Butterfly Needle - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Butterfly Needle

The Experts below are selected from a list of 213 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Andrew Macmillan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A Prospective Comparison Study a Butterfly Needle and a Teflon for Subcutaneous Narcotic Administration
    , 1994
    Co-Authors: Karen Macmillan, Eduardo Bruera, Norma Kuehn, Pat Selmser, Andrew Macmillan

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the hypothesis that subcutaneous sites initiated with the Tefron cana 9:82-84. Subcutaneous, butterjZy Needle, Teflon cannula, duration, comfort

  • a prospective comparison study between a Butterfly Needle and a teflon cannula for subcutaneous narcotic administration
    Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 1994
    Co-Authors: Karen Macmillan, Eduardo Bruera, Norma Kuehn, Pat Selmser, Andrew Macmillan

    Abstract:

    Abstract To evaluate the hypothesis that subcutaneous sites initiated with the Teflon cannula would have longer durations and be more comfortable for the patient than the Butterfly Needle, we performed a prospective randomized crossover trial to compare the 25-gauge Butterfly Needle to a Teflon cannula with a 26-gauge introducer Needle and a 24-gauge cannula. The analysis of 20 patients showed that duration of the subcutaneous site was significantly longer with the Teflon cannula. Both patients and nurses preferred the Teflon cannula because it did not need to be changed as frequently. There was no difference reported in the level of comfort.

Alfredo J. Lucendo – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differences in Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) measures depending on the device used in blood samples drawn (direct Vacutainer® versus Butterfly Needle): A Randomized Comparative Study
    International Journal of Nursing, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ana Belen Friginal, Ángel Arias, Bolívar L. Díaz-jordán, Ana Rosa López-quiñones, M José Romero-pino, Alfredo J. Lucendo

    Abstract:

     Background. Most laboratory errors occur during the pre-analytical phase and are often related to the blood drawn equipment. No studies have evaluated yet the influence of the most common vein puncture devices on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). We aimed to compare APTT when venous blood samples are drawn with two different Needle devices (direct Vacutainer® versus Butterfly Needle). Methods. Consecutive adult healthy volunteers were prospectively enrolled and assigned to receive two antecubital peripheral blood punctures from both arms, using the two devices. The blood drawn sequence (i.e. right or left arm first) and the first device to be used (i.e. direct vacuntainer® or Butterfly Needle first) were randomly established.Results. Forty healthy volunteers (mean age 42.9 years; SD 7.5; range 27-58), comprising 25 (62.5%) women, were recruited. APTT obtained with the two blood drawn devices significantly and positive correlated (Spearman rho=0.943; p

  • differences in activated partial thromboplastin time aptt measures depending on the device used in blood samples drawn direct vacutainerâ versus Butterfly Needle a randomized comparative study
    International Journal of Nursing, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ana Belen Friginal, Ángel Arias, Bola Var L Da Azjordain, Ana Rosa La Pezquia Ones, Josa M Romeropino, Alfredo J. Lucendo

    Abstract:

     Background. Most laboratory errors occur during the pre-analytical phase and are often related to the blood drawn equipment. No studies have evaluated yet the influence of the most common vein puncture devices on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). We aimed to compare APTT when venous blood samples are drawn with two different Needle devices (direct Vacutainer® versus Butterfly Needle). Methods. Consecutive adult healthy volunteers were prospectively enrolled and assigned to receive two antecubital peripheral blood punctures from both arms, using the two devices. The blood drawn sequence (i.e. right or left arm first) and the first device to be used (i.e. direct vacuntainer® or Butterfly Needle first) were randomly established.Results. Forty healthy volunteers (mean age 42.9 years; SD 7.5; range 27-58), comprising 25 (62.5%) women, were recruited. APTT obtained with the two blood drawn devices significantly and positive correlated (Spearman rho=0.943; p<0.001). However, mean APTT was significantly more prolonged in blood samples drawn with Butterfly Needles than in those obtained with direct vacutainer® (34.01 ± 4.4 vs. 33.63 ± 3.8 seconds, respectively; p=0.013). No differences in APTT were found when samples obtained from right and left arms were compared.Discussion. The type of blood drawn equipment significantly influences APTT, which is prolonged when a Butterfly Needle is used. An increased contact time between blood and Butterfly tube plastic material would favor a premature consumption of plasma coagulation factors before mixing with anticoagulants in the collection tube. The appropriately chosen blood drawn device is thus essential to avoid pre-analytical errors.KEY WORDS: Activated partial thromboplastin time, Phlebotomy; Quality control; Blood Specimen Collection; Pre-analytical quality; Laboratory techniques and procedures

