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Bladder Filling

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J J Wyndaele – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Urological Neurology and Urodynamics THE NORMAL PATTERN OF PERCEPTION OF Bladder Filling DURING CYSTOMETRY STUDIED IN 38 YOUNG HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: J J Wyndaele

    Abstract:

    Purpose: The normal pattern of sensation during the tonic phase of cystometric Bladder Filling was evaluated in a group of young healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 38 healthy volunteers 19 to 28 years old described the sensations they perceived while sitting during medium fill cystometry after the Bladder was filled through a urethral catheter with saline at body temperature. Results: Of the subjects 4 had unstable Bladder contractions that corresponded with some sensations reported, and 34 with a stable Bladder perceived a first sensation of Filling, first desire to void and strong desire to void. Each sensation was easily distinguishable from the others. Bladder volumes at the different sensations as well as detrusor pressures strongly correlated with each other. Conclusions: Although sensations reported during cystometric Bladder Filling are subjective, they have a normal pattern. Since these sensations are easily distinguished from each other and occur at interrelated volumes, they probably correspond with specific physiological mechanisms as suggested previously. Therefore, evaluation of these sensations could provide additional relevant information during urodynamics. It has been described previously that Bladder distension can evoke sensations, particularly those related to stretch and distension, of varying quality and origin.13 Adequate sensory input is the prerequisite for conscious Bladder control,4 and pathological Bladder sensation may cause serious symptoms and complications.S.6 Therefore, the evaluation of sensation is clinically useful. Sensations reported during urodynamic investigations are subjective and investigators might be cautious about their diagnostic value. Although some technical investigations are currently used to evaluate objectively sensory innervation of the lower urinary tract,7 they do not involve the perception of sensations, such as desire to void and of full Bladder, which guide daily urinary behavior. Bladder Filling sensation was studied in a group of healthy volunteers to determine the value of this investigative technique.

  • the normal pattern of perception of Bladder Filling during cystometry studied in 38 young healthy volunteers
    The Journal of Urology, 1998
    Co-Authors: J J Wyndaele

    Abstract:

    AbstractPurpose: The normal pattern of sensation during the tonic phase of cystometric Bladder Filling was evaluated in a group of young healthy volunteers.Materials and Methods: A total of 38 healthy volunteers 19 to 28 years old described the sensations they perceived while sitting during medium fill cystometry after the Bladder was filled through a urethral catheter with saline at body temperature.Results: Of the subjects 4 had unstable Bladder contractions that corresponded with some sensations reported, and 34 with a stable Bladder perceived a first sensation of Filling, first desire to void and strong desire to void. Each sensation was easily distinguishable from the others. Bladder volumes at the different sensations as well as detrusor pressures strongly correlated with each other.Conclusions: Although sensations reported during cystometric Bladder Filling are subjective, they have a normal pattern. Since these sensations are easily distinguished from each other and occur at interrelated volumes, …

  • is impaired perception of Bladder Filling during cystometry a sign of neuropathy
    BJUI, 1993
    Co-Authors: J J Wyndaele

    Abstract:

    Summary— The sensation of Bladder Filling during cystometry was evaluated in 627 consecutive patients. The groups of patients with various patterns of impaired sensation included significantly more patients with confirmed neuropathy than did the group whose perception of Bladder Filling was normal. When sensation was absent, or only 1 of 3 types was reported by patients without known neuropathy, further investigation revealed abnormal afferent innervation of the lower urinary tract in 35%. These data suggest the need for further neurological evaluation in such patients.

Ulrich Mehnert – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is detrusor contraction during rapid Bladder Filling caused by cold or warm water a randomized controlled double blind trial
    The Journal of Urology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Marko Kozomara, Ulrich Mehnert, Burkhardt Seifert, Thomas M. Kessler

    Abstract:

    Purpose: We investigated whether detrusor contraction during rapid Bladder Filling is provoked by cold or warm water.Materials and Methods: Patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction were included in this randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. At the end of a standard urodynamic investigation patients underwent 2 Bladder Fillings using a 4C ice water test or a 36C warm water test saline solution at a Filling speed of 100 ml per minute. The order was randomly selected, and patients and investigators were blinded to the order. The primary outcome measure was detrusor overactivity, maximum detrusor pressure and maximum Bladder Filling volume during the ice and warm water tests.Results: Nine women and 31 men were the subject of data analysis. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction was caused by spinal cord injury in 33 patients and by another neurological disorder in 7. Irrespective of test order detrusor overactivity occurred significantly more often during the ice water test than duri…

