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Androecium

The Experts below are selected from a list of 303 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Hugh D. Wilson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Lagenaria siceraria 2
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Hugh D. Wilson

    Abstract:

    Lagenaria siceraria, Staminate flower with Androecium. Family Cucurbitaceae, Subclass Dilleniidae.

  • Tradescantia subacaulis (Native) 10
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Hugh D. Wilson

    Abstract:

    Tradescantia subacaulis, Flower – Androecium. Family Commelinaceae, Subclass Commelinidae. Origin: Native.

  • Kosteletzkya virginica (Cultivated) 2
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Hugh D. Wilson

    Abstract:

    Kosteletzkya virginica, Androecium from side. Family Malvaceae, Subclass Dilleniidae. Origin: Cultivated.

Jurg Schonenberger – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • early floral development and Androecium organization in the sarracenioid clade actinidiaceae roridulaceae and sarraceniaceae of ericales
    Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stefan D Lofstrand, Maria Von Balthazar, Jurg Schonenberger

    Abstract:

    The early floral development of Actinidia (A. arguta, A. callosa, A. chinensis and A. kolomikta; Actinidiaceae), Saurauia (S. montana, S. oldhamii, S. pittieri and S. subspinosa; Actinidiaceae), Roridula gorgonias (Roridulaceae) and Heliamphora nutans (Sarraceniaceae) was studied comparatively using scanning electron microscopy. Late stages of Androecium development are additionally presented for Clematoclethra scandens (Actinidiaceae), Darlingtonia californica and Sarracenia leucophylla (Sarraceniaceae). Flowers are typically pentamerous and share a number of developmental features: perianth organs emerge in a clockwise or anticlockwise spiral sequence on the floral apex with relatively long plastochrons between successive organs, resulting in conspicuous size differences among perianth organs in early development; the perianth always consists of two differentiated whorls (unlike earlier interpretations of the perianth in Heliamphora); the Androecium is polystemonous in most species and is initiated with leading stamens in alternipetalous positions; successive stamen primordia appear in a lateral succession until a ring‐like structure is formed; and the anthers become inverted shortly before anthesis. Later androecial development differs conspicuously between taxa and further proliferation may be centrifugal, centripetal and/or lateral. For Ericales, unusual features of floral development include: petals initiated in a spiral sequence (but later organized in a whorl) with comparatively long plastochrons between individual petals (except Saurauia); common occurrence of perianth organs in double positions in Actinidiaceae; and anthers that become inverted close to anthesis. The floral development in the sarracenioids is additionally compared with that of other families and clades in Ericales, further emphasizing the highly variable patterns of Androecium development in the order.

  • Early floral development of Pentaphylacaceae (Ericales) and its systematic implications
    Plant Systematics and Evolution, 2014
    Co-Authors: Rui-ju Zhang, Jurg Schonenberger

    Abstract:

    Early floral development of four species from the genera Anneslea, Cleyera, Eurya, and Ternstroemia of Pentaphylacaceae, was studied comparatively using scanning electron microscopy. Together with earlier studies in Euryodendron and Adinandra, 6 out of 12 genera of Pentaphylacaceae have now been studied for their floral development. The usually pentamerous flowers of these taxa share a number of developmental features: the perianth organs appear in a clockwise or anticlockwise spiral sequence on the floral apex with relatively long plastochrons between successive organs, resulting in conspicuous size differences among perianth organs during early developmental stages. The early development of the usually polystemonous Androecium is characterized by an indistinct ring-primordium and a mostly concave floral apex; individual stamens appear subsequently on this ring-primordium. However, further development of the Androecium differs conspicuously among taxa and we describe three main developmental patterns for the family including features such as centripetal stamen whorls and stamens fascicles. Unusual features of floral development and organization of Pentaphylacaceae include: (1) a pronounced spiral sequence of organ appearance during early floral development in perianth and Androecium; (2) the occurrence of paired organs in the corolla and the Androecium of some species; (3) sepals and petals that are positioned opposite from each other in the genera Anneslea and Ternstroemia; and (4) a concave floral apex at the beginning of Androecium development. From a systematic point of view our results clearly support a close relationship between Anneslea and Ternstroemia and also suggest a closer relationship among Adinandra, Cleyera, and Euryodendron on the one hand and between Eurya and Visnea on the other. Further, our developmental study stresses the differences between Pentaphylacaceae and Theaceae, which earlier where thought to form a natural group of plants. While high stamen numbers are achieved via centripetal pattern of stamen formation in the former family, stamens are formed centrifugally in the latter.

