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Beta Microseminoprotein

The Experts below are selected from a list of 180 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Hans Lilja – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a common prostate cancer risk variant 5 of msmb Microseminoprotein Beta is a strong predictor of circulating msp Microseminoprotein in multiple populations
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kevin M Waters, Hans Lilja, Robert J. