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Bioburden

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3276 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Marie S Tuttle – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • use of 16s rrna sequencing and quantitative pcr to correlate venous leg ulcer bacterial Bioburden dynamics with wound expansion antibiotic therapy and healing
    Wound Repair and Regeneration, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Sprockett, Christine G Ammons, Marie S Tuttle

    Abstract:

    Clinical diagnosis of infection in chronic wounds is currently limited to subjective clinical signs and culture-based methods that underestimate the complexity of wound microbial Bioburden as revealed by DNA-based microbial identification methods. Here, we use 16S rRNA next generation sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to characterize weekly changes in bacterial load, community structure, and diversity associated with a chronic venous leg ulcer over the 15-week course of treatment and healing. Our DNA-based methods and detailed sampling scheme reveal that the bacterial Bioburden of the wound is unexpectedly dynamic, including changes in the bacterial load and community structure that correlate with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing. We demonstrate that these multidimensional changes in bacterial Bioburden can be summarized using swabs taken prior to debridement, and therefore, can be more easily collected serially than debridement or biopsy samples. Overall, this case illustrates the importance of detailed clinical indicators and longitudinal sampling to determine the pathogenic significance of chronic wound microbial dynamics and guide best use of antimicrobials for improvement of healing outcomes.

  • association between microbial Bioburden and healing outcomes in venous leg ulcers a review of the evidence
    Advances in wound care, 2015
    Co-Authors: Marie S Tuttle

    Abstract:

    Significance: Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are susceptible to microbial invasion, and serious complications can result without the timely control of infection. Diagnosis of wound infection is primarily based on subjective clinical characteristics and patient-reported symptoms, and the treatment with antimicrobials has not consistently shown improvement in healing outcomes. This is a review of studies using bacterial cultures and/or new molecular-based methods associating microbial Bioburden with healing outcomes in VLU patients, with the goal of guiding future studies to better determine significant patterns of microbial involvement in chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Studies reviewed here use cultivation-based identification of bacteria and next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to gain insight into microbial Bioburden in VLUs. Further application of sophisticated DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analyses has the potential to revolutionize our ability to further discern, with high resoluti…

Richard White – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Flaminal ® : a novel approach to wound Bioburden control
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Richard White

    Abstract:

    Modern wound management requires that systematic assessment and treatment approaches be adopted in order to address the needs of the wound in a logical way. The frameworks of wound bed preparation using the TIME acronym (Dowsett and Ayello, 2004) and Applied Wound Management (Gray et al, 2006) are two such systems. Both require the assessment and management of the tissues in the wound (e.g. slough, necrosis), the control of exudate and an assessment and control of Bioburden, as appropriate.

  • wound dressings and other topical treatment modalities in Bioburden control
    Journal of Wound Care, 2011
    Co-Authors: Richard White

    Abstract:

    This is a chapter taken from the book Microbiology of Wounds, published by CRC Press in 2010. It has traditionally been the case that reduction of wound Bioburden has been achieved by the use of a topical antimicrobial agent, such as bactericidal antiseptics or antibiotics. This has worked well for many years, however, there are concerns about toxicity and resistance, which have prompted research into other mechanisms. There are various means of removing bacteria from the wound, without recourse to chemical agents; for example, larvae (maggots) ingest bacteria, together with the devitalised tissue of the wound. The control of exudate restricts the availability of free water, impeding the growth of those water-loving bacteria such as the staphylococci and pseudomonads. The discovery that some materials selectively adsorb, or sequester, bacteria has led to the development of bacteriostatic dressing materials, which do not rely on antiseptics for their action. These are designed to physically remove microorganisms, such as bacteria, from the wound, thus reducing Bioburden. However, this still demands validation as a clinically relevant mechanism. Until that time, it remains a fascinating theoretical concept.

  • flaminal a novel approach to wound Bioburden control
    , 2006
    Co-Authors: Richard White

    Abstract:

    Modern wound management requires that systematic assessment and treatment approaches be adopted in order to address the needs of the wound in a logical way. The frameworks of wound bed preparation using the TIME acronym (Dowsett and Ayello, 2004) and Applied Wound Management (Gray et al, 2006) are two such systems. Both require the assessment and management of the tissues in the wound (e.g. slough, necrosis), the control of exudate and an assessment and control of Bioburden, as appropriate.

Christine Moissleichinger – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • quantification of encapsulated Bioburden in spacecraft polymer materials by cultivation dependent and molecular methods
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Anja Bauermeister, Christine Moissleichinger, Alexander Mahnert, Anna K Auerbach, Alexander Boker, Niwin Flier, Christina Weber, Alexander J Probst, Klaus Haberer

    Abstract:

    Bioburden encapsulated in spacecraft polymers (such as adhesives and coatings) poses a potential risk to jeopardize scientific exploration of other celestial bodies. This is particularly critical for spacecraft components intended for hard landing. So far, it remained unclear if polymers are indeed a source of microbial contamination. In addition, data with respect to survival of microbes during the embedding/polymerization process are sparse. In this study we developed testing strategies to quantitatively examine encapsulated Bioburden in five different polymers used frequently and in large quantities on spaceflight hardware. As quantitative extraction of the Bioburden from polymerized (solid) materials did not prove feasible, contaminants were extracted from uncured precursors. Cultivation-based analyses revealed <0.1–2.5 colony forming units (cfu) per cm3 polymer, whereas quantitative PCR-based detection of contaminants indicated considerably higher values, despite low DNA extraction efficiency. Results obtained from this approach reflect the most conservative proxy for encapsulated Bioburden, as they give the maximum Bioburden of the polymers irrespective of any additional physical and chemical stress occurring during polymerization. To address the latter issue, we deployed an embedding model to elucidate and monitor the physiological status of embedded Bacillus safensis spores in a cured polymer. Staining approaches using AlexaFluor succinimidyl ester 488 (AF488), propidium monoazide (PMA), CTC (5-cyano-2,3-diotolyl tetrazolium chloride) demonstrated that embedded spores retained integrity, germination and cultivation ability even after polymerization of the adhesive Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A. Using the methods presented here, we were able to estimate the worst case contribution of encapsulated Bioburden in different polymers to the Bioburden of spacecraft. We demonstrated that spores were not affected by polymerization processes. Besides Planetary Protection considerations, our results could prove useful for the manufacturing of food packaging, pharmacy industry and implant technology.

  • insights into the microbial diversity and Bioburden in a south american spacecraft assembly clean room
    Astrobiology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Petra Schwendner, Christine Moissleichinger, Simon Barczyk, Maria Bohmeier, Rüdiger Pukall, Petra Rettberg

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this study, samples from the spacecraft assembly clean room BAF (final assembly building), located at Centre Spatial Guyanais in Kourou, French Guiana, were characterized by qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the Bioburden and biodiversity. The cultivation assays mainly focused on extremotolerant microorganisms that have special metabolic skills, such as the ability to grow without oxygen, fix nitrogen, grow autotrophically, or reduce sulfate. A broad range of media and growth conditions were used to simulate possible extraterrestrial environments and clean room buildings. In addition to these alternative cultivation assays, the ESA standard protocol for Bioburden estimation was also applied. The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates (mainly facultative anaerobes) showed an extraordinarily broad cultivable biodiversity. Overall, 49 species were isolated and identified as members of the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, α-, β-, γ-Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes/Chloro…

  • abundance and diversity of microbial inhabitants in european spacecraft associated clean rooms
    Astrobiology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Michaela Stieglmeier, Petra Rettberg, Simon Barczyk, Maria Bohmeier, Rüdiger Pukall, Reinhard Wirth, Christine Moissleichinger

    Abstract:

    Abstract The determination of the microbial load of a spacecraft en route to interesting extraterrestrial environments is mandatory and currently based on the culturable, heat-shock-surviving portion of microbial contaminants. Our study compared these classical Bioburden measurements as required by NASA’s and ESA’s guidelines for the microbial examination of flight hardware, with molecular analysis methods (16S rRNA gene cloning and quantitative PCR) to further develop our understanding of the diversity and abundance of the microbial communities of spacecraft-associated clean rooms. Three samplings of the Herschel Space Observatory and its surrounding clean rooms were performed in two different European facilities. Molecular analyses detected a broad diversity of microbes typically found in the human microbiome with three bacterial genera (Staphylococcus, Propionibacterium, and Brevundimonas) common to all three locations. Bioburden measurements revealed a low, but heterogeneous, abundance of spore-formin…