  • early floral development and Androecium organization in fouquieriaceae ericales
    Plant Systematics and Evolution, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jurg Schonenberger, A Grenhagen

    Abstract:

    Early floral development with focus on the Androecium was studied with the help of scanning electron microscopy and serial microtome sectioning in Fouquieria columnaris and F. splendens. Perianth organs appear in a spiral pattern on the floral apex. The spiral may be a clockwise or anti-clockwise. The Androecium is best interpreted as two-whorled with all the stamens arranged in a single series. In F. splendens, two or more of the five epipetalous stamen positions are doubled, i.e. they are occupied by stamen pairs. Unusual features in the floral development of Fouquieriaceae include (1) a strong spiral component even in whorled organ categories and (2) a pronouncedly asymmetric floral apex during an early phase of floral development. From a phylogenetic point of view, it seems plausible that the common ancestor of Fouquieriaceae and its sister family Polemoniaceae was characterized by two alternating, pentamerous stamen-whorls.

Roy E. Gereau – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rubiacearum Americanarum Magna Hama Pars XXVII: Six New Species and a New Taxonomic View of Posoqueria
    Novon, 2011
    Co-Authors: Charlotte M Taylor, Barry Hammel, Roy E. Gereau

    Abstract:

    The Neotropical genus Posoqueria Aubl. (Rubiaceae) has a number of species with an asymmetric Androecium and pollen catapult mechanism and others that apparently lack these features. A new taxonomy based on corolla form and size, the length and symmetry of the filaments, and fruit morphology finds the name P. panamensis (Walp. & Duchass.) Walp. to be a synonym of P. latifolia (Rudge) Roem. & Schult. and distinguishes additional species in southern Central America and northwestern South America, newly described here: P. chocoana C. M. Taylor of wet lowland Panama to northwestern Ecuador has medium-sized corollas, subglobose fruits, corolla lobes of unequal size, and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. correana C. M. Taylor of lowland and premontane Panama has medium-sized corollas, leaf blades that are sharply acute at the apex and densely velutinous abaxially, slightly unequal corolla lobes, and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. costaricensis C. M. Taylor, found in premontane forests in Costa Rica and Panama, has relatively short corollas (for Posoqueria) and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. grandifructa Hammel & C. M. Taylor of lowland Nicaragua and Costa Rica has medium-sized corollas, relatively large, ellipsoid, rough-surfaced, thick-walled fruits, and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. longifilamentosa C. M. Taylor of lowland northwestern Ecuador has relatively long corollas and an asymmetric Androecium with a pollen catapult mechanism, relatively long unequal filaments, and relatively large anthers; and P. robusta Hammel & C. M. Taylor of lowland Nicaragua and Costa Rica has leathery leaves, relatively long corollas with unequal lobes, subglobose leathery fruits, and a symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism.

  • Rubiacearum Americanarum Magna Hama Pars XXVII: Six New Species and a New Taxonomic View of Posoqueria
    Novon: A Journal for Botanical Nomenclature, 2011
    Co-Authors: Charlotte M Taylor, Barry Hammel, Roy E. Gereau

    Abstract:

    Abstract.? The Neotropical genus Posoqueria Aubl. (Rubiaceae) has a number of species with an asymmetric Androecium and pollen catapult mechanism and others that apparently lack these features. A new taxonomy based on corolla form and size, the length and symmetry of the filaments, and fruit morphology finds the name P. panamensis (Walp. P. correana C. M. Taylor of lowland and premontane Panama has medium-sized corollas, leaf blades that are sharply acute at the apex and densely velutinous abaxially, slightly unequal corolla lobes, and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. costaricensis C. M. Taylor, found in premontane forests in Costa Rica and Panama, has relatively short corollas (for Posoqueria) and a generally symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism; P. grandifructa Hammel P. longifilamentosa C. M. Taylor of lowland northwestern Ecuador has relatively long corollas and an asymmetric Androecium with a pollen catapult mechanism, relatively long unequal filaments, and relatively large anthers; and P. robusta Hammel & C. M. Taylor of lowland Nicaragua and Costa Rica has leathery leaves, relatively long corollas with unequal lobes, subglobose leathery fruits, and a symmetric Androecium that apparently lacks the pollen catapult mechanism.