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Blocking Diode

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Frederik C Krebs – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • life cycle analysis of product integrated polymer solar cells
    Energy and Environmental Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nieves Espinosa, Rafael Garciavalverde, Frederik C Krebs

    Abstract:

    A life cycle analysis (LCA) on a product integrated polymer solar module is carried out in this study. These assessments are well-known to be useful in developmental stages of a product in order to identify the bottlenecks for the up-scaling in its production phase for several aspects spanning from economics through design to functionality. An LCA study was performed to quantify the energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity use in the manufacture of a light-weight lamp based on a plastic foil, a lithium-polymer battery, a polymer solar cell, printed circuitry, Blocking Diode, switch and a white light emitting semiconductor Diode. The polymer solar cell employed in this prototype presents a power conversion efficiency in the range of 2 to 3% yielding energy payback times (EPBT) in the range of 1.3–2 years. Based on this it is worthwhile to undertake a life-cycle study on the complete product integrated polymer solar cell. We have compared this portable lighting system with other lighting solutions, namely: a kerosene lamp in a remote rural area in Africa (Ethiopia), as a replacement of a silicon PV based lamp, in place of a torch with non-rechargeable lead-acid battery and instead of a battery charging station. The analysis reveals that the OPV lamp has a significant advantage provided that some of the challenges facing this novel technology are efficiently met such that it can enter the market of portable lighting devices.

  • Product integration of compact roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules: methods and manufacture using flexographic printing, slot-die coating and rotary screen printing
    Journal of Materials Chemistry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Frederik C Krebs, Jan Fyenbo, Mikkel Jorgensen

    Abstract:

    The improvement of the performance of roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules through miniaturization of the device outline is described. The devices were prepared using full roll-to-roll processing comprising flexographic printing, slot-die coating and rotary screen printing to create 5 mm wide lines of ZnO, P3HT:[60/70]PCBM, PEDOT:PSS and silver on an ITO-PET substrate. The lines were spaced by 1 mm and the devices were completed by encapsulation using roll-to-roll lamination on both sides using a pressure sensitive adhesive and a multilayered barrier material having a UV-filter with a cut-off at 390 nm, oxygen and water vapor transmission rates of respectively 0.01 cm3 m-2 bar-1 day-1 and 0.04 g m-2 day-1. The final modules comprised 16 serially connected cells. The technical yield was 89% based on the criterion that the Voc had to be larger than 7.2 V. This set of modules gave respectively a voltage, current, fill factor and power conversion efficiency of 8.47 +/- 0.41 V, -23.20 +/- 4.10 mA, 35.4 +/- 2.8% and 1.96 +/- 0.34% in the case of modules based on P3HT:[60]PCBM. A total of 1960 modules were prepared for each run and the best power conversion reached was 2.75% for devices based on P3HT:[70]PCBM. The solar cell modules were used to demonstrate the complete manufacture of a small lamp entirely using techniques of flexible electronics. The solar cell module was used to charge a polymer lithium ion battery through a Blocking Diode. The entire process was fully automated and demonstrates the capacity of polymer solar cells in the context of flexible and printed electronics. Finally a comparison was made between the learning curve for OPV and crystalline silicon solar cells in terms of the cost per watt peak and the cumulative watt peak. OPV as a technology was found to have a significantly steeper learning curve.

Mikkel Jorgensen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Product integration of compact roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules: methods and manufacture using flexographic printing, slot-die coating and rotary screen printing
    Journal of Materials Chemistry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Frederik C Krebs, Jan Fyenbo, Mikkel Jorgensen

    Abstract:

    The improvement of the performance of roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules through miniaturization of the device outline is described. The devices were prepared using full roll-to-roll processing comprising flexographic printing, slot-die coating and rotary screen printing to create 5 mm wide lines of ZnO, P3HT:[60/70]PCBM, PEDOT:PSS and silver on an ITO-PET substrate. The lines were spaced by 1 mm and the devices were completed by encapsulation using roll-to-roll lamination on both sides using a pressure sensitive adhesive and a multilayered barrier material having a UV-filter with a cut-off at 390 nm, oxygen and water vapor transmission rates of respectively 0.01 cm3 m-2 bar-1 day-1 and 0.04 g m-2 day-1. The final modules comprised 16 serially connected cells. The technical yield was 89% based on the criterion that the Voc had to be larger than 7.2 V. This set of modules gave respectively a voltage, current, fill factor and power conversion efficiency of 8.47 +/- 0.41 V, -23.20 +/- 4.10 mA, 35.4 +/- 2.8% and 1.96 +/- 0.34% in the case of modules based on P3HT:[60]PCBM. A total of 1960 modules were prepared for each run and the best power conversion reached was 2.75% for devices based on P3HT:[70]PCBM. The solar cell modules were used to demonstrate the complete manufacture of a small lamp entirely using techniques of flexible electronics. The solar cell module was used to charge a polymer lithium ion battery through a Blocking Diode. The entire process was fully automated and demonstrates the capacity of polymer solar cells in the context of flexible and printed electronics. Finally a comparison was made between the learning curve for OPV and crystalline silicon solar cells in terms of the cost per watt peak and the cumulative watt peak. OPV as a technology was found to have a significantly steeper learning curve.

Nieves Espinosa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • life cycle analysis of product integrated polymer solar cells
    Energy and Environmental Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nieves Espinosa, Rafael Garciavalverde, Frederik C Krebs

    Abstract:

    A life cycle analysis (LCA) on a product integrated polymer solar module is carried out in this study. These assessments are well-known to be useful in developmental stages of a product in order to identify the bottlenecks for the up-scaling in its production phase for several aspects spanning from economics through design to functionality. An LCA study was performed to quantify the energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity use in the manufacture of a light-weight lamp based on a plastic foil, a lithium-polymer battery, a polymer solar cell, printed circuitry, Blocking Diode, switch and a white light emitting semiconductor Diode. The polymer solar cell employed in this prototype presents a power conversion efficiency in the range of 2 to 3% yielding energy payback times (EPBT) in the range of 1.3–2 years. Based on this it is worthwhile to undertake a life-cycle study on the complete product integrated polymer solar cell. We have compared this portable lighting system with other lighting solutions, namely: a kerosene lamp in a remote rural area in Africa (Ethiopia), as a replacement of a silicon PV based lamp, in place of a torch with non-rechargeable lead-acid battery and instead of a battery charging station. The analysis reveals that the OPV lamp has a significant advantage provided that some of the challenges facing this novel technology are efficiently met such that it can enter the market of portable lighting devices.