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Aeromonas salmonicida

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S G B Amyes – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Amoxycillin resistance in Scottish isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida
    Journal of Fish Diseases, 1994
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    Eighty isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida, recovered from separate outbreaks of furunculosis in famed and wild salmon in Scotland during 1988 and 1989, were examined for susceptibility to the beta-lactam antibiotic amoxycillin. Susceptibility was determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All of the A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates investigated were susceptible to amoxycillin, with MICs of 0.30-1.50 mg l-1. All of the A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes isolates tested were resistant to amoxycillin, with MICs in excess of 500 mg l-1. The A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes produced a beta-lactamase enzyme with a pl of approximately 8.0. The enzyme was inducible and its production was unaffected by plasmid curing with ethidium bromide, suggesting that resistance was chromosomal rather than plasmid mediated.

  • in vitro susceptibility of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida to flumequine
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 1991
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, C S Lewin, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    The activity of the fluoroquinolone flumequine was investigated against the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida and was compared with that of oxolinic acid. Flumequine was more active than oxolinic acid in terms of its MIC against oxolinic acid-resistant isolates of A. salmonicida and was as active as oxolinic acid against susceptible isolates. In contrast to oxolinic acid, flumequine was bactericidal, with only 1% of the bacteria surviving 6 h of exposure to the drug at concentrations slightly above the MIC. Mutation to resistance to flumequine was found to occur at a lower frequency than that to oxolinic acid. Hence, in vitro, flumequine appears to possess some advantages over oxolinic acid against this fish pathogen.

  • InVitro Susceptibility oftheFishPathogen Aeromonas salmonicida toFlumequine
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, C S Lewin, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    Theactivity ofthefluoroquinolone flumequine was investigated against thefish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida andwas compared withthat ofoxolinic acid. Flumequine was more active thanoxolinic acidin termsofitsMICagainst oxolinic acid-resistant isolates ofA.salmonicida andwas asactive asoxolinic acid against susceptible isolates. Incontrast tooxolinic acid, flumequine was bactericidal, withonly 1% ofthe bacteria surviving 6hofexposuretothedrugatconcentrations slightly above theMIC.Mutation toresistance toflumequine wasfound tooccuratalower frequency thanthat tooxolinic acid. Hence, invitro, flumequine appearstopossesssome advantages overoxolinic acidagainst this fish pathogen.

Andrew C. Barnes – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Amoxycillin resistance in Scottish isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida
    Journal of Fish Diseases, 1994
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    Eighty isolates of Aeromonas salmonicida, recovered from separate outbreaks of furunculosis in famed and wild salmon in Scotland during 1988 and 1989, were examined for susceptibility to the beta-lactam antibiotic amoxycillin. Susceptibility was determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All of the A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates investigated were susceptible to amoxycillin, with MICs of 0.30-1.50 mg l-1. All of the A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes isolates tested were resistant to amoxycillin, with MICs in excess of 500 mg l-1. The A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes produced a beta-lactamase enzyme with a pl of approximately 8.0. The enzyme was inducible and its production was unaffected by plasmid curing with ethidium bromide, suggesting that resistance was chromosomal rather than plasmid mediated.

  • in vitro susceptibility of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida to flumequine
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 1991
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, C S Lewin, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    The activity of the fluoroquinolone flumequine was investigated against the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida and was compared with that of oxolinic acid. Flumequine was more active than oxolinic acid in terms of its MIC against oxolinic acid-resistant isolates of A. salmonicida and was as active as oxolinic acid against susceptible isolates. In contrast to oxolinic acid, flumequine was bactericidal, with only 1% of the bacteria surviving 6 h of exposure to the drug at concentrations slightly above the MIC. Mutation to resistance to flumequine was found to occur at a lower frequency than that to oxolinic acid. Hence, in vitro, flumequine appears to possess some advantages over oxolinic acid against this fish pathogen.

  • InVitro Susceptibility oftheFishPathogen Aeromonas salmonicida toFlumequine
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: Andrew C. Barnes, C S Lewin, T S Hastings, S G B Amyes

    Abstract:

    Theactivity ofthefluoroquinolone flumequine was investigated against thefish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida andwas compared withthat ofoxolinic acid. Flumequine was more active thanoxolinic acidin termsofitsMICagainst oxolinic acid-resistant isolates ofA.salmonicida andwas asactive asoxolinic acid against susceptible isolates. Incontrast tooxolinic acid, flumequine was bactericidal, withonly 1% ofthe bacteria surviving 6hofexposuretothedrugatconcentrations slightly above theMIC.Mutation toresistance toflumequine wasfound tooccuratalower frequency thanthat tooxolinic acid. Hence, invitro, flumequine appearstopossesssome advantages overoxolinic acidagainst this fish pathogen.

Brian Austin – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aeromonadaceae Representative (Aeromonas salmonicida)
    Bacterial Fish Pathogens, 2012
    Co-Authors: Brian Austin, Dawn A. Austin

    Abstract:

    Aeromonas salmonicida is a significant pathogen of salmonids, and in its atypical form has spread into cyprinids and marine flatfish. Although Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is homogeneous, atypical isolates are more heterogeneous and do not fit into the current subspecies classification. Questions about the ecology of the organism remain but the consensus is that despite earlier work, cells exist in the aquatic environment although largely in a nonculturable form. Diagnostics have moved towards the use of sensitive and specific molecular methods. Disease control has focused on prophylaxis principally by vaccination, probiotics and immunostimulants.

  • Isolation of Aeromonas salmonicida in association with purple‐pigmented bacteria in sediment from a Scottish loch
    Letters in Applied Microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Dawn A. Austin, P. A. W. Robertson, D. K. Wallace, H. Daskalov, Brian Austin

    Abstract:

    Aeromonas salmonicida was recovered in close association with an unidentified purple-pigmented organism, which was isolated from sediment in a Scottish loch during November (1997) and February (1998). However, there has not been any evidence of A. salmonicida infections, specifically furunculosis, associated with the fish in this loch.

  • characterization of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida different methods
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Brian Austin, Dawn A. Austin, J.l. Larsen, Bjarnheidur K. Gudmundsdóttir, I Dalsgaard, S Hoie, Jacinta M Thornton, B Ohici, Richard Powell

    Abstract:

    Summary Fifty two isolates of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida , recovered from a wide range of hosts and geographical locations, were heterogeneous in terms of molecular and phenotypic characteristics, and represented taxa which could not be accommodated by the current classification of four subspecies. Generally, there was incongruence between the molecular (PCR, RAPD and ribotyping) and phenotypic methods in terms of cluster membership. By PCR, 6 groups were described of which Group 1 encompassed 12 isolates including the type strain of A. salmonicida subsp. smithia . Group 2 accommodated 23 isolates including the reference cultures of subspecies achromogenes and masoucida . The named culture of Haemophilus piscium was recovered in Group 6. By ribotyping and RAPD, the reference cultures were recovered in separate groups. All methods pointed to the uniqueness of subspecies smithia . Most isolates contained 2–6 plasmids, of 2.3 to 150 kb in length. Nevertheless, all isolates possessed certain key characteristics, including Gram-negativity, and the absence of motility.