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Anhedonia

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Hermioni L Amonoo – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • does desire to pursue pleasurable activities matter the impact of pretransplantation Anhedonia on quality of life and fatigue in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hermioni L Amonoo, Alyssa L Fenech, Joseph A Greer, Jennifer S Temel, Jeff C Huffman, Areej Eljawahri

    Abstract:

    Anhedonia, the loss of the capacity to experience pleasure, is subjectively and biologically distinct from depressed mood. Few studies have specifically examined the association of pretransplantation Anhedonia with key functional outcomes (eg, health-related quality of life [QOL]) in patients with hematologic malignancies who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Among 248 HSCT recipients enrolled in 2 intervention trials, we examined the associations between pretransplantation Anhedonia and both QOL and fatigue at 2 weeks and 6 months post-transplantation. Across time points, patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale, which we used to measure depressive symptoms, QOL and fatigue, respectively. Pretransplantation Anhedonia was assessed using the corresponding item in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscales were used to measure QOL and fatigue. Associations between pretransplantation Anhedonia and outcomes were assessed using regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, transplant type, and intervention group. Ninety-eight patients (39.5%) reported pretransplantation Anhedonia, of whom 60 (61%) did not meet the criteria for elevated depressive symptoms. Pretransplantation Anhedonia was negatively associated with QOL at 2 weeks (B = -17.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], -23.05 to -11.30; P < .001) and at 6 months (B = -15.10; 95% CI, -21.51 to -8.69; P< .001). Pretransplantation Anhedonia was also negatively associated with fatigue (2 weeks: B = -9.35; 95% CI, -12.47 to -6.22; P< .001; 6 months: B = -5.68; 95% CI, -9.07 to -2.28; P= .001). The association between pretransplantation Anhedonia and QOL and fatigue remained significant after adjusting for depression scores. Pretransplantation Anhedonia is negatively and significantly associated with QOL and fatigue in HSCT recipients. These findings underscore the need to incorporate Anhedonia assessment in the evaluation and management of psychological distress in these patients.

  • does desire to pursue pleasurable activities matter the impact of pre transplant Anhedonia on quality of life and fatigue in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hermioni L Amonoo, Alyssa L Fenech, Joseph A Greer, Jennifer S Temel, Jeff C Huffman, Areej Eljawahri

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Anhedonia, the loss of the capacity to experience pleasure, is subjectively and biologically distinct from depressed mood. Few studies have specifically examined the association of pre-transplant Anhedonia with key functional outcomes (e.g., health-related quality of life; QOL) in patients with hematologic malignancies who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). METHODS: Among 248 HSCT patients enrolled in two intervention trials, we examined the associations between pre-transplant Anhedonia and both QOL and fatigue at 2 weeks and 6 months post-transplant. Across time points, patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale, which we used to measure depressive symptoms, QOL and fatigue, respectively. Pre-transplant Anhedonia was assessed via the corresponding item in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale were used to measure QOL and fatigue. Associations between pre-transplant Anhedonia and outcomes were assessed via regression analyses adjusting for age, gender, transplant type, and intervention group. RESULTS: 39.5% (n=98) of patients reported pre-transplant Anhedonia. Of the patients who reported pre-transplant Anhedonia, 61% (n=60) did not meet criteria for elevated depressive symptoms. Pre-transplant Anhedonia was negatively associated with QOL at 2 weeks (B=-17.21; 95% CI, -23.05 to -11.30; p<.001) and at 6 months (B=-15.10; 95% CI, -21.51 to -8.69; p<.001). Pre-transplant Anhedonia was also negatively associated with fatigue (2 weeks: B=-9.35; 95% CI, -12.47 to -6.22; p<.001; 6 months: B=-5.68; 95% CI, -9.07 to -2.28; p=.001). The association between pre-transplant Anhedonia and QOL and fatigue remained significant after adjusting for depression scores. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-transplant Anhedonia is negatively and significantly associated with QOL and fatigue in HSCT patients. These findings underscore the need to incorporate Anhedonia assessment in the evaluation and management of psychological distress in HSCT patients.

