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Bioapplications

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2853 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Gordon G Wallace – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • conductive tough hydrogel for Bioapplications
    Macromolecular Bioscience, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Javadi, Qi Gu, Sina Naficy, Syamak Farajikhah, Jeremy M Crook, Gordon G Wallace, Stephen Beirne

    Abstract:

    : Biocompatible conductive tough hydrogels represent a new class of advanced materials combining the properties of tough hydrogels and biocompatible conductors. Here, a simple method, to achieve a self-assembled tough elastomeric composite structure that is biocompatible, conductive, and with high flexibility, is reported. The hydrogel comprises polyether-based liner polyurethane (PU), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS), and liquid crystal graphene oxide (LCGO). The polyurethane hybrid composite (PUHC) containing the PEDOT:PSS, LCGO, and PU has a higher electrical conductivity (10×), tensile modulus (>1.6×), and yield strength (>1.56×) compared to respective control samples. Furthermore, the PUHC is biocompatible and can support human neural stem cell (NSC) growth and differentiation to neurons and supporting neuroglia. Moreover, the stimulation of PUHC enhances NSC differentiation with enhanced neuritogenesis compared to unstimulated cultures. A model describing the synergistic effects of the PUHC components and their influence on the uniformity, biocompatibility, and electromechanical properties of the hydrogel is presented.

  • electrochemical properties of swnt ferritin composite for Bioapplications
    Sensors and Actuators B-chemical, 2008
    Co-Authors: Kwang Min Shin, Gordon G Wallace

    Abstract:

    A functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), fabricated using an acid treatment, was used to prepare SWNT/ferritin composites. Different physical and chemical composites were synthesized on a glassy carbon electrode, and their structures and electrochemical properties were analyzed. The specific redox reaction due to ferritin appeared in both composites, but depended on the structure of the composite, which influenced the electrochemical properties. The redox reaction of ferritin was analyzed using fulfilled core, holoferritin, and coreless, apoferritin. From the electrochemical results, we confirmed that electron transfer through the ferritin shell is possible, and that the core of the ferritin facilitates electron transfer in the composites. The chemical composites showed a significant catalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide, and the electrochemical results show that this type of composite has potential as biosensors and in Bioapplications.

  • Electrochemical properties of SWNT/ferritin composite for Bioapplications
    Sensors and Actuators B-chemical, 2008
    Co-Authors: Kwang Min Shin, Gordon G Wallace

    Abstract:

    A functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), fabricated using an acid treatment, was used to prepare SWNT/ferritin composites. Different physical and chemical composites were synthesized on a glassy carbon electrode, and their structures and electrochemical properties were analyzed. The specific redox reaction due to ferritin appeared in both composites, but depended on the structure of the composite, which influenced the electrochemical properties. The redox reaction of ferritin was analyzed using fulfilled core, holoferritin, and coreless, apoferritin. From the electrochemical results, we confirmed that electron transfer through the ferritin shell is possible, and that the core of the ferritin facilitates electron transfer in the composites. The chemical composites showed a significant catalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide, and the electrochemical results show that this type of composite has potential as biosensors and in Bioapplications.

Yong Zhang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • micropatterning of polystyrene nanoparticles and its Bioapplications
    Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chun Wang, Yong Zhang

    Abstract:

    Micropatterning of biomolecules forms the basis of cell culture, biosensor and microarray technology. Currently, the most widely used techniques are photoresist lithography, soft lithography or using robots which all involve multi-step surface modification directly on a planar substrate. Here we report a method to pattern biomolecules through self-assembling polystyrene nanoparticles in arrayed microwells on a solid surface to form well-ordered patterning, followed by attaching biomolecules to the assembled nanoparticles. The formation of colloidal patterns depends on capillary force, surface wettability and physical confinement. This method can be used for micropatterning a variety of biomolecules such as protein and antibody.

  • Micropatterning of polystyrene nanoparticles and its Bioapplications
    Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chun Wang, F. L. Yap, Yong Zhang

    Abstract:

    Micropatterning of biomolecules forms the basis of cell culture, biosensor and microarray technology. Currently, the most widely used techniques are photoresist lithography, soft lithography or using robots which all involve multi-step surface modification directly on a planar substrate. Here we report a method to pattern biomolecules through self-assembling polystyrene nanoparticles in arrayed microwells on a solid surface to form well-ordered patterning, followed by attaching biomolecules to the assembled nanoparticles. The formation of colloidal patterns depends on capillary force, surface wettability and physical confinement. This method can be used for micropatterning a variety of biomolecules such as protein and antibody. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Meixiu Li – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • π π stacking interaction a nondestructive and facile means in material engineering for Bioapplications
    Crystal Growth & Design, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tao Chen, Meixiu Li

    Abstract:

    π–π stacking interactions, as a kind of attractive and nondestructive noncovalent interaction, have been widely explored for the applications in modern chemistry, molecular biology, and supramolecular armamentarium, among which their Bioapplications have attracted tremendous attention due to the unique advantages such as strong binding force, nondestructive fabrication process, and simple operation. Impressively, great achievements have been made in the area of nucleobase stacking, biosensing, controlled drug release, protein folding, molecular recognition, self-assembly, template-directed synthesis. etc. In this review, we first discuss the characterization, geometric configurations, and requirements for π–π stacking interactions, and then focus on their typical Bioapplications in material engineering in particular. At the end, the outlook for potential applications of π–π stacking interactions is also discussed.

  • π–π Stacking Interaction: A Nondestructive and Facile Means in Material Engineering for Bioapplications
    Crystal Growth & Design, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tao Chen, Meixiu Li

    Abstract:

    π–π stacking interactions, as a kind of attractive and nondestructive noncovalent interaction, have been widely explored for the applications in modern chemistry, molecular biology, and supramolecular armamentarium, among which their Bioapplications have attracted tremendous attention due to the unique advantages such as strong binding force, nondestructive fabrication process, and simple operation. Impressively, great achievements have been made in the area of nucleobase stacking, biosensing, controlled drug release, protein folding, molecular recognition, self-assembly, template-directed synthesis. etc. In this review, we first discuss the characterization, geometric configurations, and requirements for π–π stacking interactions, and then focus on their typical Bioapplications in material engineering in particular. At the end, the outlook for potential applications of π–π stacking interactions is also discussed.