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Eric Giraud – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • RibBX of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 Plays an Important Role in Intracellular Persistence in Various Aeschynomene Host Plants.
    Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nico Nouwen, Djamel Gully, Jean-françois Arrighi, Eric Giraud
    Abstract:

    Bradyrhizobium ORS285 forms a nitrogen-fixating symbiosis with both Nod factor (NF)-dependent and NF-independent Aeschynomene spp. The Bradyrhizobium ORS285 ribBA gene encodes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with 3,4-dihydroxybutanone phosphate (3,4-DHBP) synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps in the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we show that inactivating the ribBA gene does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy under free-living conditions and that, as shown for RibBAs from other bacteria, the GTP cyclohydrolase II domain has no enzymatic activity. For this reason, we have renamed the annotated ribBA as ribBX. Because we were unable to identify other ribBA or ribA and ribB homologs in the genome of Bradyrhizobium ORS285, we hypothesize that the ORS285 strain can use unconventional enzymes or an alternative pathway for the initial steps of riboflavin biosynthesis. Inactivating ribBX has a drastic impact on the interaction of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 with many of the tested Aeschynomene spp. In these Aeschynomene spp., the ORS285 ribBX mutant is able to infect the plant host cells but the intracellular infection is not maintained and the nodules senesce early. This phenotype can be complemented by reintroduction of the 3,4-DHBP synthase domain alone. Our results indicate that, in Bradyrhizobium ORS285, the RibBX protein is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis under free-living conditions and we hypothesize that its activity is needed to sustain riboflavin biosynthesis under certain symbiotic conditions.[Formula: see text] Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

  • From Intracellular Bacteria to Differentiated Bacteroids: Transcriptome and Metabolome Analysis in Aeschynomene Nodules Using the Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain ORS285 bclA Mutant
    Journal of bacteriology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Lamouche, Eric Giraud, Anaïs Chaumeret, Olivier Pierre, Ibtissem Guefrachi, Quentin Barrière, Florence Guérard, Françoise Gilard, Yves Dessaux, Bertrand Gakière
    Abstract:

    Soil bacteria called rhizobia trigger the formation of root nodules on legume plants. The rhizobia infect these symbiotic organs and adopt an intracellular lifestyle within the nodule cells, where they differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Several legume lineages force their symbionts into an extreme cellular differentiation, comprising cell enlargement and genome endoreduplication. The antimicrobial peptide transporter BclA is a major determinant of this process in Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285, a symbiont of Aeschynomene spp. In the absence of BclA, the bacteria proceed until the intracellular infection of nodule cells, but they cannot differentiate into enlarged polyploid and functional bacteroids. Thus, the bclA nodule bacteria constitute an intermediate stage between the free-living soil bacteria and the nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Metabolomics on whole nodules of Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica infected with the wild type or the bclA mutant revealed 47 metabolites that differentially accumulated concomitantly with bacteroid differentiation. Bacterial transcriptome analysis of these nodules demonstrated that the intracellular settling of the rhizobia in the symbiotic nodule cells is accompanied by a first transcriptome switch involving several hundred upregulated and downregulated genes and a second switch accompanying the bacteroid differentiation, involving fewer genes but ones that are expressed to extremely elevated levels. The transcriptomes further suggested a dynamic role for oxygen and redox regulation of gene expression during nodule formation and a nonsymbiotic function of BclA. Together, our data uncover the metabolic and gene expression changes that accompany the transition from intracellular bacteria into differentiated nitrogen-fixing bacteroids.IMPORTANCE Legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a major ecological process, fueling the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle with reduced nitrogen. It also represents a promising strategy to reduce the use of chemical nitrogen fertilizers in agriculture, thereby improving its sustainability. This interaction leads to the intracellular accommodation of rhizobia within plant cells of symbiotic organs, where they differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In specific legume clades, this differentiation process requires the bacterial transporter BclA to counteract antimicrobial peptides produced by the host. Transcriptome analysis of Bradyrhizobium wild-type and bclA mutant bacteria in culture and in symbiosis with Aeschynomene host plants dissected the bacterial transcriptional response in distinct phases and highlighted functions of the transporter in the free-living stage of the bacterial life cycle.

