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Amyotrophy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 276 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Nens Van Alfen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • phrenic neuropathy and diaphragm dysfunction in neuralgic Amyotrophy
    Neurology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Jonne Doorduin, Marieke H Van Rosmalen, Yvonne F Heijdra, Andrea J Boon, Michael A Gaytant, Ries J M Van Den Biggelaar, Roy T M Sprooten, Peter J Wijkstra

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical phenotype and recovery of diaphragm dysfunction caused by neuralgic Amyotrophy in a large cohort of patients, to improve accurate awareness of this entity, and to encourage adoption of a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: This observational cohort study recruited adult patients with neuralgic Amyotrophy and symptoms of idiopathic phrenic neuropathy from the database of the Dutch expert center for neuralgic Amyotrophy and the Dutch centers for home mechanical ventilation. Demographic and clinical information on diagnosis, symptoms, and recovery was obtained from chart review. We attempted to contact all patients for a follow-up interview. RESULTS: Phrenic neuropathy occurs in 7.6% of patients with neuralgic Amyotrophy. Unilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction and bilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction are frequently symptomatic, causing exertional dyspnea, orthopnea, disturbed sleep, and excessive fatigue. Diagnostic practices varied widely and were often not optimally targeted. The majority of patients experienced at least moderate recovery within 2 years. CONCLUSION: We recommend screening every patient with neuralgic Amyotrophy for diaphragm dysfunction by asking about orthopnea and by performing upright and supine vital capacity screening and diaphragm ultrasound in cases of suspected phrenic neuropathy to optimize diagnosis and care.

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    textabstractObjective Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. Methods In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. Results Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. RESULTS: Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.

Floris A Van De Laar – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    textabstractObjective Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. Methods In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. Results Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. RESULTS: Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.

Jeroen J J Van Eijk – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • phrenic neuropathy and diaphragm dysfunction in neuralgic Amyotrophy
    Neurology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Jonne Doorduin, Marieke H Van Rosmalen, Yvonne F Heijdra, Andrea J Boon, Michael A Gaytant, Ries J M Van Den Biggelaar, Roy T M Sprooten, Peter J Wijkstra

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical phenotype and recovery of diaphragm dysfunction caused by neuralgic Amyotrophy in a large cohort of patients, to improve accurate awareness of this entity, and to encourage adoption of a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: This observational cohort study recruited adult patients with neuralgic Amyotrophy and symptoms of idiopathic phrenic neuropathy from the database of the Dutch expert center for neuralgic Amyotrophy and the Dutch centers for home mechanical ventilation. Demographic and clinical information on diagnosis, symptoms, and recovery was obtained from chart review. We attempted to contact all patients for a follow-up interview. RESULTS: Phrenic neuropathy occurs in 7.6% of patients with neuralgic Amyotrophy. Unilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction and bilateral diaphragmatic dysfunction are frequently symptomatic, causing exertional dyspnea, orthopnea, disturbed sleep, and excessive fatigue. Diagnostic practices varied widely and were often not optimally targeted. The majority of patients experienced at least moderate recovery within 2 years. CONCLUSION: We recommend screening every patient with neuralgic Amyotrophy for diaphragm dysfunction by asking about orthopnea and by performing upright and supine vital capacity screening and diaphragm ultrasound in cases of suspected phrenic neuropathy to optimize diagnosis and care.

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    textabstractObjective Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. Methods In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. Results Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.

  • incidence of neuralgic Amyotrophy parsonage turner syndrome in a primary care setting a prospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Nens Van Alfen, Jeroen J J Van Eijk, Tessa Ennik, Sean O Flynn, Inge E G Nobacht, Jan T Groothuis, Sigrid Pillen, Floris A Van De Laar

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: Neuralgic Amyotrophy is considered a rare peripheral nervous system disorder but in practice seems grossly under recognized, which negatively affects care for these patients. In this study we prospectively counted the one-year incidence rate of classic neuralgic Amyotrophy in a primary care setting. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study during the year 2012 we registered all new cases of neck, shoulder or arm complaints from two large primary care centers serving a population of 14,118. Prior to study, general practitioners received a short training on how to diagnose classic neuralgic Amyotrophy. Neuralgic Amyotrophy was defined according to published criteria irrespective of family history. Only patients with a classic phenotype were counted as definite cases. After inclusion, patients with suspected neuralgic Amyotrophy who had not yet seen a neurologist were offered neurologic evaluation for diagnostic confirmation. RESULTS: Of the 492 patients identified with new onset neck, shoulder or arm complaints, 34 were suspected of having neuralgic Amyotrophy. After neurologic evaluation the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 patients. This amounts to a one-year incidence rate for classic neuralgic Amyotrophy of 1 per 1000. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that neuralgic Amyotrophy is 30-50 times more common than previously thought. Unawareness of the disorder and its clinical presentation seems the most likely explanation for this difference. An incidence rate of 1 per 1000 and the long-term sequelae many patients suffer warrant more vigilance in diagnosing the disorder, to pave the way for timely treatment and prevent complications.