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Robert J Miller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Preliminary assessment of Acaricide Resistance in cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus populations from the Caribbean island of Martinique. [p081]
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Stéphanie Depraz, Robert J Miller, Leonore Lovis, Manon Hamon, Philippe Pelonde, Lionel Felixine, Marie-claire Timir, Christophe Dalibard, Adalberto A. Pérez De León, Linroy Christian
    Abstract:

    Context: Ticks and Tick-borne diseases (T&TBD) remain major constraints to livestock development in the Caribbean. The continuous use of Acaricides to control ticks is costly for livestock producers. Chemicals were used extensively in the Caribbean during Tropical Bont Tick programs between 1995 and 2005. The Cattle Fever Tick (CFT), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is known to develop multiResistance to Acaricides. However little is known about Acaricide Resistance epidemiology in the Caribbean, where CFT is endemic. Recently, several countries reported to the T&TBD working group of the Caribbean Animal Health Network (CaribVET) increasing cases of lack of acaracide efficacy on ruminants, especially in Martinique. Purpose: A 2-year project “ResisT” involving researchers, tick experts, veterinary services and farmer associations has been established to address Resistance in CFT Caribbean populations. Results of a pilot study conducted in Martinique are reported here. Methods: The Larval Tarsal Test, an innovative test developed by Novartis, was implemented at CIRAD laboratory in Guadeloupe. An exploratory survey was conducted in early 2015 to collect engorged female ticks from cattle, and to study tick control practices of 50 volunteer farmers. Five Acaricides from 3 major classes commonly used in the French West Indies were tested: synthetic pyrethroids, amidines and organophosphates. A susceptible strain maintained at the USDA-ARS CFTRL in Texas was used as reference to calculate Resistance ratios. Results: Preliminary results will be reported during this presentation. Conclusions: Study results and other epidemiological data on Acaricide Resistance and information on control practices will be integrated to develop tools and awareness materials for Caribbean farmers. Relevance: Studies like the one reported are needed to formulate strategies to prevent Acaricide Resistance development by adopting integrated tick control strategies. Knowledge gaps identified during the study enabled CaribVET to prioritize relevant avenues of research and to build collaborations in support of the veterinary services in the region to improve T&TBD surveillance and control. (Texte integral)

  • Acaricide Resistance of rhipicephalus boophilus microplus in state of mato grosso do sul brazil
    Revista Brasileira De Parasitologia Veterinaria, 2011
    Co-Authors: Renato Andreotti, Robert J Miller, Felix D Guerrero, Mariana Aparecida Soares, Jacqueline Cavalacante Barros, Adalberto Perez A De Leon
    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to obtain an epidemiological view of Acaricide Resistance in populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul. Twenty-four tick samples were collected from municipalities in the State where farmers had reported concerns about Resistance to or failure of tick control. These ticks were subjected to in vitro Resistance detection assays using the adult immersion test (AIT). The efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin, cypermethrin and amitraz treatments on samples collected throughout the State was generally poor. AIT showed efficacy ≥ 90% from the use of DDVP + chlorfenvinphos) (20 out of 21 municipalities), dichlorvos + cypermethrin (10 out of 16 municipalities) and cypermethrin + citronella + chlorpyrifos + piperonyl butoxide (20 out of 21 municipalities). PCR assays were used to detect the presence of pyrethroid Resistance-associated sodium channel gene mutation. Larvae from three different populations that had previously been diagnosed as pyrethroid-resistant, through AIT, were evaluated. The PCR assays showed that the pyrethroid Resistance-associated gene mutation was absent from these three populations. This study confirms that the emergence of Resistance is a constant challenge for the livestock industry, and that development of Resistance continues to be a major driver for new antiparasitic drugs to be developed.

  • Acaricide Resistance of rhipicephalus boophilus microplus in state of mato grosso do sul brazil resistencia do rhipicephalus boophilus microplus aos acaricidas no estado de mato grosso do sul brasil
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Renato Andreotti, Robert J Miller, Felix D Guerrero, Adalberto Perez A De Leon, Mariana Aparecida Soares, Jacqueline Cavalcante Barros, Usdaars Kniplingbushland
    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to obtain an epidemiological view of Acaricide Resistance in populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul. Twenty-four tick samples were collected from municipalities in the State where farmers had reported concerns about Resistance to or failure of tick control. These ticks were subjected to in vitro Resistance detection assays using the adult immersion test (AIT). The efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin, cypermethrin and amitraz treatments on samples collected throughout the State was generally poor. AIT showed efficacy ≥ 90% from the use of DDVP + chlorfenvinphos) (20 out of 21 municipalities), dichlorvos + cypermethrin (10 out of 16 municipalities) and cypermethrin + citronella + chlorpyrifos + piperonyl butoxide (20 out of 21 municipalities). PCR assays were used to detect the presence of pyrethroid Resistance-associated sodium channel gene mutation. Larvae from three different populations that had previously been diagnosed as pyrethroid-resistant, through AIT, were evaluated. The PCR assays showed that the pyrethroid Resistance-associated gene mutation was absent from these three populations. This study confirms that the emergence of Resistance is a constant challenge for the livestock industry, and that development of Resistance continues to be a major driver for new antiparasitic drugs to be developed.

Fang Zhu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanisms and management of Acaricide Resistance for Tetranychus urticae in agroecosystems
    Journal of Pest Science, 2021
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Fang Zhu, Timothy W. Moural, Laura C. Lavine, Douglas B Walsh
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is a constant threat to sustainable production of numerous economically important crops globally. Management of T. urticae is heavily reliant on the application of synthetic Acaricides. However, T. urticae has rapidly developed Resistance to most of the Acaricides available for its control due to its very broad host plant range, extremely short lifecycle, high fecundity, arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, and overwintering strategy. Despite the recent progress in identifying genetic changes/markers associated with Resistance toward some commonly used Acaricides for T. urticae , there is still limited studies that select and apply these markers in field populations to guide sustainable pest management strategy design. Temporal and spatial characterization of Acaricide-resistant phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are crucial for the design and implementation of successful and sustainable integrated mite management programs. This review highlights the current Acaricide Resistance status of field-collected T. urticae populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms of Resistance. Our review found that some genetic mutations in target sites and/or overexpression of metabolic genes confer Resistance in geographically exclusive populations, while some Resistance markers appear to be specific to populations at biogeographical areas. Thus, there is a need for locally based coordinated efforts to understand the mechanisms of Resistance present in endemic T. urticae populations. Moreover, we discuss a prospective template for designing an effective Acaricide Resistance management program within various agroecosystems.

  • rna interference of nadph cytochrome p450 reductase increases susceptibilities to multiple Acaricides in tetranychus urticae
    Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Antonio Cardenas, Douglas B Walsh, Fang Zhu
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a polyphagous pest feeding on over 1100 plant species, including numerous highly valued economic crops. The control of T. urticae largely depends on the use of Acaricides, which leads to pervasive development of Acaricide Resistance. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic detoxification is one of the major mechanisms of Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays as a crucial co-factor protein that donates electron(s) to microsomal cytochrome P450s to complete their catalytic cycle. This study seeks to understand the involvement of CPR/P450 in Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. The full-length cDNA sequence of T. urticae’s CPR (TuCPR) was cloned and characterized. TuCPR was ubiquitously transcribed in different life stages of T. urticae and the highest transcription was observed in the nymph and adult stages. TuCPR was constitutively over-expressed in six Acaricide resistant populations compared to a susceptible one. TuCPR transcriptional expression was also induced by multiple Acaricides in a time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of TuCPR via RNA interference (RNAi) in T. urticae led to reduced enzymatic activities of TuCPR and cytochrome P450s, as well as a reduction of Resistance to multiple Acaricides, abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate. The outcome of this study highlights CPR as a potential novel target for eco-friendly control of T. urticae and other related plant-feeding pests.

  • Physiological Resistance alters behavioral response of Tetranychus urticae to Acaricides.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Michael J. Beauchamp, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Fang Zhu, Doug B. Walsh
    Abstract:

    Multiple Acaricide Resistance in Tetranychus urticae continues to threaten crop production globally, justifying the need to adequately study Resistance for sustainable pest management. Most studies on Acaricide Resistance have focused on the acute contact toxicity of Acaricides with little or no information on the behavioral responses elicited after Acaricide exposure. Furthermore, the impact of physiological Resistance on these behavioral responses remains unknown in most pest species, including T. urticae. We tested the effect of Acaricide Resistance on contact toxicity, irritancy and repellency of mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor of complex I (MET-I) and mite growth inhiinhibitor (MGI) Acaricides on multiple T. urticae strains. We also tested whether Acaricides with similar physiological target site/mode of action also elicit similar behavioral effects on T. urticae strains. MET-I Acaricides (fenazaquin, fenpyroximate, and pyrabiden) and MGIs (clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole) elicited a dose-dependent irritant and repellent effect on T. urticae. Selection of strains for physiological Resistance to these Acaricides affected the behavioral response of T. urticae, especially in MET-I resistant strains, that showed reduced irritancy and repellency to MET-I Acaricides. Behavioral response also affected the oviposition of T. urticae, where strains generally showed preferential oviposition away from the Acaricides. The outcome of this study highlights negative consequences of Acaricide Resistance that can potentially affect T. urticae management.

Adekunle W. Adesanya – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanisms and management of Acaricide Resistance for Tetranychus urticae in agroecosystems
    Journal of Pest Science, 2021
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Fang Zhu, Timothy W. Moural, Laura C. Lavine, Douglas B Walsh
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is a constant threat to sustainable production of numerous economically important crops globally. Management of T. urticae is heavily reliant on the application of synthetic Acaricides. However, T. urticae has rapidly developed Resistance to most of the Acaricides available for its control due to its very broad host plant range, extremely short lifecycle, high fecundity, arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, and overwintering strategy. Despite the recent progress in identifying genetic changes/markers associated with Resistance toward some commonly used Acaricides for T. urticae , there is still limited studies that select and apply these markers in field populations to guide sustainable pest management strategy design. Temporal and spatial characterization of Acaricide-resistant phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are crucial for the design and implementation of successful and sustainable integrated mite management programs. This review highlights the current Acaricide Resistance status of field-collected T. urticae populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms of Resistance. Our review found that some genetic mutations in target sites and/or overexpression of metabolic genes confer Resistance in geographically exclusive populations, while some Resistance markers appear to be specific to populations at biogeographical areas. Thus, there is a need for locally based coordinated efforts to understand the mechanisms of Resistance present in endemic T. urticae populations. Moreover, we discuss a prospective template for designing an effective Acaricide Resistance management program within various agroecosystems.

  • rna interference of nadph cytochrome p450 reductase increases susceptibilities to multiple Acaricides in tetranychus urticae
    Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Antonio Cardenas, Douglas B Walsh, Fang Zhu
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a polyphagous pest feeding on over 1100 plant species, including numerous highly valued economic crops. The control of T. urticae largely depends on the use of Acaricides, which leads to pervasive development of Acaricide Resistance. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic detoxification is one of the major mechanisms of Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays as a crucial co-factor protein that donates electron(s) to microsomal cytochrome P450s to complete their catalytic cycle. This study seeks to understand the involvement of CPR/P450 in Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. The full-length cDNA sequence of T. urticae’s CPR (TuCPR) was cloned and characterized. TuCPR was ubiquitously transcribed in different life stages of T. urticae and the highest transcription was observed in the nymph and adult stages. TuCPR was constitutively over-expressed in six Acaricide resistant populations compared to a susceptible one. TuCPR transcriptional expression was also induced by multiple Acaricides in a time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of TuCPR via RNA interference (RNAi) in T. urticae led to reduced enzymatic activities of TuCPR and cytochrome P450s, as well as a reduction of Resistance to multiple Acaricides, abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate. The outcome of this study highlights CPR as a potential novel target for eco-friendly control of T. urticae and other related plant-feeding pests.

  • Physiological Resistance alters behavioral response of Tetranychus urticae to Acaricides.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Michael J. Beauchamp, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Fang Zhu, Doug B. Walsh
    Abstract:

    Multiple Acaricide Resistance in Tetranychus urticae continues to threaten crop production globally, justifying the need to adequately study Resistance for sustainable pest management. Most studies on Acaricide Resistance have focused on the acute contact toxicity of Acaricides with little or no information on the behavioral responses elicited after Acaricide exposure. Furthermore, the impact of physiological Resistance on these behavioral responses remains unknown in most pest species, including T. urticae. We tested the effect of Acaricide Resistance on contact toxicity, irritancy and repellency of mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor of complex I (MET-I) and mite growth inhibitor (MGI) Acaricides on multiple T. urticae strains. We also tested whether Acaricides with similar physiological target site/mode of action also elicit similar behavioral effects on T. urticae strains. MET-I Acaricides (fenazaquin, fenpyroximate, and pyrabiden) and MGIs (clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole) elicited a dose-dependent irritant and repellent effect on T. urticae. Selection of strains for physiological Resistance to these Acaricides affected the behavioral response of T. urticae, especially in MET-I resistant strains, that showed reduced irritancy and repellency to MET-I Acaricides. Behavioral response also affected the oviposition of T. urticae, where strains generally showed preferential oviposition away from the Acaricides. The outcome of this study highlights negative consequences of Acaricide Resistance that can potentially affect T. urticae management.

Mark D. Lavine – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanisms and management of Acaricide Resistance for Tetranychus urticae in agroecosystems
    Journal of Pest Science, 2021
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Fang Zhu, Timothy W. Moural, Laura C. Lavine, Douglas B Walsh
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is a constant threat to sustainable production of numerous economically important crops globally. Management of T. urticae is heavily reliant on the application of synthetic Acaricides. However, T. urticae has rapidly developed Resistance to most of the Acaricides available for its control due to its very broad host plant range, extremely short lifecycle, high fecundity, arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, and overwintering strategy. Despite the recent progress in identifying genetic changes/markers associated with Resistance toward some commonly used Acaricides for T. urticae , there is still limited studies that select and apply these markers in field populations to guide sustainable pest management strategy design. Temporal and spatial characterization of Acaricide-resistant phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are crucial for the design and implementation of successful and sustainable integrated mite management programs. This review highlights the current Acaricide Resistance status of field-collected T. urticae populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms of Resistance. Our review found that some genetic mutations in target sites and/or overexpression of metabolic genes confer Resistance in geographically exclusive populations, while some Resistance markers appear to be specific to populations at biogeographical areas. Thus, there is a need for locally based coordinated efforts to understand the mechanisms of Resistance present in endemic T. urticae populations. Moreover, we discuss a prospective template for designing an effective Acaricide Resistance management program within various agroecosystems.

  • rna interference of nadph cytochrome p450 reductase increases susceptibilities to multiple Acaricides in tetranychus urticae
    Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Antonio Cardenas, Douglas B Walsh, Fang Zhu
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a polyphagous pest feeding on over 1100 plant species, including numerous highly valued economic crops. The control of T. urticae largely depends on the use of Acaricides, which leads to pervasive development of Acaricide Resistance. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic detoxification is one of the major mechanisms of Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays as a crucial co-factor protein that donates electron(s) to microsomal cytochrome P450s to complete their catalytic cycle. This study seeks to understand the involvement of CPR/P450 in Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. The full-length cDNA sequence of T. urticae’s CPR (TuCPR) was cloned and characterized. TuCPR was ubiquitously transcribed in different life stages of T. urticae and the highest transcription was observed in the nymph and adult stages. TuCPR was constitutively over-expressed in six Acaricide resistant populations compared to a susceptible one. TuCPR transcriptional expression was also induced by multiple Acaricides in a time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of TuCPR via RNA interference (RNAi) in T. urticae led to reduced enzymatic activities of TuCPR and cytochrome P450s, as well as a reduction of Resistance to multiple Acaricides, abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate. The outcome of this study highlights CPR as a potential novel target for eco-friendly control of T. urticae and other related plant-feeding pests.

  • Physiological Resistance alters behavioral response of Tetranychus urticae to Acaricides.
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Michael J. Beauchamp, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Fang Zhu, Doug B. Walsh
    Abstract:

    Multiple Acaricide Resistance in Tetranychus urticae continues to threaten crop production globally, justifying the need to adequately study Resistance for sustainable pest management. Most studies on Acaricide Resistance have focused on the acute contact toxicity of Acaricides with little or no information on the behavioral responses elicited after Acaricide exposure. Furthermore, the impact of physiological Resistance on these behavioral responses remains unknown in most pest species, including T. urticae. We tested the effect of Acaricide Resistance on contact toxicity, irritancy and repellency of mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor of complex I (MET-I) and mite growth inhibitor (MGI) Acaricides on multiple T. urticae strains. We also tested whether Acaricides with similar physiological target site/mode of action also elicit similar behavioral effects on T. urticae strains. MET-I Acaricides (fenazaquin, fenpyroximate, and pyrabiden) and MGIs (clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole) elicited a dose-dependent irritant and repellent effect on T. urticae. Selection of strains for physiological Resistance to these Acaricides affected the behavioral response of T. urticae, especially in MET-I resistant strains, that showed reduced irritancy and repellency to MET-I Acaricides. Behavioral response also affected the oviposition of T. urticae, where strains generally showed preferential oviposition away from the Acaricides. The outcome of this study highlights negative consequences of Acaricide Resistance that can potentially affect T. urticae management.