  • From intracellular bacteria to differentiated bacteroids: transcriptome and metabolome analysis in Aeschynomene nodules using the Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285 bclA mutant
    Journal of Bacteriology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Lamouche, Eric Giraud, Anaïs Chaumeret, Olivier Pierre, Ibtissem Guefrachi, Quentin Barrière, Florence Guérard, Françoise Gilard, Yves Dessaux, Bertrand Gakière
    Abstract:

    Soil bacteria called rhizobia trigger the formation of root nodules on legume plants. The rhizobia infect these symbiotic organs and adopt an intracellular lifestyle within the nodule cells where they differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Several legume lineages enforce their symbionts into an extreme cellular differentiation, comprising cell enlargement and genome endoreduplication. The antimicrobial peptide transporter BclA is a major determinant of this process in Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285, a symbiont of Aeschynomene spp.. In the absence of BclA, the bacteria proceed until the intracellular infection of nodule cells but they cannot differentiate into enlarged polyploid and functional bacteroids. The bclA nodule bacteria constitute thus an intermediate stage between the free-living soil bacteria and the nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Metabolomics on whole nodules of Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica infected with the wild type or the bclA mutant revealed 47 metabolites that differentially accumulated concomitantly with bacteroid differentiation. Bacterial transcriptome analysis of these nodules demonstrated that the intracellular settling of the rhizobia in the symbiotic nodule cells is accompanied with a first transcriptome switch involving several hundreds of upregulated and downregulated genes and a second switch accompanying the bacteroid differentiation, involving less genes but ones that are expressed to extremely elevated levels. The transcriptomes further suggested a dynamic role for oxygen and redox regulation of gene expression during nodule formation and a non-symbiotic function of BclA. Together, our data uncover the metabolic and gene expression changes that accompany the transition from intracellular bacteria into differentiated nitrogen-fixing bacteroids.ImportanceThe legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a major ecological process fueling the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle with reduced nitrogen. It represents also a promising strategy to cut down the use of chemical nitrogen fertilizers in agriculture, thereby improving its sustainability. This interaction leads to the intracellular accommodation of rhizobia within plant cells of symbiotic organs where they differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In specific legume clades, this differentiation process requires the bacterial transporter BclA to counteract antimicrobial peptides produced by the host. Transcriptome analysis of Bradyrhizobium wild-type and bclA mutant bacteria in culture and in symbiosis with Aeschynomene host plants dissected the bacterial transcriptional response in distinct phases and highlighted functions of the transporter in the free-living stage of the bacterial life cycle.

Joël Fardoux – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Genetics of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia uncovers mechanisms of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis.
    Nature communications, 2021
    Co-Authors: Johan Quilbe, Laurent Brottier, Ronan Rivallan, Joël Fardoux, Leo Lamy, Philippe Leleux, Thomas Benichou, Remi Guyonnet, Manuel Becana, Irene Villar
    Abstract:

    Among legumes (Fabaceae) capable of nitrogen-fixing nodulation, several Aeschynomene spp. use a unique symbiotic process that is independent of Nod factors and infection threads. They are also distinctive in developing root and stem nodules with photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. Despite the significance of these symbiotic features, their understanding remains limited. To overcome such limitations, we conduct genetic studies of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia, supported by the development of a genome sequence for A. evenia and transcriptomic resources for 10 additional Aeschynomene spp. Comparative analysis of symbiotic genes substantiates singular mechanisms in the early and late nodulation steps. A forward genetic screen also shows that AeCRK, coding a receptor-like kinase, and the symbiotic signaling genes AePOLLUX, AeCCamK, AeCYCLOPS, AeNSP2, and AeNIN are required to trigger both root and stem nodulation. This work demonstrates the utility of the A. evenia model and provides a cornerstone to unravel mechanisms underlying the rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

  • genetics of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia uncovers mechanisms of the rhizobium legume symbiosis
    Nature Communications, 2021
    Co-Authors: Johan Quilbe, Laurent Brottier, Ronan Rivallan, Joël Fardoux, Leo Lamy, Philippe Leleux, Thomas Benichou, Remi Guyonnet, Manuel Becana, Irene Villar
    Abstract:

    Among legumes (Fabaceae) capable of nitrogen-fixing nodulation, several Aeschynomene spp. use a unique symbiotic process that is independent of Nod factors and infection threads. They are also distinctive in developing root and stem nodules with photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. Despite the significance of these symbiotic features, their understanding remains limited. To overcome such limitations, we conduct genetic studies of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia, supported by the development of a genome sequence for A. evenia and transcriptomic resources for 10 additional Aeschynomene spp. Comparative analysis of symbiotic genes substantiates singular mechanisms in the early and late nodulation steps. A forward genetic screen also shows that AeCRK, coding a receptor-like kinase, and the symbiotic signaling genes AePOLLUX, AeCCamK, AeCYCLOPS, AeNSP2, and AeNIN are required to trigger both root and stem nodulation. This work demonstrates the utility of the A. evenia model and provides a cornerstone to unravel mechanisms underlying the rhizobium–legume symbiosis. The establishment of symbiotic interaction between Aeschynomene evenia and photosynthetic bradyrhizobia doesn’t involve the canonical Nod factors and infection threads. Here, the authors assemble the draft genome of A. evenia and identify a receptor-like kinase in mediating the symbiotic interaction.

