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Victor Max Corman – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • no serologic evidence of middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection among Camel farmers exposed to highly seropositive Camel herds a household linked study kenya 2013
    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017
    Co-Authors: Peninah Munyua, Victor Max Corman, Marcel A. Müller, Benjamin Meyer, Austine Bitek, Eric Osoro, Erik Lattwein, S M Thumbi, Rees Murithi, Marcalain Widdowson

    Abstract:

    High seroprevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) among Camels has been reported in Kenya and other countries in Africa. To date, the only report of MERS-CoV seropositivity among humans in Kenya is of two livestock keepers with no known contact with Camels. We assessed whether persons exposed to seropositive Camels at household level had serological evidence of infection. In 2013, 760 human and 879 Camel sera were collected from 275 and 85 households respectively in Marsabit County. Data on human and animal demographics and type of contact with Camels were collected. Human and Camel sera were tested for anti-MERS-CoV IgG using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Human samples were confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with seropositivity. The median age of persons sampled was 30 years (range: 5–90) and 50% were males. A quarter (197/760) of the participants reported having had contact with Camels defined as milking, feeding, watering, slaughtering, or herding. Of the human sera, 18 (2.4%) were positive on ELISA but negative by PRNT. Of the Camel sera, 791 (90%) were positive on ELISA. On univariate analysis, higher prevalence was observed in female and older Camels over 4 years of age (P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, only age remained significantly associated with increased odds of seropositivity. Despite high seroprevalence among Camels, there was no serological confirmation of MERS-CoV infection among Camel pastoralists in Marsabit County. The high seropositivity suggests that MERS-CoV or other closely related virus continues to circulate in Camels and highlights ongoing potential for animal-to-human transmission.

  • mers coronavirus neutralizing antibodies in Camels eastern africa 1983 1997
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Marcel A. Müller, Victor Max Corman, Benjamin Meyer, Erik Lattwein, Joerg Jores, Mario Younan, Anne Liljander, Berend Jan Bosch, M Hilali, Bakri E Musa

    Abstract:

    To analyze the distribution of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)–seropositive dromedary Camels in eastern Africa, we tested 189 archived serum samples accumulated during the past 30 years. We identified MERS-CoV neutralizing antibodies in 81.0% of samples from the main Camel-exporting countries, Sudan and Somalia, suggesting long-term virus circulation in these animals.

  • antibodies against mers coronavirus in dromedary Camels kenya 1992 2013
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Victor Max Corman, Benjamin Meyer, Erik Lattwein, Joerg Jores, Mario Younan, Anne Liljander, Mohammed Y Said, Ilona Gluecks, Berend Jan Bosch, Jan Felix Drexler

    Abstract:

    Dromedary Camels are a putative source for human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We showed that Camels sampled in different regions in Kenya during 1992–2013 have antibodies against this virus. High densities of Camel populations correlated with increased seropositivity and might be a factor in predicting long-term virus maintenance.

Benjamin Meyer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • no serologic evidence of middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection among Camel farmers exposed to highly seropositive Camel herds a household linked study kenya 2013
    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017
    Co-Authors: Peninah Munyua, Victor Max Corman, Marcel A. Müller, Benjamin Meyer, Austine Bitek, Eric Osoro, Erik Lattwein, S M Thumbi, Rees Murithi, Marcalain Widdowson

    Abstract:

    High seroprevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) among Camels has been reported in Kenya and other countries in Africa. To date, the only report of MERS-CoV seropositivity among humans in Kenya is of two livestock keepers with no known contact with Camels. We assessed whether persons exposed to seropositive Camels at household level had serological evidence of infection. In 2013, 760 human and 879 Camel sera were collected from 275 and 85 households respectively in Marsabit County. Data on human and animal demographics and type of contact with Camels were collected. Human and Camel sera were tested for anti-MERS-CoV IgG using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Human samples were confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with seropositivity. The median age of persons sampled was 30 years (range: 5–90) and 50% were males. A quarter (197/760) of the participants reported having had contact with Camels defined as milking, feeding, watering, slaughtering, or herding. Of the human sera, 18 (2.4%) were positive on ELISA but negative by PRNT. Of the Camel sera, 791 (90%) were positive on ELISA. On univariate analysis, higher prevalence was observed in female and older Camels over 4 years of age (P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, only age remained significantly associated with increased odds of seropositivity. Despite high seroprevalence among Camels, there was no serological confirmation of MERS-CoV infection among Camel pastoralists in Marsabit County. The high seropositivity suggests that MERS-CoV or other closely related virus continues to circulate in Camels and highlights ongoing potential for animal-to-human transmission.

  • mers coronavirus neutralizing antibodies in Camels eastern africa 1983 1997
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Marcel A. Müller, Victor Max Corman, Benjamin Meyer, Erik Lattwein, Joerg Jores, Mario Younan, Anne Liljander, Berend Jan Bosch, M Hilali, Bakri E Musa

    Abstract:

    To analyze the distribution of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)–seropositive dromedary Camels in eastern Africa, we tested 189 archived serum samples accumulated during the past 30 years. We identified MERS-CoV neutralizing antibodies in 81.0% of samples from the main Camel-exporting countries, Sudan and Somalia, suggesting long-term virus circulation in these animals.

  • antibodies against mers coronavirus in dromedary Camels kenya 1992 2013
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Victor Max Corman, Benjamin Meyer, Erik Lattwein, Joerg Jores, Mario Younan, Anne Liljander, Mohammed Y Said, Ilona Gluecks, Berend Jan Bosch, Jan Felix Drexler

    Abstract:

    Dromedary Camels are a putative source for human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We showed that Camels sampled in different regions in Kenya during 1992–2013 have antibodies against this virus. High densities of Camel populations correlated with increased seropositivity and might be a factor in predicting long-term virus maintenance.

Ziad A Memish – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus mers cov origin and animal reservoir
    Virology Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Hamzah A Mohd, Jaffar A Altawfiq, Ziad A Memish

    Abstract:

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel coronavirus discovered in 2012 and is responsible for acute respiratory syndrome in humans. Though not confirmed yet, multiple surveillance and phylogenetic studies suggest a bat origin. The disease is heavily endemic in dromedary Camel populations of East Africa and the Middle East. It is unclear as to when the virus was introduced to dromedary Camels, but data from studies that investigated stored dromedary Camel sera and geographical distribution of involved dromedary Camel populations suggested that the virus was present in dromedary Camels several decades ago. Though bats and alpacas can serve as potential reservoirs for MERS-CoV, dromedary Camels seem to be the only animal host responsible for the spill over human infections.

  • human infection with mers coronavirus after exposure to infected Camels saudi arabia 2013
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ziad A Memish, Victor Max Corman, Benjamin Meyer, Matthew Cotten, Simon J Watson, Abdullah J Alsahafi, Abdullah Al A Rabeeah, Andrea Sieberg, Hatem Q Makhdoom, Abdullah M Assiri

    Abstract:

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected Camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the Camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.