Athina Markou – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Enduring deficits in brain reward function after chronic social defeat in rats: Susceptibility, resilience, and antidepressant response
    Biological Psychiatry, 2014
    Co-Authors: Andre Der-avakian, Michelle S. Mazei-robison, James P. Kesby, Eric J. Nestler, Athina Markou

    Abstract:

    Background: Anhedonia, or diminished interest or pleasure in rewarding activities, characterizes depression and reflects deficits in brain reward circuitries. Social stress induces Anhedonia and increases risk of depression, although the effect of social stress on brain reward function is incompletely understood. Methods: This study assessed the following: 1) brain reward function in rats (using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure) and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and related signaling molecules in response to chronic social defeat, 2) brain reward function during social defeat and long-term treatment with the antidepressants fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) and desipramine (10 mg/kg/ day), and 3) forced swim test behavior after social defeat and fluoxetine treatment. Results: Social defeat profoundly and persistently decreased brain reward function, reflecting an enduring anhedonic response, in susceptible rats, whereas resilient rats showed no long-term brain reward deficits. In the ventral tegmental area, social defeat, regardless of susceptibility or resilience, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased phosphorylated AKT, whereas only susceptibility was associated with increased phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin. Fluoxetine and desipramine reversed lower, but not higher, stress-induced brain reward deficits in susceptible rats. Fluoxetine decreased immobility in the forced swim test, as did social defeat. Conclusions: These results suggest that the differential persistent anhedonic response to psychosocial stress may be mediated by ventral tegmental area signaling molecules independent of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and indicate that greater stress-induced Anhedonia is associated with resistance to antidepressant treatment. Consideration of these behavioral and neurobiological factors associated with resistance to stress and antidepressant action may promote the discovery of novel targets to treat stress-related mood disorders.

  • Neural substrates of psychostimulant withdrawal-induced Anhedonia.
    Current topics in behavioral neurosciences, 2009
    Co-Authors: Manoranjan S. D’souza, Athina Markou

    Abstract:

    Psychostimulant drugs have powerful reinforcing and hedonic properties and are frequently abused. Cessation of psychostimulant administration results in a withdrawal syndrome characterized by Anhedonia (i.e., an inability to experience pleasure). In humans, psychostimulant withdrawal-induced Anhedonia can be debilitating and has been hypothesized to play an important role in relapse to drug use. Hence, understanding the neural substrates involved in psychostimulant withdrawal-induced Anhedonia is essential. In this review, we first summarize the theoretical perspectives of psychostimulant withdrawal-induced Anhedonia. Experimental procedures and measures used to assess Anhedonia in experimental animals are also discussed. The review then focuses on neural substrates hypothesized to play an important role in Anhedonia experienced after termination of psychostimulant administration, such as with cocaine, amphetamine-like drugs, and nicotine. Both neural substrates that have been extensively investigated and some that need further evaluation with respect to psychostimulant withdrawal-induced Anhedonia are reviewed. In the context of reviewing the various neurosubstrates of psychostimulant withdrawal, we also discuss pharmacological medications that have been used to treat psychostimulant withdrawal in humans. This literature review indicates that great progress has been made in understanding the neural substrates of Anhedonia associated with psychostimulant withdrawal. These advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of Anhedonia may also shed light on the neurobiology of nondrug-induced Anhedonia, such as that seen as a core symptom of depression and a negative symptom of schizophrenia.

  • Animal models and treatments for addiction and depression co-morbidity
    Neurotoxicity Research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Neil E. Paterson, Athina Markou

    Abstract:

    The high rates of co-morbidity of drug addiction with depression may be attributable to shared neurobiology. Here, we discuss shared neurobiological substrates in drug withdrawal and depression, with an emphasis on changes in brain reward circuitry that may underlie Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression and drug withdrawal. We explored experimentally whether clinical antidepressant medications or other treatments would reverse the Anhedonia observed in rats undergoing spontaneous nicotine or amphetamine withdrawal, defined operationally as elevated brain reward thresholds. The co-administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with a serotonin-1A receptor antagonist, or the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine, or the atypical antidepressant bupropion ameliorated nicotine or amphetamine withdrawal in rats. Thus, increases in monoaminergic neurotransmission, or neuroadaptations induced by increased monoaminergic neurotransmission, ameliorated depression-like aspects of drug withdrawal. Further, chronic pretreatment with the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, that has some efficacy in the treatment of the depression-like symptoms of schizophrenia, attenuated nicotine and amphetamine withdrawal. Finally, a metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonist reversed threshold elevations associated with nicotine withdrawal. The effects of these pharmacological manipulations are consistent with the altered neurobiology observed in drug withdrawal and depression. Thus, these data support the hypothesis of common substrates mediating the depressive symptoms of drug withdrawal and those seen in psychiatric patients. Accordingly, the anhedonic state associated with drug withdrawal can be used to study the neurobiology of Anhedonia, and thus contribute to the identification of novel targets for the treatment of depression-like symptoms seen in various psychiatric and neurological disorders.

