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Bentazone

The Experts below are selected from a list of 324 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Branka B Petkovic – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • boron doped diamond electrode a prestigious unmodified carbon electrode for simple and fast determination of Bentazone in river water samples
    Diamond and Related Materials, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sonja Jevtic, Anđela Stefanovic, Dalibor M Stankovic, Marija V Pergal, Aleksandra T Ivanovic, Anja Jokic, Branka B Petkovic

    Abstract:

    Abstract Bentazone (BZ) is selective contact-past herbicide with suspected reproductive toxicity potential for human due to possible contamination of ground and surface waters. This work presents simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate determination of Bentazone at unmodified boron-doped diamond electrode, using differential pulse voltammetry in Britton-Robinson buffer (pH 4, oxidation peak at 1.0 V). Under optimized DPV conditions linear calibration curve was obtained for range of 2 to 100 μM, with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. The effect of possible interfering agents is negligible, confirming good selectivity of the method. The method was successfully applied to determination of Bentazone in spiked river water samples. This electrochemical determination of Bentazone represents a favorable alternative to other used time-consuming and expensive analytical techniques and procedures.

Hansjorgen Albrechtsen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • importance of methane oxidation for microbial degradation of the herbicide Bentazone in drinking water production
    Frontiers in Environmental Science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Mathilde Jorgensen Hedegaard, Manuela Anna Maria Schliemannhaug, Nikola Milanovic, Rasmus Boehansen, Hansjorgen Albrechtsen

    Abstract:

    Bentazone is a herbicide, which is frequently detected in groundwater due to its mobility and persistence in aquifers. Groundwater is used as a drinking water source all over the world, and sustainable methods to remove pesticides at low concentrations are urgently needed since pesticide contaminations can adversely affect human health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether microbial Bentazone degradation was associated with methane oxidation in full-scale drinking water treatment plants. To this end, we investigated Bentazone biodegradation in microcosms with water and filter material from rapid sand filters, or biomass from aeration systems, and we investigated the statistical relation between the presence of methane and Bentazone in groundwater abstraction wells. An array of evidence supported an association between Bentazone degradation and methane oxidation in the biological treatment process. The biodegradation potential of Bentazone was associated with the presence of methane in the raw water at 14 different water works. In contrast, no association was observed with any of the other investigated inorganic energy sources, e.g. ammonium. Addition of acetylene inhibited methane oxidation and the Bentazone degradation in filter material from two investigated waterworks. Biomass from the aeration tanks degraded Bentazone, but only while oxidizing methane. Bentazone removal rates and methane removal rates correlated significantly across all the experiments with biomass or filter material, with an overall transformation yield of 15×10-5 moleBTZ/moleCH4. This demonstrated that the Bentazone degradation was conducted by the same type of process in all the investigated communities, governed by methane oxidation. Furthermore, based on more than 10.000 water analyses from waterworks abstraction wells in Denmark, Bentazone was detected significantly less frequent in wells with high methane concentrations (> 1 mg/L) than in wells without methane. This suggests that biological treatment of Bentazone contamination in drinking water may be achieved using methanotrophs.

  • Microbial degradation pathways of the herbicide Bentazone in filter sand used for drinking water treatment
    Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mathilde Jorgensen Hedegaard, Carsten Prasse, Hansjorgen Albrechtsen

    Abstract:

    The herbicide Bentazone is used extensively worldwide, and it is frequently detected in groundwater sources used for drinking water production. Previously, Bentazone has been shown to be biodegraded in filter sand from biological rapid sand filters at various waterworks. This untapped potential could be an inexpensive and sustainable alternative for the removal of trace organic contaminants. To study the fate of Bentazone in sand filters and to identify associated risks, degradation pathways in filter sand were identified and the toxicity of identified transformation products was evaluated using quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modelling. Bentazone degradation was investigated in microcosm experiments with filter sand, effluent water and Bentazone at elevated (5 mg L−1) and environmentally relevant concentrations (

  • microbial degradation pathways of the herbicide Bentazone in filter sand used for drinking water treatment
    Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mathilde Jorgensen Hedegaard, Carsten Prasse, Hansjorgen Albrechtsen

    Abstract:

    The herbicide Bentazone is used extensively worldwide, and it is frequently detected in groundwater sources used for drinking water production. Previously, Bentazone has been shown to be biodegraded in filter sand from biological rapid sand filters at various waterworks. This untapped potential could be an inexpensive and sustainable alternative for the removal of trace organic contaminants. To study the fate of Bentazone in sand filters and to identify associated risks, degradation pathways in filter sand were identified and the toxicity of identified transformation products was evaluated using quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modelling. Bentazone degradation was investigated in microcosm experiments with filter sand, effluent water and Bentazone at elevated (5 mg L−1) and environmentally relevant concentrations (<10 μg L−1). The investigations at elevated concentrations revealed up to 10 transformation products, suggesting three main biotransformation pathways: 1) oxidation of the isopropyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid, 2) oxidation of the aromatic ring leading to ring cleavage and subsequent decarboxylation reactions, and 3) N-methylation followed by oxidation to a carboxylic acid. At environmentally relevant concentrations, 92% of the initial Bentazone was removed within 13 days, and at this point only one transformation product, carboxy-Bentazone, could be detected in the water. QSAR-models considering both human and environmentally relevant endpoints showed that degradation in filter sand led to a detoxification of Bentazone. Initial oxidation processes followed by further degradation, and partial mineralization highlights the relevance of both methanotrophs and heterotrophs for the Bentazone degradation in rapid sand filters.

Francois Beguin – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • electrochemical regeneration of activated carbon cloth exhausted with Bentazone
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Conchi O Ania, Francois Beguin

    Abstract:

    : The electrochemical regeneration of an activated carbon cloth exhausted with a common herbicide (Bentazone) was investigated under different operating conditions. The reversibility of the desorption process was confirmed by monitoring the UV spectra of the solution while cathodic polarization is being applied. Neither nanotextural nor chemical changes are produced in the carbon cloth upon polarization in the absence of the adsorbate. Upon cathodic polarization of a carbon cloth working electrode preloaded with Bentazone, negative charges appear on the surface. A partial Bentazone desorption results from repulsive electrostatic interactions between the negative charges on the carbon cloth and Bentazone. When the electrode potential is below the thermodynamic value for cathodic decomposition of water, hydroxyl ions are liberated. Such ions provoke local pH changes that are responsible of the dissociation of Bentazone and carbon surface groups to their anionic form. As a consequence of the pH increase, an almost reversible desorption of Bentazone is observed. The effects of several operating parameters on the regeneration efficiency were evaluated. Higher regeneration efficiencies were attained under potentiostatic as compared to galvanostatic conditions, as OH- production strongly depends on the applied potential.

  • mechanism of adsorption and electrosorption of Bentazone on activated carbon cloth in aqueous solutions
    Water Research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Conchi O Ania, Francois Beguin

    Abstract:

    Abstract An electrochemical technique has been applied to enhance the removal of a common herbicide (Bentazone) from aqueous solutions using an activated carbon cloth as electrode. A pH increase from acidic to basic reduces the uptake, with capacities going from 127 down to 80 mg/g at pH 2 and 7, respectively. Increasing the oxygen content of the carbon cloth causes a decrease in the Bentazone loading capacity at all pH values. This indicates that adsorption is governed by both dispersive and electrostatic interactions, the extent of which is controlled by the solution pH and the nature of the adsorbent. Anodic polarization of the carbon cloth noticeably enhances the adsorption of Bentazone, to an extent depending on the current applied to the carbon electrode. The electrosorption is promoted by a local pH decrease provoked by anodic decomposition of water in the pores of the carbon cloth.