Air Transport - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Air Transport

The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ruwantissa Abeyratne – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Artificial Intelligence and Air Transport
    Megatrends and Air Transport, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ruwantissa Abeyratne

    Abstract:

    There is no doubt that artificial intelligence (AI) will play a prominent role in Air Transport, assisting professionals in the field in developing the industry to deliver even safer Air Transport while reducing its environmental impact. The term “artificial intelligence” has been challenged as connoting emotional intelligence that humans possess. Scientists cannot even imagine a time where computers would acquire emotional intelligence. IBM advocates terms such as “cognitive computing” or “augmented intelligence” to describe what is popularly known as AI for this reason. In this context, AI forms two broad categories: knowledge based intelligence delivered by knowledge based systems (KBS) and computational intelligence which involve neural networks fuzzy systems and evolutionary computing. The former is applied based on the reliance placed by information provided by a human (such as rules and algorithms) while the latter delivers through networks of computational systems. Air Transport involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data but is primarily governed by human involvement, whether in maintenance, Air traffic control or flight deck management. This factor makes it difficult to entirely rely upon mathematical computations or non emotive reasoning in Air Transport.

  • Competition and Investment in Air Transport: Legal and Economic Issues
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Ruwantissa Abeyratne

    Abstract:

    The future of Air Transport law.- Competition in aerospace travel.- Competition and the environment.- Competition and safety.- Competition and innovation in Air Transport.- Market access and subsidies in Air Transport – The US-UAE debate and WTO.- Achieving competitive advantage through connectivity and innovation – An application in Airline hubbing.- Competition and open skies.- The NAFTA free trade model.- Competition law in Air Transport.- Air Transport and the law of investment.- Conclusion.- Appendix.

  • Competition and Innovation in Air Transport
    Competition and Investment in Air Transport, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ruwantissa Abeyratne

    Abstract:

    Air Transport is a different animal from other aspects of trade, in that it is circumscribed by the need for Airlines to obtain permission of the grantor State to obtain market access. In this context, how does one approach market access in the coming decades. At the most fundamental level, the advantages of free trade as would apply to Air Transport would be that it would encourage States to trade freely with their trading partners which would in turn help in the growth of the global economy; it would give the consumer a better choice of products and competition generated by free trade would bring down the price of the product. Arguments against free trade in Air Transport would be that globalization and liberalization will take jobs away from a State; the limit of imports would keep money in the State; free trade could be a threat to national security and a State could develop dependence on the expertise of other more advanced States. Free trade increases national wealth and promotes foreign investment, both of which are absent in the present structure of market access in many States.

Kenneth Button – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Air Transport Liberalization – Air Transport Liberalization
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Matthias Finger, Kenneth Button

    Abstract:

    This groundbreaking book offers a critical and wide-ranging assessment of the global Air Transport liberalization process over the past 40 years. This compilation of world experts on Air Transport economics, policy, and regulation is timely and significant, considering that Air Transport is currently facing a series of new challenges due to technological changes, the emergence of new markets, and increased security concerns.

  • Air Transport Networks
    , 2000
    Co-Authors: Kenneth Button, Roger R. Stough

    Abstract:

    Air Transport Networks provides an economic analysis of the way in which the Air Transport industry operates and the nature of the policies that have been adopted to regulate the sector.

  • Workshop report on European Air Transport scenarios
    Open Access publications, 1998
    Co-Authors: Aisling J. Reynolds-feighan, Kenneth Button

    Abstract:

    The aim of this small workshop of invited participants was to consider the prospects for the development of European Air Transport over the next two decades. It forms part of the Air Transport component of the EU’s 4th Framework Programme’s project MINIMISE (Managing Interoperability by Improvements in Transport System Organisation in Europe) and seeks to provide some expert views on how Air Transport policy at the Union level will need to evolve in order to meet the challenges of achieving optimal interoperability in the medium term. The overall project is multimodal in its orientation but this workshop touches upon other modes only in so far as they are relevant for the development of interoperability in the Air Transport sector. Interoperability can be defined in terms of reducing excessive impediments to the optimal efficiency with which various providers and users of passenger and freight Transport can interact. The aim of the workshop was to provide for a wide ranging discussion, focused around a number of predetermined issues. These issues are -Development of external EU Air Transport relations -Policy regarding strategic Airline alliances -Criteria for awarding subsidies for social based Air services -Policy on predatory behaviour by Airlines -The development of EU Air cargo Transport -Charging for the use of EU Air Transport infrastructure -Criteria for investing in new EU Airport capacity. -The creation of improved Air traffic management -Integration Air Transport with other modes The aim is not to come up with a blue print as to how these and other issues may be resolved but rather to consider how the adoption of different policy options within a variety of alternative futures (e.g. a larger EU area, faster or slower economic growth) will impact on EU Air Transport. The number of futures to be considered is very small, and involved taking just one or two extreme possibilities alongside an ‘Expected Future’. The workshop took place at the Bartlett School, University College, London, UK, on 19th December 1997, and involved a small number of invited attendees. This report sets out the workshop’s discussions. Participants were not expected to produce any documentation, the report being written and revised in the light of participant feedback, by MINIMISE members.

Vladimir Smrz – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Security and risk management for Air Transport
    43rd Annual 2009 International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R.a Volner, Vladimir Smrz

    Abstract:

    This paper describes a new intelligent control and diagnostic system for public Air Transport. System operation modes and diagnostic methods were studied during hard/ and software development of public Air Transport. To provide safe operation of equipment, the most important functions are rapid pinpointing of faults and evaluation of defective systems, devices and components.

  • Security and crisis management for Air Transport
    2008 42nd Annual IEEE International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology, 2008
    Co-Authors: R.a Volner, Vladimir Smrz

    Abstract:

    This paper describes a new intelligent control and diagnostic system for public Air Transport. System operation modes and diagnostic methods were studied during hard/ and software development of public Air Transport. To provide safe operation of equipment, the most important functions are rapid pinpointing of faults and evaluation of defective systems, devices and components.