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Agreeableness

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Michael D. Robinson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • You Are What You See and Choose: Agreeableness and Situation Selection
    Journal of personality, 2014
    Co-Authors: Konrad Bresin, Michael D. Robinson

    Abstract:

    Agreeableness positively predicts subjective well-being, but why does it do so? Recent theorizing has highlighted possible substrates related to emotion regulation. Following suit, the present studies focus on the situation selection stage of the emotion regulation sequence. Undergraduate participants reported on their Agreeableness levels and completed a picture-viewing task (Studies 1 and 2) or a media choice task (Study 3). Studies 1 and 2 found that the tendency to view negative pictures for a longer period of time than positive pictures was evident at low levels of Agreeableness and absent at high levels. The Study 3 paradigm asked individuals whether they typically choose to expose themselves to positive or negative stimuli across diverse media sources. Preferences for positive media were more pronounced at higher levels of Agreeableness. The results have systematic implications for understanding the emotional lives of disagreeable versus agreeable people.

  • response speed as an individual difference its role in moderating the Agreeableness anger relationship
    Journal of Research in Personality, 2012
    Co-Authors: Konrad Bresin, Benjamin M. Wilkowski, Clayton J Hilmert, Michael D. Robinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Anger is an emotion that is precipitated by hostile attitudes and high arousal. The trait of Agreeableness is a moderately inverse predictor of hostile attitudes and anger. Relations between Agreeableness and anger are likely to be stronger to the extent that the person can be characterized as high in dispositional arousal. Arousal-related manipulations speed responses in cognitive tasks. Thus, individual differences in response speed may be informative concerning general tendencies toward aroused states. In three studies (N = 319) individual differences in response speed in basic choice tasks interacted with Agreeableness to predict state-related experiences of anger. Specifically, the highest levels of anger were observed among fast/disagreeable individuals. The utility of this probe in future studies is discussed.

  • CAN Agreeableness TURN GRAY SKIES BLUE? A ROLE FOR Agreeableness IN MODERATING NEUROTICISM-LINKED DYSPHORIA
    Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Scott Ode, Michael D. Robinson

    Abstract:

    Higher levels of Agreeableness have been linked to lower levels of anger and aggression. A premise of the present work is that Agreeableness may play a much broader role in regulating negative emotions, particularly among distress-prone individuals. In this connection, the present investigation (total N = 245) examined the novel hypothesis that Agreeableness would moderate neuroticism-linked tendencies toward depressive symptoms. Studies 1 and 2 found support for this hypothesis by showing that relations between neuroticism and depressive symptoms were stronger among individuals low in Agreeableness. Study 3 provided support for an emotion-regulation view of such interactions in an implicit affective priming paradigm. As hypothesized, tendencies toward negative affective priming were especially pronounced among individuals high in neuroticism and low in Agreeableness. The discussion focuses on the respective roles of neuroticism and Agreeableness in understanding and mitigating symptoms of potential clini…

Bethany Liddle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Agreeableness is related to social cognitive but not social perceptual theory of mind
    European Journal of Personality, 2008
    Co-Authors: Daniel Nettle, Bethany Liddle

    Abstract:

    We hypothesise on a number of grounds that the personality dimension of Agreeableness may be associated with inter-individual differences in theory of mind (ToM) functioning. However, it is important to distinguish social-perceptual from social-cognitive ToM. Previous findings on ToM in psychopathic individuals, sex differences in ToM and the associations between ToM and social relationships, all suggest that social-cognitive ToM is more likely than social-perceptual ToM to relate to Agreeableness. In separate empirical studies, we find that Agreeableness is substantially correlated with socialcognitive ToM performance, but uncorrelated with social-perceptual ToM performance. We suggest that the propensity or motivation to attend to the mental states of others may be central to the personality dimension of Agreeableness. Copyright # 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Agreeableness is related to social‐cognitive, but not social‐perceptual, theory of mind
    European Journal of Personality, 2008
    Co-Authors: Daniel Nettle, Bethany Liddle

    Abstract:

    We hypothesise on a number of grounds that the personality dimension of Agreeableness may be associated with inter-individual differences in theory of mind (ToM) functioning. However, it is important to distinguish social-perceptual from social-cognitive ToM. Previous findings on ToM in psychopathic individuals, sex differences in ToM and the associations between ToM and social relationships, all suggest that social-cognitive ToM is more likely than social-perceptual ToM to relate to Agreeableness. In separate empirical studies, we find that Agreeableness is substantially correlated with socialcognitive ToM performance, but uncorrelated with social-perceptual ToM performance. We suggest that the propensity or motivation to attend to the mental states of others may be central to the personality dimension of Agreeableness. Copyright # 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Benjamin M. Wilkowski – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • response speed as an individual difference its role in moderating the Agreeableness anger relationship
    Journal of Research in Personality, 2012
    Co-Authors: Konrad Bresin, Benjamin M. Wilkowski, Clayton J Hilmert, Michael D. Robinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Anger is an emotion that is precipitated by hostile attitudes and high arousal. The trait of Agreeableness is a moderately inverse predictor of hostile attitudes and anger. Relations between Agreeableness and anger are likely to be stronger to the extent that the person can be characterized as high in dispositional arousal. Arousal-related manipulations speed responses in cognitive tasks. Thus, individual differences in response speed may be informative concerning general tendencies toward aroused states. In three studies (N = 319) individual differences in response speed in basic choice tasks interacted with Agreeableness to predict state-related experiences of anger. Specifically, the highest levels of anger were observed among fast/disagreeable individuals. The utility of this probe in future studies is discussed.

  • can one s temper be cooled a role for Agreeableness in moderating neuroticism s influence on anger and aggression
    Journal of Research in Personality, 2008
    Co-Authors: Scott Ode, Michael D. Robinson, Benjamin M. Wilkowski

    Abstract:

    The study followed from the idea that neuroticism captures hot or facilitative vulnerabilities related to anger and aggression, whereas Agreeableness captures cool or inhibitory processes in relation to these same outcomes. As such, it was predicted that neuroticism and Agreeableness should interact to predict anger and aggression according to hot/cool models of self-regulation. This hypothesis was systematically examined among three independent samples of participants (total N = 176). As predicted, neuroticism and Agreeableness interacted to predict anger and aggression among all samples, and did so in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that neuroticism-anger relations would be lower at high levels of Agreeableness. The results therefore highlight the distinct roles of neuroticism and Agreeableness in predicting anger and aggression, while placing these traits in a common interactive self-regulatory framework.

  • Can One’s Temper be Cooled?: A Role for Agreeableness in Moderating Neuroticism’s Influence on Anger and Aggression
    Journal of research in personality, 2008
    Co-Authors: Scott Ode, Michael D. Robinson, Benjamin M. Wilkowski

    Abstract:

    The study followed from the idea that neuroticism captures hot or facilitative vulnerabilities related to anger and aggression, whereas Agreeableness captures cool or inhibitory processes in relation to these same outcomes. As such, it was predicted that neuroticism and Agreeableness should interact to predict anger and aggression according to hot/cool models of self-regulation. This hypothesis was systematically examined among three independent samples of participants (total N = 176). As predicted, neuroticism and Agreeableness interacted to predict anger and aggression among all samples, and did so in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that neuroticism-anger relations would be lower at high levels of Agreeableness. The results therefore highlight the distinct roles of neuroticism and Agreeableness in predicting anger and aggression, while placing these traits in a common interactive self-regulatory framework.