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Autonomic Regulation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 7704 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Carey D Balaban – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Vestibular Autonomic Regulation (including motion sickness and the mechanism of vomiting).
    Current Opinion in Neurology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carey D Balaban

    Abstract:

    Autonomic manifestations of vestibular dysfunction and motion sickness are well established in the clinical literature. Recent studies of ‚vestibular Autonomic Regulation‚ have focused predominantly on Autonomic responses to stimulation of the vestibular sense organs in the inner ear. These studies

  • Vestibular Autonomic Regulation (including motion sickness and the mechanism of vomiting)
    Current Opinion in Neurology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Carey D Balaban

    Abstract:

    Autonomic manifestations of vestibular dysfunction and motion sickness are well established in the clinical literature. Recent studies of ‘vestibular Autonomic Regulation‘ have focused predominantly on Autonomic responses to stimulation of the vestibular sense organs in the inner ear. These studies have shown that Autonomic responses to vestibular stimulation are regionally selective and have defined a ‘vestibulosympathetic reflex’ in animal experiments. Outside the realm of experimental preparations, however, the importance of vestibular inputs in Autonomic Regulation is unclear because controls for secondary factors, such as affective/emotional responses and cardiovascular responses elicited by muscle contraction and regional blood pooling, have been inadequate. Anatomic and physiologic evidence of an extensive convergence of vestibular and Autonomic information in the brainstem suggests though that there may be an integrated representation of gravitoinertial acceleration from vestibular, somatic, and visceral receptors for somatic and visceral motor control. In the case of vestibular dysfunction or motion sickness, the unpleasant visceral manifestations (e.g. epigastric discomfort, nausea or vomiting) may contribute to conditioned situational avoidance and the development of agoraphobia.

Andreas Voss – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Quantification of Autonomic Regulation in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.
    Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 2013
    Co-Authors: Steffen Schulz, Julia Ritter, Katrin Oertel, Katharina Witt, Orlando Guntinas-lichius, Andreas Voss

    Abstract:

    Abstract Previous studies have proposed varying causes for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), including vascular occlusion, ruptured inner ear membrane, acoustic tumours and circulatory disturbances in the inner ear. The objective of this study was to characterise the Autonomic Regulation in 19 SSNHL patients in comparison to 19 healthy age-gender matched normal-hearing control subjects (CON) in order to improve the diagnostics of vascular caused hearing loss in SSNHL patients. A high-resolution short-term electrocardiogram (ECG) and the continuous noninvasive blood pressure signal were simultaneously recorded under resting conditions (30 min). Linear and nonlinear indices of heart rate- and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) were calculated to characterise Autonomic Regulation. The results showed that HRV analysis did not produce significantly different results between SSNHL and CON, whereas linear and nonlinear BPV indices showed significant differences between both groups (p  This study was the first to show an altered cardiovascular Regulation in SSNHL patients when compared to CON subjects, based on continuous blood pressure analysis. This was characterised by reduced variability, complexity and dynamics of blood pressure time series in SSNHL. These findings may contribute to an improved classification of the controversially discussed causes of SSNHL and, in addition, may lead to improved diagnostic strategies for a subgroup of SSNHL patients whose hearing loss is caused by cardiovascular factors.

  • Quantification of Autonomic Regulation in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.
    Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical, 2013
    Co-Authors: Steffen Schulz, Julia Ritter, Katrin Oertel, Katharina Witt, Orlando Guntinas-lichius, Andreas Voss

    Abstract:

    Previous studies have proposed varying causes for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), including vascular occlusion, ruptured inner ear membrane, acoustic tumours and circulatory disturbances in the inner ear. The objective of this study was to characterise the Autonomic Regulation in 19 SSNHL patients in comparison to 19 healthy age-gender matched normal-hearing control subjects (CON) in order to improve the diagnostics of vascular caused hearing loss in SSNHL patients. A high-resolution short-term electrocardiogram (ECG) and the continuous noninvasive blood pressure signal were simultaneously recorded under resting conditions (30min). Linear and nonlinear indices of heart rate- and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) were calculated to characterise Autonomic Regulation. The results showed that HRV analysis did not produce significantly different results between SSNHL and CON, whereas linear and nonlinear BPV indices showed significant differences between both groups (p

  • Prediction of atrial fibrillation recurrence after cardioversion-interaction analysis of cardiac Autonomic Regulation.
    Medical Engineering & Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Andrea Seeck, Wilma Rademacher, C. Fischer, Jens Haueisen, Ralf Surber, Andreas Voss

    Abstract:

    Abstract Today atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice accounting for approximately one third of hospitalizations and accompanied with a 5 fold increased risk for ischemic stroke and a 1.5 fold increased mortality risk. The role of the cardiac Regulation system in AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion (CV) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the Autonomic Regulation by analyzing the interaction between heart rate and blood pressure using novel methods of nonlinear interaction dynamics, namely joint symbolic dynamics (JSD) and segmented Poincare plot analysis (SPPA). For the first time, we applied SPPA to analyze the interaction between two time series. Introducing a parameter set of two indices, one derived from JSD and one from SPPA, the linear discriminant function analysis revealed an overall accuracy of 89% (sensitivity 91.7%, specificity 86.7%) for the classification between patients with stable sinus rhythm (group SR, n =15) and with AF recurrence (group REZ, n =12). This study proves that the assessment of the Autonomic Regulation by analyzing the coupling of heart rate and systolic blood pressure provides a potential tool for the prediction of AF recurrence after CV and could aid in the adjustment of therapeutic options for patients with AF.

Atsuhiko Iijima – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • GCCE – A multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model for interpreting visually induced motion sickness
    2014 IEEE 3rd Global Conference on Consumer Electronics (GCCE), 2014
    Co-Authors: Tohru Kiryu, Atsuhiko Iijima

    Abstract:

    For interpreting the emerging process of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), we propose a multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model that consists of trigger and accumulation effects with different timescales. As validation experiments, fifteen participants viewed a 2-min-long first-person-view video section five times (total 10-min) continuously. Measured biosignals were the RR interval, respiration, and blood pressure time-series to estimate the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power components and the LF/HF ratio. Then, we determined the trigger points and the sections that produced some sensation. The results showed that VIMS is first induced by specific trigger factors and increases depending on individual differences in Autonomic Regulation. The multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model, which has independent coordinates for presence and VIMS and represents the short- and long-term effects, seems preferable for interpreting VIMS.

  • A multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model for interpreting visually induced motion sickness
    2014 IEEE 3rd Global Conference on Consumer Electronics (GCCE), 2014
    Co-Authors: Tohru Kiryu, Atsuhiko Iijima

    Abstract:

    For interpreting the emerging process of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), we propose a multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model that consists of trigger and accumulation effects with different timescales. As validation experiments, fifteen participants viewed a 2-min-long first-person-view video section five times (total 10-min) continuously. Measured biosignals were the RR interval, respiration, and blood pressure time-series to estimate the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power components and the LF/HF ratio. Then, we determined the trigger points and the sections that produced some sensation. The results showed that VIMS is first induced by specific trigger factors and increases depending on individual differences in Autonomic Regulation. The multi-timescale Autonomic Regulation model, which has independent coordinates for presence and VIMS and represents the short- and long-term effects, seems preferable for interpreting VIMS.