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Acemannan

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Pasutha Thunyakitpisal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acemannan Used as an Implantable Biomaterial for Vital Pulp Therapy of Immature Permanent Teeth Induced Continued Root Formation.
    Pharmaceutics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minh Nguyen, Polkit Sangvanich, Quang N. Nguyen, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Direct pulp-capping, a vital pulp therapy, is used to protect and preserve pulp vitality by applying a biomaterial on the pulp exposure site. Acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, induces osteodentin-bridge formation to cover the exposure site in vivo. We evaluated the effect of Acemannan sponges on partial pulpotomized permanent teeth with caries or accident-induced pulp exposure (n = 50). After removing infected dentin and inflamed pulp tissue, the teeth were randomly divided into Acemannan or control (mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) groups (n = 25). The teeth were examined immediately after treatment (baseline) and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups for clinical and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination. The three-dimensional tooth length and root apex area were simulated to determine treatment success. We found that the overall success rate in the Acemannan and MTA groups from baseline to 12-month follow-up was 90.91% and 95.65%, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). In the success teeth in both groups, the root length increased, and the apex area significantly decreased (p < 0.05), indicating continued root formation. Our results suggest that Acemannan is a promising low-cost biomaterial for partial pulpotomy treatment for immature permanent teeth requiring vital pulp therapy.

  • Acemannan induces rapid early osseous defect healing after apical surgery: A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.
    Journal of Dental Sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Cuong Le Van, Polkit Sangvanich, Hien Pham Thi Thu, Vannaporn Chuenchompoonut, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background/purpose Acemannan is an osteoinductive material. This study’s objective was to compare the outcomes of bone defect healing using 3-dimensional images after apical surgery with or without adding Acemannan sponges. Materials and methods Twenty-two anterior teeth from 9 males and 13 females requiring apical surgery were included in this randomized controlled trial. Post-surgery, the bone defects were randomly divided into three groups: blood clot control, 5-, or 10-mg Acemannan sponge groups. CBCT scans were taken immediately (baseline), 3-, 6-, and 12-month post-surgery. Sagittal serial sections (1 mm thick slices parallel to the long axis of the tooth) of the defect image were created. The defect boundary was located and the total bone defect volume (BDV) was calculated from the sum of the volume of the serial defect sections. The bone healing was assessed by the percentage of total bone defect volume reduction (%ΔBDV). The paired t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the differences within each group and between groups, respectively. Results The baseline mean BDV of the control, 5-, and 10-mg Acemannan groups were not significantly different (p > 0.05). After treatment, the mean BDV for each group was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, the 5- and 10-mg Acemannan groups had a significantly greater %ΔBDV (approximately 2- and 1.89-fold) at 3-months post-surgery, respectively (p  Conclusion These data suggest Acemannan enhanced early bone healing after apical surgery.

  • Acemannan Induced Bone Regeneration in Lateral Sinus Augmentation Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomographic and Histopathological Evaluation.
    Case Reports in Dentistry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hai Anh Trinh, Wijit Banlunara, Polkit Sangvanich, Van Viet Dam, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    : Acemannan, the major polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, is biomaterial that has demonstrated osteoinductive effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of Acemannan sponges on bone formation in open-type sinus augmentation has not evaluated. Here, we report a case study using radiographic and histological analyses to investigate the effect of Acemannan on bone formation after lateral sinus lift surgery. The case was a 57-year-old female patient with an atrophic left posterior maxilla who underwent lateral sinus lift using an Acemannan sponge using the two-stage procedure. In the first stage, an Acemannan sponge was inserted through the bony window and placed between the antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were taken immediately as baseline and 6-month postoperation for evaluation. A bone core specimen was also obtained for histological examination at the time of implant placement. The histological results revealed new bone formation, and the CBCT images demonstrated increased alveolar bone height at 6-month postoperation. Our findings suggest that an Acemannan sponge could be a biomaterial for inducing bone formation in sinus lift surgery.

Polkit Sangvanich – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acemannan Used as an Implantable Biomaterial for Vital Pulp Therapy of Immature Permanent Teeth Induced Continued Root Formation.
    Pharmaceutics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minh Nguyen, Polkit Sangvanich, Quang N. Nguyen, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Direct pulp-capping, a vital pulp therapy, is used to protect and preserve pulp vitality by applying a biomaterial on the pulp exposure site. Acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, induces osteodentin-bridge formation to cover the exposure site in vivo. We evaluated the effect of Acemannan sponges on partial pulpotomized permanent teeth with caries or accident-induced pulp exposure (n = 50). After removing infected dentin and inflamed pulp tissue, the teeth were randomly divided into Acemannan or control (mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) groups (n = 25). The teeth were examined immediately after treatment (baseline) and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups for clinical and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination. The three-dimensional tooth length and root apex area were simulated to determine treatment success. We found that the overall success rate in the Acemannan and MTA groups from baseline to 12-month follow-up was 90.91% and 95.65%, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). In the success teeth in both groups, the root length increased, and the apex area significantly decreased (p < 0.05), indicating continued root formation. Our results suggest that Acemannan is a promising low-cost biomaterial for partial pulpotomy treatment for immature permanent teeth requiring vital pulp therapy.

  • Acemannan induces rapid early osseous defect healing after apical surgery: A 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.
    Journal of Dental Sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Cuong Le Van, Polkit Sangvanich, Hien Pham Thi Thu, Vannaporn Chuenchompoonut, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background/purpose Acemannan is an osteoinductive material. This study’s objective was to compare the outcomes of bone defect healing using 3-dimensional images after apical surgery with or without adding Acemannan sponges. Materials and methods Twenty-two anterior teeth from 9 males and 13 females requiring apical surgery were included in this randomized controlled trial. Post-surgery, the bone defects were randomly divided into three groups: blood clot control, 5-, or 10-mg Acemannan sponge groups. CBCT scans were taken immediately (baseline), 3-, 6-, and 12-month post-surgery. Sagittal serial sections (1 mm thick slices parallel to the long axis of the tooth) of the defect image were created. The defect boundary was located and the total bone defect volume (BDV) was calculated from the sum of the volume of the serial defect sections. The bone healing was assessed by the percentage of total bone defect volume reduction (%ΔBDV). The paired t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the differences within each group and between groups, respectively. Results The baseline mean BDV of the control, 5-, and 10-mg Acemannan groups were not significantly different (p > 0.05). After treatment, the mean BDV for each group was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, the 5- and 10-mg Acemannan groups had a significantly greater %ΔBDV (approximately 2- and 1.89-fold) at 3-months post-surgery, respectively (p  Conclusion These data suggest Acemannan enhanced early bone healing after apical surgery.

  • Acemannan Induced Bone Regeneration in Lateral Sinus Augmentation Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomographic and Histopathological Evaluation.
    Case Reports in Dentistry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hai Anh Trinh, Wijit Banlunara, Polkit Sangvanich, Van Viet Dam, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    : Acemannan, the major polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, is biomaterial that has demonstrated osteoinductive effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of Acemannan sponges on bone formation in open-type sinus augmentation has not evaluated. Here, we report a case study using radiographic and histological analyses to investigate the effect of Acemannan on bone formation after lateral sinus lift surgery. The case was a 57-year-old female patient with an atrophic left posterior maxilla who underwent lateral sinus lift using an Acemannan sponge using the two-stage procedure. In the first stage, an Acemannan sponge was inserted through the bony window and placed between the antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were taken immediately as baseline and 6-month postoperation for evaluation. A bone core specimen was also obtained for histological examination at the time of implant placement. The histological results revealed new bone formation, and the CBCT images demonstrated increased alveolar bone height at 6-month postoperation. Our findings suggest that an Acemannan sponge could be a biomaterial for inducing bone formation in sinus lift surgery.

Wijit Banlunara – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acemannan Induced Bone Regeneration in Lateral Sinus Augmentation Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomographic and Histopathological Evaluation.
    Case Reports in Dentistry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hai Anh Trinh, Wijit Banlunara, Polkit Sangvanich, Van Viet Dam, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    : Acemannan, the major polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, is biomaterial that has demonstrated osteoinductive effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of Acemannan sponges on bone formation in open-type sinus augmentation has not evaluated. Here, we report a case study using radiographic and histological analyses to investigate the effect of Acemannan on bone formation after lateral sinus lift surgery. The case was a 57-year-old female patient with an atrophic left posterior maxilla who underwent lateral sinus lift using an Acemannan sponge using the two-stage procedure. In the first stage, an Acemannan sponge was inserted through the bony window and placed between the antral floor and the elevated sinus membrane. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were taken immediately as baseline and 6-month postoperation for evaluation. A bone core specimen was also obtained for histological examination at the time of implant placement. The histological results revealed new bone formation, and the CBCT images demonstrated increased alveolar bone height at 6-month postoperation. Our findings suggest that an Acemannan sponge could be a biomaterial for inducing bone formation in sinus lift surgery.

  • Acemannan increased bone surface, bone volume, and bone density in a calvarial defect model in skeletally-mature rats.
    Journal of Dental Sciences, 2018
    Co-Authors: Dyna Jeanne D. Godoy, Polkit Sangvanich, Jaroenporn Chokboribal, Wijit Banlunara, Ruben Pauwels, Sukanya Jaroenporn, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background/purpose Acemannan, a β-(1–4)-acetylated polymannose extracted from Aloe vera gel, has been proposed as biomaterial for bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Acemannan in calvarial defect healing. Materials and methods Acemannan was processed to freeze-dried sponge form and disinfected by UV irradiation. Thirty-five female Sprague–Dawley rats were used in the in vivo study. Seven-mm diameter mid-calvarial defects were created and randomly allocated into blood clot control (C), Acemannan 1 mg (A1), 2 mg (A2), 4 mg (A4), and 8 mg (A8) groups (n = 7). After four weeks, the calvarial specimens were subjected to microcomputed tomography (microCT) and histopathological analysis. Results MicroCT revealed a significant increase in bone surface and bone volume in the A1 and A2 groups, and tissue mineral density in the A4 and A8 groups compared with the control group (p  Conclusion Acemannan is an effective bioactive agent for bone regeneration, enhancing bone growth as assayed in two- and three-dimensions.

  • Stimulation of Dentin Regeneration by Using Acemannan in Teeth with Lipopolysaccharide-induced Pulp Inflammation.
    Journal of Endodontics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Siriporn Songsiripradubboon, Wijit Banlunara, Sarunya Kladkaew, Chutima Trairatvorakul, Polakit Sangvanich, Kumpanart Soontornvipart, Pasutha Thunyakitpisal

    Abstract:

    Abstract Introduction This study investigated the effects of Acemannan, a polysaccharide from Aloe vera , on human deciduous pulp cells in vitro and the response after vital pulp therapy in dog deciduous teeth. Methods Human primary dental pulpal cells were treated with Acemannan in vitro and evaluated for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, type I collagen, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2), BMP-4, vascular endothelial growth factor, and dentin sialoprotein expression and mineralization. Osteogenesis-related gene expression was analyzed by complementary DNA microarray. Pulpal inflammation was induced in dog teeth for 14 days. The inflamed pulp was removed, retaining the healthy pulp. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: Acemannan, mineral trioxide aggregate, and formocresol. Sixty days later, the teeth were extracted and evaluated histopathologically. Results Acemannan significantly increased pulp cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, BMP-2, BMP-4, vascular endothelial growth factor, and dentin sialoprotein expression and mineralization approximately 1.4-, 1.6-, 1.6-, 5.5-, 2.6-, 3.8-, 1.8-, and 4.8-fold, respectively, compared with control. In vivo , partial pulpotomy treatment using Acemannan generated outcomes similar to mineral trioxide aggregate treatment, resulting in mineralized bridge formation with normal pulp tissue without inflammation or pulp necrosis. In contrast, the formocresol group demonstrated pulp inflammation without mineralized bridge formation. Conclusions Acemannan is biocompatible with the dental pulp. Furthermore, Acemannan stimulated dentin regeneration in teeth with reversible pulpitis.