Douglas B Walsh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanisms and management of Acaricide Resistance for Tetranychus urticae in agroecosystems
    Journal of Pest Science, 2021
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Fang Zhu, Timothy W. Moural, Laura C. Lavine, Douglas B Walsh
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is a constant threat to sustainable production of numerous economically important crops globally. Management of T. urticae is heavily reliant on the application of synthetic Acaricides. However, T. urticae has rapidly developed Resistance to most of the Acaricides available for its control due to its very broad host plant range, extremely short lifecycle, high fecundity, arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, and overwintering strategy. Despite the recent progress in identifying genetic changes/markers associated with Resistance toward some commonly used Acaricides for T. urticae , there is still limited studies that select and apply these markers in field populations to guide sustainable pest management strategy design. Temporal and spatial characterization of Acaricide-resistant phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are crucial for the design and implementation of successful and sustainable integrated mite management programs. This review highlights the current Acaricide Resistance status of field-collected T. urticae populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms of Resistance. Our review found that some genetic mutations in target sites and/or overexpression of metabolic genes confer Resistance in geographically exclusive populations, while some Resistance markers appear to be specific to populations at biogeographical areas. Thus, there is a need for locally based coordinated efforts to understand the mechanisms of Resistance present in endemic T. urticae populations. Moreover, we discuss a prospective template for designing an effective Acaricide Resistance management program within various agroecosystems.

  • rna interference of nadph cytochrome p450 reductase increases susceptibilities to multiple Acaricides in tetranychus urticae
    Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Antonio Cardenas, Douglas B Walsh, Fang Zhu
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a polyphagous pest feeding on over 1100 plant species, including numerous highly valued economic crops. The control of T. urticae largely depends on the use of Acaricides, which leads to pervasive development of Acaricide Resistance. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic detoxification is one of the major mechanisms of Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays as a crucial co-factor protein that donates electron(s) to microsomal cytochrome P450s to complete their catalytic cycle. This study seeks to understand the involvement of CPR/P450 in Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. The full-length cDNA sequence of T. urticae’s CPR (TuCPR) was cloned and characterized. TuCPR was ubiquitously transcribed in different life stages of T. urticae and the highest transcription was observed in the nymph and adult stages. TuCPR was constitutively over-expressed in six Acaricide resistant populations compared to a susceptible one. TuCPR transcriptional expression was also induced by multiple Acaricides in a time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of TuCPR via RNA interference (RNAi) in T. urticae led to reduced enzymatic activities of TuCPR and cytochrome P450s, as well as a reduction of Resistance to multiple Acaricides, abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate. The outcome of this study highlights CPR as a potential novel target for eco-friendly control of T. urticae and other related plant-feeding pests.

  • rna interference of nadph cytochrome p450 reductase increases susceptibilities to multiple Acaricides in tetranychus urticae
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Adekunle W. Adesanya, Mark D. Lavine, Laura Corley Lavine, Antonio Cardenas, Douglas B Walsh, Fang Zhu
    Abstract:

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a polyphagous pest feeding on over 1,100 plant species, including numerous highly valued economic crops. The control of T. urticae largely depends on the use of Acaricides, which leads to pervasive development of Acaricide Resistance. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic detoxification is one of the major mechanisms of Acaricide Resistance in T. urticae. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays as a crucial co-factor protein that donates electron(s) to microsomal cytochrome P450s to complete their catalytic cycle. This study seeks to understand the involvement of CPR in Acaricide Resistance in urticae. The full-length cDNA sequence of T. urticaes CPR (TuCPR) was cloned and characterized. TuCPR was ubiquitously transcribed in different life stages of T. urticae and the highest transcription was observed in the nymph and adult stages. TuCPR was constitutively over-expressed in six Acaricide resistant populations compared to a susceptible one. TuCPR transcriptional expression was also induced by multiple Acaricides in a time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of TuCPR via RNA interference (RNAi) in T. urticae led to reduced enzymatic activities of TuCPR and cytochrome P450s, as well as a significant reduction of Resistance to multiple Acaricides, abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate. The outcome of this study highlights CPR as a potential novel target for eco-friendly control of T. urticae and other related plant-feeding pests.nnHighlightsO_LIPipernoyl butoxide significantly reduced abamectin, bifenthrin, and fenpyroximate Resistance in T. urticae populationsnC_LIO_LIT. urticaes cytochrome P450 reductase (TuCPR) was cloned, sequenced and phylogenetically analyzednC_LIO_LIAbamectin, bifenthrin and fenpyroximate treatment induced TuCPR gene expressionnC_LIO_LISilencing of TuCPR in T. urticae caused a reduction in Acaricide ResistancenC_LI