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Boletus edulis

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Emilia Bernaś – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • composition and antioxidant properties of wild mushrooms Boletus edulis and xerocomus badius prepared for consumption
    Journal of Food Science and Technology-mysore, 2015
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Aleksandra Skrzypczak, Krystyna Pogon, Emilia Bernaś

    Abstract:

    Wild edible mushrooms Boletus edulis and Xerocomus badius were prepared for consumption by braising with 10 % canola oil (half of the batch was blanched prior to braising). Fresh X.badius had comparable to B.edulis amounts of proximate components and higher levels of most B-group vitamins and antioxidants. Analyzed mushrooms prepared for consumption fulfilled 7–14 % RDA of vitamin B1 for healthy adults and 15–35, 18–37 and 1 % RDA of B2, B3 and B3 respectively. Prepared for consumption mushrooms were rich in antioxidants containing in 100 g dry weight 164,601 mg total polyphenols, 19–87 mg total flavonoids, 22.1–27.4 mg L-ascorbic acid, 0.531–1.031 mg β-carotene, 0.325–0.456 mg lycopene and 38.64–44.49 mg total tocopherols and presented high antioxidant activity against ABTS (4.9–36.5 mmol TE), against DPPH (7.8–21.3 mmol TE) and in FRAP assay (15.0–28.1 mmol Fe2+). Mushrooms prepared for consumption with blanching prior to culinary treatment showed lower antioxidant properties and vitamin content in comparison to mushrooms braised raw.

  • effect of different drying methods and 24 month storage on water activity rehydration capacity and antioxidants in Boletus edulis mushrooms
    Drying Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Emilia Bernaś, Krystyna Pogon, Aleksandra Skrzypczak

    Abstract:

    This article evaluates the effect of air drying, freeze drying, and 24-month storage at 4 and 20 ∘ C on unblanched and blanched Boletus edulis . Water content and activity were lower in freeze-dried mushrooms than in air-dried mushrooms, whereas rehydration capacity showed the opposite tendency. Drying resulted in substantial losses of the following antioxidants: total flavonoids (4–7%), vitamin C (2–36%), β-carotene (26–32%), and total tocopherols (72–81%); total polyphenols increased during air drying (7–17%) and decreased during freeze drying (5–7%). Antioxidant activity increased 1–33% during drying. Storage led to further changes in the quality of dried mushrooms. After 24 months, no vitamin C or tocopherols were detected, and water content and activity were moderately high.

  • comparison of the texture of fresh and preserved agaricus bisporus and Boletus edulis mushrooms
    International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Emilia Bernaś, Adriana Biernacka, Ireneusz Maciejaszek

    Abstract:

    Summary

    This work compares changes during the production process and storage period in the texture of canned Agaricus bisporus and Boletus edulis mushrooms previously blanched in water, blanched or soaked and blanched in solutions containing citric, l-ascorbic and lactic acids. The texture was examined using instruments [textural profile analysis (TPA), Kramer shear cell (KSC)] and sensory analysis [five-point, profiling (P)]. Canning B. edulis mushrooms reduced their hardness, chewiness and gumminess (TPA), the values for force and work (KC), and brittleness and crispiness (P), although increasing their cohesiveness (TPA). Canning A. bisporus mushrooms reduced their hardness (TPA) and the expenditure of work, but increased their cohesiveness, hardness, crispiness and firmness (P). Twelve-month storage of both species of canned mushrooms led to a reduction in brittleness and crispiness (P). The type of pre-treatment applied affected the texture only when determined using profile analysis, and significant differences in hardness, crispiness and firmness between blanched-only and soaked and blanched products were mainly found in B. edulis.

Grazyna Jaworska – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • composition and antioxidant properties of wild mushrooms Boletus edulis and xerocomus badius prepared for consumption
    Journal of Food Science and Technology-mysore, 2015
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Aleksandra Skrzypczak, Krystyna Pogon, Emilia Bernaś

    Abstract:

    Wild edible mushrooms Boletus edulis and Xerocomus badius were prepared for consumption by braising with 10 % canola oil (half of the batch was blanched prior to braising). Fresh X.badius had comparable to B.edulis amounts of proximate components and higher levels of most B-group vitamins and antioxidants. Analyzed mushrooms prepared for consumption fulfilled 7–14 % RDA of vitamin B1 for healthy adults and 15–35, 18–37 and 1 % RDA of B2, B3 and B3 respectively. Prepared for consumption mushrooms were rich in antioxidants containing in 100 g dry weight 164,601 mg total polyphenols, 19–87 mg total flavonoids, 22.1–27.4 mg L-ascorbic acid, 0.531–1.031 mg β-carotene, 0.325–0.456 mg lycopene and 38.64–44.49 mg total tocopherols and presented high antioxidant activity against ABTS (4.9–36.5 mmol TE), against DPPH (7.8–21.3 mmol TE) and in FRAP assay (15.0–28.1 mmol Fe2+). Mushrooms prepared for consumption with blanching prior to culinary treatment showed lower antioxidant properties and vitamin content in comparison to mushrooms braised raw.

  • effect of different drying methods and 24 month storage on water activity rehydration capacity and antioxidants in Boletus edulis mushrooms
    Drying Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Emilia Bernaś, Krystyna Pogon, Aleksandra Skrzypczak

    Abstract:

    This article evaluates the effect of air drying, freeze drying, and 24-month storage at 4 and 20 ∘ C on unblanched and blanched Boletus edulis . Water content and activity were lower in freeze-dried mushrooms than in air-dried mushrooms, whereas rehydration capacity showed the opposite tendency. Drying resulted in substantial losses of the following antioxidants: total flavonoids (4–7%), vitamin C (2–36%), β-carotene (26–32%), and total tocopherols (72–81%); total polyphenols increased during air drying (7–17%) and decreased during freeze drying (5–7%). Antioxidant activity increased 1–33% during drying. Storage led to further changes in the quality of dried mushrooms. After 24 months, no vitamin C or tocopherols were detected, and water content and activity were moderately high.

  • comparison of the texture of fresh and preserved agaricus bisporus and Boletus edulis mushrooms
    International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jaworska, Emilia Bernaś, Adriana Biernacka, Ireneusz Maciejaszek

    Abstract:

    Summary

    This work compares changes during the production process and storage period in the texture of canned Agaricus bisporus and Boletus edulis mushrooms previously blanched in water, blanched or soaked and blanched in solutions containing citric, l-ascorbic and lactic acids. The texture was examined using instruments [textural profile analysis (TPA), Kramer shear cell (KSC)] and sensory analysis [five-point, profiling (P)]. Canning B. edulis mushrooms reduced their hardness, chewiness and gumminess (TPA), the values for force and work (KC), and brittleness and crispiness (P), although increasing their cohesiveness (TPA). Canning A. bisporus mushrooms reduced their hardness (TPA) and the expenditure of work, but increased their cohesiveness, hardness, crispiness and firmness (P). Twelve-month storage of both species of canned mushrooms led to a reduction in brittleness and crispiness (P). The type of pre-treatment applied affected the texture only when determined using profile analysis, and significant differences in hardness, crispiness and firmness between blanched-only and soaked and blanched products were mainly found in B. edulis.

Minglong Yuan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Evaluation of biodegradable film packaging to improve the shelf-life of Boletus edulis wild edible mushrooms
    Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, 2015
    Co-Authors: Linlei Han, Yuyue Qin, Dong Liu, Haiyun Chen, Hongli Li, Minglong Yuan

    Abstract:

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) based biodegradable film packaging combining 0.5% nisin antimicrobial polypeptide on the physicochemical and microbial quality of Boletus edulis wild edible mushrooms stored at 4 ± 1 °C. The experiment was set up by packaging mushrooms with extruded PLA films containing 0, 7.5, and 15 wt.% triethyl citrate plasticizer. The low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film was used as the control. Mushrooms stored in PLA films containing 7.5 and 15 wt.% plasticizer provided better retention of quality characteristics and received higher sensory ratings compared to mushrooms stored in pure PLA film and LDPE film. Samples with these two treatments underwent minimal changes in texture, PPO activity, total bacteria count, and sensory attributes. Results suggest that nisin in combination with plasticized PLA film has the potential to maintain B. edulis wild edible mushroom quality and extend its postharvest life to 18 days. Industrial relevance B. edulis is one of the most commercialized mushrooms worldwide. However, as with all fresh mushrooms, there are severe preservation problems. Extruded PLA films containing triethyl citrate plasticizer plus antimicrobial agent nisin proved to be a suitable technology for mushroom conservation. This material exhibits an environmental-friendliness potential and a high versatility in food packaging.