  • PD06-11 REPRODUCIBILITY OF SUPRASPINAL RESPONSES TO AUTOMATED, REPETITIVE Bladder Filling – AN FMRI STUDY
    The Journal of Urology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Matthias Walter, Lorenz Leitner, Lars Michels, Spyros Kollias, Patrick Freund, Martina D. Liechti, Thomas M. Kessler, Ulrich Mehnert

    Abstract:

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies revealed supraspinal networks in response to Bladder Filling involved in perception and processing of Bladder distension. However, reproducibility of blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes during Bladder Filling has not been proven yet. Therefore, our aim was to investigate BOLD signal changes in response to Bladder Filling to provide evidence for repeatability using a standardized Filling paradigm, i.e. a magnetic resonance (MR)compatible and MR-synchronized infusion-drainage system. METHODS: 20 right-handed healthy subjects, 10 women and 10 men, mean age 39 years (range 22-54) with no history of urinary urgency and/or urinary incontinence were included. Visit 1: After catheterization and Bladder pre-Filling with body warm saline until persistent desire to void, we performed in a 3T MR scanner automated, repetitive Bladder Filling of 100mL body warm saline over 15s, i.e. block design study. Visit 2: Within 8 weeks from visit 1, a second MR scan was performed in the same manner. Using SPM8, BOLD signal changes during Bladder Filling were compared to rest, i.e. pre-filled condition. For within-group whole-brain (WB) analysis, a voxel-threshold was set at p

  • pd06 11 reproducibility of supraspinal responses to automated repetitive Bladder Filling an fmri study
    The Journal of Urology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Matthias Walter, Lorenz Leitner, Lars Michels, Spyros Kollias, Patrick Freund, Martina D. Liechti, Thomas M. Kessler, Ulrich Mehnert

    Abstract:

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies revealed supraspinal networks in response to Bladder Filling involved in perception and processing of Bladder distension. However, reproducibility of blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes during Bladder Filling has not been proven yet. Therefore, our aim was to investigate BOLD signal changes in response to Bladder Filling to provide evidence for repeatability using a standardized Filling paradigm, i.e. a magnetic resonance (MR)compatible and MR-synchronized infusion-drainage system. METHODS: 20 right-handed healthy subjects, 10 women and 10 men, mean age 39 years (range 22-54) with no history of urinary urgency and/or urinary incontinence were included. Visit 1: After catheterization and Bladder pre-Filling with body warm saline until persistent desire to void, we performed in a 3T MR scanner automated, repetitive Bladder Filling of 100mL body warm saline over 15s, i.e. block design study. Visit 2: Within 8 weeks from visit 1, a second MR scan was performed in the same manner. Using SPM8, BOLD signal changes during Bladder Filling were compared to rest, i.e. pre-filled condition. For within-group whole-brain (WB) analysis, a voxel-threshold was set at p<0.001 using the false discovery rate (FDR) correction to adjust for multiple comparisons. Differences between both visits were investigated using a paired t test. In addition, regions of interest (ROI) were defined using the Wake Forrest University Pickatlas and included as a mask in order to restrict the voxel-by-voxel statistical analysis (familywise error (FWE)-correction) to pre-specified brain areas. RESULTS: Within-group WB analysis revealed activation in the following brain areas for visit 1: bilateral prefrontal gyrus (PFG); anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), mid and posterior cingulate cortex; left insula; hippocampus; temporal and parietal gyrus; and for visit 2: bilateral PFG; ACC; bilateral insula; bilateral basal ganglia. No statistical differences in BOLD signal changes were detected between both visits. ROI analyses, a more sensitive approach, detected reproducibility of BOLD signal changes in the following areas: PFG, ACC and insula. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that automated, repetitive Bladder Filling of body warm saline using a MR-compatible and MRsynchronized infusion-drainage system shows reproducible BOLD signal changes in specific areas, known from previous neuroimaging studies to be involved in supraspinal lower urinary tract control.

A G Visser – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bladder Filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer can the use of a Bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize Bladder Filling
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2006
    Co-Authors: Marcel R Stam, Lisette P Van Der Vight, Johannes H A M Kaanders, A G Visser

    Abstract:

    PURPOSE: To investigate the use of a Bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible Bladder Filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: First, the accuracy of the Bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily Bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant Bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and Bladder Filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. RESULTS: A strong correlation between Bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily Bladder volume variation was very high (1 SD = 47.2%). Bladder Filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between Bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows large variations in daily Bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in Bladder volume variation. Even so, the Bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.