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Walter Goessler – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Arsenocholine o sulfate a novel compound as major arsenic species in the parasitic mushroom tolypocladium ophioglossoides
    Chemosphere, 2020
    Co-Authors: Simone Braeuer, Jan Borovicka, Ronald A Glabonjat, Lorenz Steiner, Walter Goessler

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The As concentrations, along with 34 other elements, and the As speciation were investigated in wild-grown samples of the parasitic mushroom Tolypocladium ophioglossoides with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ICPMS. The As concentrations were 0.13 – 3.44 mg kg-1 dry mass. More remarkable was the As speciation, where up to 56 % of the extracted As were found to be an unknown As species, which was marginally retained under anion- and also cation-exchange conditions. After testing several different chromatographic settings, the compound was finally isolated and identified as 2-(sulfoxyethyl) trimethylarsonium ion (in short: Arsenocholine-O-sulfate) with high resolution mass spectrometry. The compound was synthesized and further quantified in all investigated samples via ion-pair chromatography coupled to ICPMS. In addition to the high abundance of Arsenocholine-O-sulfate in T. ophioglossoides, small amounts of this As species were also detected in one sample of the host mushroom, Elaphomyces asperulus. In a sample of another parasitic mushroom, Ophiocordyceps sinensis, Arsenocholine-O-sulfate could not be detected, but the main species was another unknown compound that was oxidized to inorganic As(V) with hydrogen peroxide. This is the first discovery of Arsenocholine-O-sulfate in nature. It is possible that it is present in many other organisms, at least in low concentrations, and just has not been detected there yet because of its unusual chromatographic behavior. The existence of Arsenocholine-O-sulfate brings up questions again about the biotransformation pathways of As in the environment and the specific behavior of fungi.

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  • homoArsenocholine a novel arsenic compound detected for the first time in nature
    Talanta, 2018
    Co-Authors: Simone Braeuer, Jan Borovicka, Toma N Glasnov, Gema Guedes De La Cruz, Kenneth B Jensen, Walter Goessler

    Abstract:

    Abstract The arsenic speciation was determined in macrofungi of the Ramaria genus with HPLC coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Besides arsenic species that are already known for macrofungi, like arsenobetaine or Arsenocholine, two compounds that were only known from marine samples so far (trimethylarsoniopropanate and dimethylarsinoylacetate) were found for the first time in a terrestrial sample. An unknown arsenical was isolated and identified as homoArsenocholine. This could be a key intermediate for further elucidation of the biotransformation mechanisms of arsenic.

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  • HomoArsenocholine – A novel arsenic compound detected for the first time in nature
    Talanta, 2018
    Co-Authors: Simone Braeuer, Jan Borovicka, Toma N Glasnov, Gema Guedes De La Cruz, Kenneth B Jensen, Walter Goessler

    Abstract:

    Abstract The arsenic speciation was determined in macrofungi of the Ramaria genus with HPLC coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Besides arsenic species that are already known for macrofungi, like arsenobetaine or Arsenocholine, two compounds that were only known from marine samples so far (trimethylarsoniopropanate and dimethylarsinoylacetate) were found for the first time in a terrestrial sample. An unknown arsenical was isolated and identified as homoArsenocholine. This could be a key intermediate for further elucidation of the biotransformation mechanisms of arsenic.

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Kevin A. Francesconi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the marine polychaete arenicola marina its unusual arsenic compound pattern and its uptake of arsenate from seawater
    Marine Environmental Research, 2002
    Co-Authors: Anita Geiszinger, Walter Goessler, Kevin A. Francesconi

    Abstract:

    Abstract Arsenic compounds in the marine polychaete Arenicola marina collected from Odense Fjord, Denmark were determined by HPLC–ICPMS. In contrast to most other marine animals, A. marina contained most of its water soluble arsenic as inorganic forms, arsenite (58%) and arsenate (16%), and arsenobetaine was present as a minor constituent (6%) only. Other arsenic compounds detected in A. marina were dimethylarsinate (4%), two arsenosugars (1 and 3%), tetramethylarsonium ion (1.5%), and Arsenocholine (

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  • Dimethylarsinoylacetate from microbial demethylation of arsenobetaine in seawater
    Applied Organometallic Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Somkiat Khokiattiwong, Walter Goessler, Søren N. Pedersen, Raymond Pickett Cox, Kevin A. Francesconi

    Abstract:

    The fate of 11 arsenic compounds in microbially enriched seawater was monitored for up to 10 days by HPLC–ICPMS. Most of the arsenicals underwent little or no change in this medium, whereas two of the compounds, arsenobetaine and Arsenocholine, were completely degraded. Arsenobetaine (Me3As+CH2COO−), the predominant form of arsenic in marine animals, was transformed within hours, initially to dimethylarsinoylacetate (Me2As(O)CH2COO−) and then to dimethylarsinate (Me2As(O)O−). Arsenocholine behaved similarly but degraded at a slower rate. The identity of the new metabolite, dimethylarsinoylacetate, was confirmed by LC electrospray MS. A repeat experiment with arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinoylacetate, and employing LC electrospray MS to monitor the metabolites, produced results qualitatively identical with those from the first experiment. The rapidity of the degradation processes offers an explanation for the apparent absence of arsenobetaine in natural waters. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • A novel arsenic containing riboside (arsenosugar) in three species of gastropod
    Science of The Total Environment, 1998
    Co-Authors: Kevin A. Francesconi, Walter Goessler, Suwanna Panutrakul, Kurt J. Irgolic

    Abstract:

    Abstract Arsenic compounds in three marine gastropods ( Thais bitubercularis, Thais distinguenda, Morula musiva ) from Phuket, Thailand were examined by HPLC using ICP-MS as an arsenic specific detector. Aqueous methanol treatment of the freeze-dried samples (initially 112–339 μg As g −1 dry mass) extracted >96% of the total arsenic. HPLC-ICP-MS of the extracts demonstrated the presence of arsenobetaine (93–95% of total extractable arsenic), Arsenocholine (3.1–4.6%), tetramethylarsonium ion (0.21–2.2%), two unknown arsenic compounds (each approx. 0.1%), and an unresolved mixture of arsenic compounds (∼1%). One of the unknowns was identified as a new natural product, the arsenosugar 2′,3′-dihydroxypropyl 5-deoxy-5-trimethylarsonioriboside, by co-chromatography with synthetic material. The presence of these arsenic compounds in the gastropods is consistent with the hypothesis that trimethylated arsenosugars are transformed into arsenobetaine via Arsenocholine within animals.

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Toshikazu Kaise – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Occurrence of organo-arsenicals in jellyfishes and their mucus
    Chemosphere, 2001
    Co-Authors: Ken'ichi Hanaoka, Walter Goessler, Toshikazu Kaise, Doris Kuehnelt, Claudia Schlagenhaufen, Shunshiro Ueno, Hirokazu Ohno, Namiko Wada, Kurt J. Irgolic

    Abstract:

    Water-soluble arsenic compound fractions were extracted from seven species of jellyfishes and subjected to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for arsenicals. A low content of arsenic was found to be the characteristic of jellyfish. Arsenobetaine (AB) was the major arsenic compound without exception in the tissues of the jellyfish species and mucus-blobs collected from some of them. Although the arsenic content in Beroe cucumis, which preys on Bolinopsis mikado, was more than 13 times that in B. mikado, the chromatograms of these two species were similar in the distribution pattern of arsenicals. The nine species of jellyfishes including two species treated in the previous paper can be classified into Arsenocholine (AC)-rich and AC-poor species. Jellyfishes belonging to Semaostamae were classified as AC-rich species.

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  • Water‐soluble arsenic residues from several arsenolipids occurring in the tissues of the starspotted shark Musterus manazo
    Applied Organometallic Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Ken'ichi Hanaoka, Yuichi Tanaka, Yukari Nagata, Kenta Yoshida, Toshikazu Kaise

    Abstract:

    Alkali-labile and alkali-stable arsenolipid fractions were prepared from 12 tissues of the starspotted shark Musterus manazo and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled mass spectrometry. At least six arsenolipids were found in the shark. Two major alkali-labile arsenolipids (a dimethylated arsenic-containing lipid and an Arsenocholine-containing lipid) were shown in ordinary muscle, dark muscle, heart, bone, skin and stomach, whereas a single major arsenolipid, the dimethylated arsenic-containing lipid, was shown in the intestine, liver, kidney, spleen and brain. Besides these lipids, four other minor alkali-labile arsenolipids were present. On the other hand, as for the alkali-stable arsenolipids, a dimethylated arsenic-containing lipid and an Arsenocholine-containing lipid were also found in dark muscle, skin, stomach and intestine, whereas only dimethylated arsenic-containing lipid was found in the liver.

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  • Arsenocholine– and dimethylated arsenic- containing lipids in starspotted shark Mustelus manazo
    Applied Organometallic Chemistry, 1999
    Co-Authors: Ken'ichi Hanaoka, Walter Goessler, Toshikazu Kaise, Kenta Yoshida, Yuka Fujitaka, Kurt J. Irgolic

    Abstract:

    We have investigated lipid-soluble arsenic compounds present in the tissues of a demersal shark, the starspotted shark Mustelus manazo. Arsenic compounds were extracted with chloroform–methanol from several tissues taken from each of five individuals, subjected to mild alkaline hydrolysis and fractionated into alkali-labile and alkali-stable fractions. Ordinary muscle, kidney and brain contained alkali-labile arsenic compounds; liver, stomach, heart and gall bladder contained alkali-stable compounds; and intestine, skin, dark muscle, spleen and bone contained both types of arsenic compounds. After further hydrolysis, the hydrolysates from ordinary muscle and liver were chromatographed with HPLC–ICP–MS. Arsenocholine was detected in the hydrolysates from the muscle, suggesting that arsenolecithins were present in the tissues. However, dimethyl-­arsinic acid was detected in the hydrolysates from the liver, suggesting the presence of di-­methylated arsenolipid in it. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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