  • Genetics of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia uncovers new mechanisms of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Johan Quilbe, Laurent Brottier, Ronan Rivallan, Joël Fardoux, Leo Lamy, Philippe Leleux, Thomas Benichou, Remi Guyonnet, Manuel Becana, Irene Villar
    Abstract:

    Abstract Among legumes (Fabaceae) capable of nitrogen-fixing nodulation, several Aeschynomene spp. use a unique symbiotic process that is independent of Nod factors and infection threads. They are also distinctive in developing root and stem nodules with photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. Despite the significance of these symbiotic features, their understanding remains limited. To overcome such limitations, we conducted genetic studies of nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia, supported by the development of a genome sequence for A. evenia and transcriptomic resources for 10 additional Aeschynomene spp. Comparative analysis of symbiotic genes substantiated singular mechanisms in the early and late nodulation steps. A forward genetic screen also showed that AeCRK, coding a novel receptor-like kinase, and the symbiotic signaling genes AePOLLUX, AeCCamK, AeCYCLOPS, AeNSP2 and AeNIN, are required to trigger both root and stem nodulation. This work demonstrates the utility of the A. evenia model and provides a cornerstone to unravel new mechanisms underlying the rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

Djamel Gully – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • RibBX of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 Plays an Important Role in Intracellular Persistence in Various Aeschynomene Host Plants.
    Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nico Nouwen, Djamel Gully, Jean-françois Arrighi, Eric Giraud
    Abstract:

    Bradyrhizobium ORS285 forms a nitrogen-fixating symbiosis with both Nod factor (NF)-dependent and NF-independent Aeschynomene spp. The Bradyrhizobium ORS285 ribBA gene encodes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with 3,4-dihydroxybutanone phosphate (3,4-DHBP) synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps in the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we show that inactivating the ribBA gene does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy under free-living conditions and that, as shown for RibBAs from other bacteria, the GTP cyclohydrolase II domain has no enzymatic activity. For this reason, we have renamed the annotated ribBA as ribBX. Because we were unable to identify other ribBA or ribA and ribB homologs in the genome of Bradyrhizobium ORS285, we hypothesize that the ORS285 strain can use unconventional enzymes or an alternative pathway for the initial steps of riboflavin biosynthesis. Inactivating ribBX has a drastic impact on the interaction of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 with many of the tested Aeschynomene spp. In these Aeschynomene spp., the ORS285 ribBX mutant is able to infect the plant host cells but the intracellular infection is not maintained and the nodules senesce early. This phenotype can be complemented by reintroduction of the 3,4-DHBP synthase domain alone. Our results indicate that, in Bradyrhizobium ORS285, the RibBX protein is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis under free-living conditions and we hypothesize that its activity is needed to sustain riboflavin biosynthesis under certain symbiotic conditions.[Formula: see text] Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

  • Transcriptomic dissection of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 in symbiosis with Aeschynomene spp. inducing different bacteroid morphotypes with contrasted symbiotic efficiency
    Environmental Microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Lamouche, Djamel Gully, Nico Nouwen, Joël Fardoux, Anaïs Chaumeret, Camille Verly, Olivier Pierre, Coline Sciallano, Christian Jeudy, Attila Szücs
    Abstract:

    To circumvent the paucity of nitrogen sources in the soil legume plants establish a symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. During symbiosis, the plants form root organs called nodules, where bacteria are housed intracellularly and become active nitrogen fixers known as bacteroids. Depending on their host plant, bacteroids can adopt different morphotypes, being either unmodified (U), elongated (E) or spherical (S). E- and S-type bacteroids undergo a terminal differentiation leading to irreversible morphological changes and DNA endoreduplication. Previous studies suggest that differentiated bacteroids display an increased symbiotic efficiency (E > U and S > U). In this study, we used a combination of Aeschynomene species inducing E- or S-type bacteroids in symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285 to show that S-type bacteroids present a better symbiotic efficiency than E-type bacteroids. We performed a transcriptomic analysis on E- and S-type bacteroids formed by Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica nodules and identified the bacterial functions activated in bacteroids and specific to each bacteroid type. Extending the expression analysis in E- and S-type bacteroids in other Aeschynomene species by qRT-PCR on selected genes from the transcriptome analysis narrowed down the set of bacteroid morphotype-specific genes. Functional analysis of a selected subset of 31 bacteroid-induced or morphotype-specific genes revealed no symbiotic phenotypes in the mutants. This highlights the robustness of the symbiotic program but could also indicate that the bacterial response to the plant environment is partially anticipatory or even maladaptive. Our analysis confirms the correlation between differentiation and efficiency of the bacteroids and provides a framework for the identification of bacterial functions that affect the efficiency of bacteroids.

  • Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain ORS3257, an Efficient Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Isolated from Cowpea in Senegal
    Microbiology Resource Announcements, 2019
    Co-Authors: Antoine Le Quéré, Djamel Gully, Eric Giraud, Stéphane Cruveiller, Joël Fardoux, Albin Teulet, Daniel Gargani, Elisabeth Navarro, Marc Neyra, Tatiana Krasova Wade
    Abstract:

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS3257, which forms efficient symbioses with cowpea, peanut, or groundnut. These genomic data will be useful to identify genes associated with symbiotic performance and host compatibility on several legumes, including Aeschynomene species, with which a Nod-independent type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent symbiosis can be established.

Clémence Chaintreuil – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A phylogenetic framework of the legume genus Aeschynomene for comparative genetic analysis of the Nod-dependent and Nod-independent symbioses.
    BMC plant biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laurent Brottier, Lionel Moulin, Clémence Chaintreuil, Paul Simion, Celine Scornavacca, Ronan Rivallan, Pierre Mournet, Gwilym P. Lewis, Joël Fardoux, Spencer Brown
    Abstract:

    Among semi-aquatic species of the legume genus Aeschynomene, some have the property of being nodulated by photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium lacking the nodABC genes necessary for the synthesis of Nod factors. Knowledge of the specificities underlying this Nod-independent symbiosis has been gained from the model legume Aeschynomene evenia but our understanding remains limited due to the lack of comparative genetics with related taxa using a Nod factor-dependent process. To fill this gap, we combined different approaches to perform a thorough comparative analysis in the genus Aeschynomene. This study significantly broadened previous taxon sampling, including in allied genera, in order to construct a comprehensive phylogeny. In the phylogenetic tree, five main lineages were delineated, including a novel lineage, the Nod-independent clade and another one containing a polytomy that comprised several Aeschynomene groups and all the allied genera. This phylogeny was matched with data on chromosome number, genome size and low-copy nuclear gene sequences to reveal the diploid species and a polytomy containing mostly polyploid taxa. For these taxa, a single allopolyploid origin was inferred and the putative parental lineages were identified. Finally, nodulation tests with different Bradyrhizobium strains revealed new nodulation behaviours and the diploid species outside of the Nod-independent clade were compared for their experimental tractability and genetic diversity. The extended knowledge of the genetics and biology of the different lineages sheds new light of the evolutionary history of the genus Aeschynomene and they provide a solid framework to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in Aeschynomene legumes. Notably, our backbone tree contains all the species that are diploid and it clarifies the genetic relationships between the Nod-independent clade and the Nod-dependent lineages. This study enabled the identification of A. americana and A. patula as the most suitable species to undertake a comparative genetic study of the Nod-independent and Nod-dependent symbioses.

  • A phylogenetic framework of the legume genus Aeschynomene for comparative genetic analysis of the Nod-dependent and Nod-independent symbioses
    BMC Plant Biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laurent Brottier, Lionel Moulin, Clémence Chaintreuil, Paul Simion, Celine Scornavacca, Ronan Rivallan, Pierre Mournet, Joël Fardoux, Gwilym Lewis, Spencer Brown
    Abstract:

    Background: Among semi-aquatic species of the legume genus Aeschynomene, some have the property of being nodulated by photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium lacking the nodABC genes necessary for the synthesis of Nod factors. Knowledge of the specificities underlying this Nod-independent symbiosis has been gained from the model legume Aeschynomene evenia but our understanding remains limited due to the lack of comparative genetics with related taxa using a Nod factor-dependent process. To fill this gap, we combined different approaches to perform a thorough comparative analysis in the genus Aeschynomene. Results: This study significantly broadened previous taxon sampling, including in allied genera, in order to construct a comprehensive phylogeny. In the phylogenetic tree, five main lineages were delineated, including a novel lineage, the Nod-independent clade and another one containing a polytomy that comprised several Aeschynomene groups and all the allied genera. This phylogeny was matched with data on chromosome number, genome size and low-copy nuclear gene sequences to reveal the diploid species and a polytomy containing mostly polyploid taxa. For these taxa, a single allopolyploid origin was inferred and the putative parental lineages were identified. Finally, nodulation tests with different Bradyrhizobium strains revealed new nodulation behaviours and the diploid species outside of the Nod-independent clade were compared for their experimental tractability and genetic diversity. Conclusions: The extended knowledge of the genetics and biology of the different lineages sheds new light of the evolutionary history of the genus Aeschynomene and they provide a solid framework to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in Aeschynomene legumes. Notably, our backbone tree contains all the species that are diploid and it clarifies the genetic relationships between the Nod-independent clade and the Nod-dependent lineages. This study enabled the identification of A. americana and A. patula as the most suitable species to undertake a comparative genetic study of the Nod-independent and Nod-dependent symbioses.

  • Naturally occurring variations in the nod-independent model legume Aeschynomene evenia and relatives: a resource for nodulation genetics.
    BMC plant biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Clémence Chaintreuil, Laurent Brottier, Ronan Rivallan, Gwilym P. Lewis, Joël Fardoux, Xavier Perrier, Guillaume Martin, Mario Gomez-pacheco, Mickaël Bourges, Leo Lamy
    Abstract:

    Among semi-aquatic species of the legume genus Aeschynomene, some have the unique property of being root and stem-nodulated by photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium lacking the nodABC genes necessary for the production of Nod factors. These species provide an excellent biological system with which to explore the evolution of nodulation in legumes. Among them, Aeschynomene evenia has emerged as a model legume to undertake the genetic dissection of the so-called Nod-independent symbiosis. In addition to the genetic analysis of nodulation on a reference line, natural variation in a germplasm collection could also be surveyed to uncover genetic determinants of nodulation. To this aim, we investigated the patterns of genetic diversity in a collection of 226 Nod-independent Aeschynomene accessions. A combination of phylogenetic analyses, comprising ITS and low-copy nuclear genes, along with cytogenetic experiments and artificial hybridizations revealed the richness of the Nod-independent Aeschynomene group with the identification of 13 diploid and 6 polyploid well-differentiated taxa. A set of 54 SSRs was used to further delineate taxon boundaries and to identify different genotypes. Patterns of microsatellite diversity also illuminated the genetic basis of the Aeschynomene taxa that were all found to be predominantly autogamous and with a predicted simple disomic inheritance, two attributes favorable for genetics. In addition, taxa displaying a pronounced genetic diversity, notably A. evenia, A. indica and A. sensitiva, were characterized by a clear geographically-based genetic structure and variations in root and stem nodulation. A well-characterized germplasm collection now exists as a major genetic resource to thoroughly explore the natural variation of nodulation in response to different bradyrhizobial strains. Symbiotic polymorphisms are expected to be found notably in the induction of nodulation, in nitrogen fixation and also in stem nodulation. Subsequent genetic analysis and locus mapping will pave the way for the identification of the underlying genes through forward or reverse genetics. Such discoveries will significantly contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning how some Aeschynomene species can be efficiently nodulated in a Nod-independent fashion.

Nico Nouwen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • RibBX of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 Plays an Important Role in Intracellular Persistence in Various Aeschynomene Host Plants.
    Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nico Nouwen, Djamel Gully, Jean-françois Arrighi, Eric Giraud
    Abstract:

    Bradyrhizobium ORS285 forms a nitrogen-fixating symbiosis with both Nod factor (NF)-dependent and NF-independent Aeschynomene spp. The Bradyrhizobium ORS285 ribBA gene encodes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with 3,4-dihydroxybutanone phosphate (3,4-DHBP) synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps in the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we show that inactivating the ribBA gene does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy under free-living conditions and that, as shown for RibBAs from other bacteria, the GTP cyclohydrolase II domain has no enzymatic activity. For this reason, we have renamed the annotated ribBA as ribBX. Because we were unable to identify other ribBA or ribA and ribB homologs in the genome of Bradyrhizobium ORS285, we hypothesize that the ORS285 strain can use unconventional enzymes or an alternative pathway for the initial steps of riboflavin biosynthesis. Inactivating ribBX has a drastic impact on the interaction of Bradyrhizobium ORS285 with many of the tested Aeschynomene spp. In these Aeschynomene spp., the ORS285 ribBX mutant is able to infect the plant host cells but the intracellular infection is not maintained and the nodules senesce early. This phenotype can be complemented by reintroduction of the 3,4-DHBP synthase domain alone. Our results indicate that, in Bradyrhizobium ORS285, the RibBX protein is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis under free-living conditions and we hypothesize that its activity is needed to sustain riboflavin biosynthesis under certain symbiotic conditions.[Formula: see text] Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

