Agricultural Marketing - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Agricultural Marketing

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Stephen Jones – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Agricultural Marketing and pricing reform a review of experience
    World Development, 1993
    Co-Authors: Alex Duncan, Stephen Jones

    Abstract:

    Abstract South Africa, like many other countries, has in the past pursued a highly interventionist policy in Agricultural Marketing and pricing, but has recently embarked on a process of at least partial liberalization. The paper reviews the reasons for, nature of, and impact of Marketing reform in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere. It concludes that the results of reform have in general been positive, although implementation has been more difficult and time- consuming than originally expected, in part because of interest-group politics and in part because of its inherent complexity. The paper highlights some issues of particular relevance to South Africa’s current political and economic transition.

Lawrence D Smith – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • malawi reforming the state s role in Agricultural Marketing
    Food Policy, 1995
    Co-Authors: Lawrence D Smith

    Abstract:

    Abstract The role of the state in Agricultural Marketing activities has been a contentious issue in many countries undergoing structural adjustment. This paper examines three examples of smallholder market reform in Malawi to illustrate the case for various forms of state involvement and the complexities involved in reducing the state’s role when this is required.

João Cravinho – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Frelimo and the Politics of Agricultural Marketing in Mozambique
    Journal of Southern African Studies, 1998
    Co-Authors: João Cravinho

    Abstract:

    The Frelimo government in Mozambique pinned its hopes for rapid and widespread socialist modernisation of the country upon the Agricultural sector. During the two decades since independence, the precise role which the government wished the Agricultural sector to fulfil has changed, and the changing regulation of Agricultural Marketing reflects the new priorities. The most important instrument devised by the government to deal with problems related to Marketing was the state Marketing board, Agricom. This paper seeks to show how state intervention through Agricom and through other instruments frequently had unintended effects which resulted in new dynamics and situations to which the government and other economic agents had to respond. Despite being under great pressure from the government in the first decade of independence, the private sector was able to exploit opportunities which appeared as a result of state intervention, whereas state attempts to centralise decision‐making had the perverse effect of …

  • Frelimo and the politics of Agricultural Marketing in Mozambique
    Journal of Southern African Studies, 1998
    Co-Authors: João Cravinho

    Abstract:

    When Frelimo came to power in Mozambique in 1975, it pinned its hopes for rapid and widespread socialist modernization of the country upon the Agricultural sector. The most important instrument to deal with problems related to Agricultural Marketing was the State Marketing board, Agricom, established in 1981. Although Agricom was not designed to assume exclusive responsibility for Marketing, it was seen as the leading institution in that field. Private traders, consumer cooperatives and others all had a role but they were to fall in line behind Agricom which was responsible for ‘regulating, directing and supporting’ Agricultural Marketing in general. However, Agricom never had any autonomy regarding the first two of these tasks. As for supporting others involved in Marketing, Agricom was to use any resources of its own that it could spare, such as transport, sacks and warehouse space. The key problem, however, was the political environment. Over the years the political context changed and Agricom began to lose its original purpose of instrument for transformation. Paralysed in a confusion of authority and responsibility, the organization was incapable of adapting over time as the political environment and the economic and social context changed. Notes, ref., sum.