Mitsuhiro Kamiyoshihara – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Anatomical segmentectomy of the lung: tip of identifying the intersegmental plane
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2013
    Co-Authors: Mitsuhiro Kamiyoshihara, Kimihiro Shimizu, Hitoshi Igai, Natsuko Kawatani, I Shiraishi, Kai Obayashi, Seshiru Nakazawa, Yoichi Ohtaki, Isumi Takeyoshi

    Abstract:

    A pulmonary segmentectomy requires identification of the segmental planes, making it technically more difficult than a lobectomy. Therefore, we present a selective segmental-inflation technique using a Butterfly Needle. This paper discusses anatomical segmenectomy with special reference to identifying the intersegmental plane. Methods First, the lung is deflated and the pulmonary vessels to the involved segment are divided. The segmental bronchus is divided using a stapling device or ligation. Then, using a Butterfly Needle, oxygen (approximately 1 L/min.) is instilled into the targeted bronchus to inflate the involved segment, and the involved segment is severed and removed using electrocautery or a stapling device. The raw surface is covered with an absorbable sealing material to prevent air leaks. Results Fifty-three (M:F = 33:33) patients underwent anatomical segmentectomy with the selective segmental-inflation technique using a Butterfly Needle. Their median age was 64.9 years. The diseases were malignant lung disease in 52 patients and benign lung disease in 14. The surgical procedure was segmentectomy only in 60 and segmentectomy combined with lobectomy in six. The median operating time was 170 min; the blood loss was 82 g; and the postoperative stay was 8 days. The duration of chest tube drainage was 3 days. No major complication occurred. Conclusions In summary, anatomical segmentectomy was performed successfully with the selective segmental-inflation technique using a Butterfly Needle. Advantages: Surgeons can control every manipulation. No special device is needed; a Butterfly Needle is sufficient. It is useful regardless of the situation of proximal bronchus. Ultraselective air instillation into the subsegmental bronchus depends on the Needle direction. Disadvantages: The proximal site of the targeted bronchus must be identified. Care is needed to avoid systemic air embolism.

  • a simple new technique for identifying the cut line in the bronchus in bronchoplasty using a Butterfly Needle
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mitsuhiro Kamiyoshihara, Toshiteru Nagashima, Kimihiro Shimizu

    Abstract:

    The standard method of bronchoscopic guidance used to identify a bronchial or tracheal tumour during surgery has some disadvantages: (1) it is impossible to identify the incision site in a distal bronchus; (2) bronchoscopy must be performed by a skilled physician; and (3) time and effort are wasted during the operation. We report a new and simple technique to locate endobronchial tumours. Our technique uses a Butterfly Needle connected to a syringe kept half-full of normal saline solution via an extension tube. The bronchus is punctured using the Needle, keeping the syringe under negative pressure. We found that a tumour could be detected through simple observation of the saline solution within the syringe upon bronchial puncture, whereby the tumour is positively detected through the absence of bubble production and ruled out through the production of bubbles. This technique will locate a bronchial or tracheal tumour without bronchoscopy. In addition, it saves time, which benefits the patient. # 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • Butterfly Needle video assisted thoracoscopic segmentectomy a retrospective review and technique in detail
    Innovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, 2009
    Co-Authors: Mitsuhiro Kamiyoshihara, Seiichi Kakegawa, Izumi Takeyoshi

    Abstract:

    ObjectiveA pulmonary segmentectomy is requires the identification of the segmental planes, making it technically more difficult than a lobectomy. Therefore, we present a new method that uses a butt…