push-down tests conducted on one pure steel and four steel-timber composite (STC) cruciform subassemblies to assess the failure characteristics, stiffness, flexural resistance and ductility of the extended end plate STC beam-to-column connections subjected to negative (hogging) Bending Moment. In the proposed composite system, the cross -laminated timber (CLT) panels were connected to the top flange of steel girders using coach screws and the steel beams were connected to the steel columns by bolted extended end plates. Moreover, the two juxtaposed CLT slabs (subject to tension) were connected by the mechanically anchored threaded rod and/or surface spline joints with steel plates. The experimental results showed that the extended end plate STC connection have enough rotation Capacity to provide for plastic analysis/design of the STC beams. Furthermore, it was shown that the composite action in conjunction with continuity of timber slab can increase the Bending Moment Capacity of the connection more than 50% of that for a pure steel connection.

  • Semi-rigid partial-strength steel-timber composite (STC) connections with mechanically anchored steel rods
    Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2019
    Co-Authors: F. Nouri, Hamid Valipour

    Abstract:

    Abstract In steel composite constructions, replacing the concrete slabs with prefabricated timber slabs significantly reduces the embodied energy and carbon footprint and lowers the self-weight of the structure and the size of the columns and footings. Considering the advantages of the light-weight steel-timber composite (STC) floors, this paper presents the results of laboratory experiments conducted on six (STC) beam-to-column subassemblies with double angle web cleats and fin plate (nominally-pinned) connections. Preserving continuity of the slabs across the column increases hogging Bending Moment resistance and stiffness of the composite beam to column connections. Here, the connection between the timber slabs across the column was provided by threaded rods placed inside the timber slabs and mechanically anchored in the pockets of cementitious grout. The STC subassemblies were subjected to a monotonically increasing push-down load to simulate behaviour of the nominally-pinned beam-to-column connections. The results of laboratory tests revealed that mechanically anchored rods can be used to effectively transfer the tensile force developed in the timber slabs of the STC floors and accordingly enhance the stiffness and hogging Bending Moment Capacity of the simple STC beam-to-column connections. The effect of the number, size, and strength grade of the steel rods on stiffness, strength and ductility of the STC connections were evaluated experimentally and component-based method was employed to develop a simple mechanical model for predicting the Bending Moment Capacity of the STC connections with mechanically anchored rods.

  • Steel–Timber Composite Beam-to-Column Connections with Shear Tab
    Journal of Structural Engineering-asce, 2019
    Co-Authors: F. Nouri, Mark A. Bradford, Hamid Valipour

    Abstract:

    AbstractThis paper focuses on the structural behavior and negative Bending Moment Capacity of steel–timber composite (STC) beam-to-column connections with shear tabs. It is hypothesized that timber…