Areej Eljawahri – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • does desire to pursue pleasurable activities matter the impact of pretransplantation Anhedonia on quality of life and fatigue in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hermioni L Amonoo, Alyssa L Fenech, Joseph A Greer, Jennifer S Temel, Jeff C Huffman, Areej Eljawahri

    Abstract:

    Anhedonia, the loss of the capacity to experience pleasure, is subjectively and biologically distinct from depressed mood. Few studies have specifically examined the association of pretransplantation Anhedonia with key functional outcomes (eg, health-related quality of life [QOL]) in patients with hematologic malignancies who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Among 248 HSCT recipients enrolled in 2 intervention trials, we examined the associations between pretransplantation Anhedonia and both QOL and fatigue at 2 weeks and 6 months post-transplantation. Across time points, patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale, which we used to measure depressive symptoms, QOL and fatigue, respectively. Pretransplantation Anhedonia was assessed using the corresponding item in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscales were used to measure QOL and fatigue. Associations between pretransplantation Anhedonia and outcomes were assessed using regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, transplant type, and intervention group. Ninety-eight patients (39.5%) reported pretransplantation Anhedonia, of whom 60 (61%) did not meet the criteria for elevated depressive symptoms. Pretransplantation Anhedonia was negatively associated with QOL at 2 weeks (B = -17.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], -23.05 to -11.30; P < .001) and at 6 months (B = -15.10; 95% CI, -21.51 to -8.69; P< .001). Pretransplantation Anhedonia was also negatively associated with fatigue (2 weeks: B = -9.35; 95% CI, -12.47 to -6.22; P< .001; 6 months: B = -5.68; 95% CI, -9.07 to -2.28; P= .001). The association between pretransplantation Anhedonia and QOL and fatigue remained significant after adjusting for depression scores. Pretransplantation Anhedonia is negatively and significantly associated with QOL and fatigue in HSCT recipients. These findings underscore the need to incorporate Anhedonia assessment in the evaluation and management of psychological distress in these patients.

  • does desire to pursue pleasurable activities matter the impact of pre transplant Anhedonia on quality of life and fatigue in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hermioni L Amonoo, Alyssa L Fenech, Joseph A Greer, Jennifer S Temel, Jeff C Huffman, Areej Eljawahri

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Anhedonia, the loss of the capacity to experience pleasure, is subjectively and biologically distinct from depressed mood. Few studies have specifically examined the association of pre-transplant Anhedonia with key functional outcomes (e.g., health-related quality of life; QOL) in patients with hematologic malignancies who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). METHODS: Among 248 HSCT patients enrolled in two intervention trials, we examined the associations between pre-transplant Anhedonia and both QOL and fatigue at 2 weeks and 6 months post-transplant. Across time points, patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale, which we used to measure depressive symptoms, QOL and fatigue, respectively. Pre-transplant Anhedonia was assessed via the corresponding item in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue subscale were used to measure QOL and fatigue. Associations between pre-transplant Anhedonia and outcomes were assessed via regression analyses adjusting for age, gender, transplant type, and intervention group. RESULTS: 39.5% (n=98) of patients reported pre-transplant Anhedonia. Of the patients who reported pre-transplant Anhedonia, 61% (n=60) did not meet criteria for elevated depressive symptoms. Pre-transplant Anhedonia was negatively associated with QOL at 2 weeks (B=-17.21; 95% CI, -23.05 to -11.30; p<.001) and at 6 months (B=-15.10; 95% CI, -21.51 to -8.69; p<.001). Pre-transplant Anhedonia was also negatively associated with fatigue (2 weeks: B=-9.35; 95% CI, -12.47 to -6.22; p<.001; 6 months: B=-5.68; 95% CI, -9.07 to -2.28; p=.001). The association between pre-transplant Anhedonia and QOL and fatigue remained significant after adjusting for depression scores. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-transplant Anhedonia is negatively and significantly associated with QOL and fatigue in HSCT patients. These findings underscore the need to incorporate Anhedonia assessment in the evaluation and management of psychological distress in HSCT patients.