  • Transcriptomic dissection of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 in symbiosis with Aeschynomene spp. inducing different bacteroid morphotypes with contrasted symbiotic efficiency
    Environmental Microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Lamouche, Djamel Gully, Nico Nouwen, Joël Fardoux, Anaïs Chaumeret, Camille Verly, Olivier Pierre, Coline Sciallano, Christian Jeudy, Attila Szücs
    Abstract:

    To circumvent the paucity of nitrogen sources in the soil legume plants establish a symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. During symbiosis, the plants form root organs called nodules, where bacteria are housed intracellularly and become active nitrogen fixers known as bacteroids. Depending on their host plant, bacteroids can adopt different morphotypes, being either unmodified (U), elongated (E) or spherical (S). E- and S-type bacteroids undergo a terminal differentiation leading to irreversible morphological changes and DNA endoreduplication. Previous studies suggest that differentiated bacteroids display an increased symbiotic efficiency (E > U and S > U). In this study, we used a combination of Aeschynomene species inducing E- or S-type bacteroids in symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285 to show that S-type bacteroids present a better symbiotic efficiency than E-type bacteroids. We performed a transcriptomic analysis on E- and S-type bacteroids formed by Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica nodules and identified the bacterial functions activated in bacteroids and specific to each bacteroid type. Extending the expression analysis in E- and S-type bacteroids in other Aeschynomene species by qRT-PCR on selected genes from the transcriptome analysis narrowed down the set of bacteroid morphotype-specific genes. Functional analysis of a selected subset of 31 bacteroid-induced or morphotype-specific genes revealed no symbiotic phenotypes in the mutants. This highlights the robustness of the symbiotic program but could also indicate that the bacterial response to the plant environment is partially anticipatory or even maladaptive. Our analysis confirms the correlation between differentiation and efficiency of the bacteroids and provides a framework for the identification of bacterial functions that affect the efficiency of bacteroids.

  • Transcriptomic dissection of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 in symbiosis with Aeschynomene spp. inducing different bacteroid morphotypes with contrasted symbiotic efficiency.
    Environmental microbiology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Florian Lamouche, Djamel Gully, Nico Nouwen, Joël Fardoux, Anaïs Chaumeret, Camille Verly, Olivier Pierre, Coline Sciallano, Christian Jeudy, Attila Szücs
    Abstract:

    To circumvent the paucity of nitrogen sources in the soil legume plants establish a symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. During symbiosis, the plants form root organs called nodules, where bacteria are housed intracellularly and become active nitrogen fixers known as bacteroids. Depending on their host plant, bacteroids can adopt different morphotypes, being either unmodified (U), elongated (E) or spherical (S). E- and S-type bacteroids undergo a terminal differentiation leading to irreversible morphological changes and DNA endoreduplication. Previous studies suggest that differentiated bacteroids display an increased symbiotic efficiency (E > U and S > U). In this study, we used a combination of Aeschynomene species inducing E- or S-type bacteroids in symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285 to show that S-type bacteroids present a better symbiotic efficiency than E-type bacteroids. We performed a transcriptomic analysis on E- and S-type bacteroids formed by Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica nodules and identified the bacterial functions activated in bacteroids and specific to each bacteroid type. Extending the expression analysis in E- and S-type bacteroids in other Aeschynomene species by qRT-PCR on selected genes from the transcriptome analysis narrowed down the set of bacteroid morphotype-specific genes. Functional analysis of a selected subset of 31 bacteroid-induced or morphotype-specific genes revealed no symbiotic phenotypes in the mutants. This highlights the robustness of the symbiotic program but could also indicate that the bacterial response to the plant environment is partially anticipatory or even maladaptive. Our analysis confirms the correlation between differentiation and efficiency of the bacteroids and provides a framework for the identification of bacterial functions that affect the efficiency of bacteroids.© 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.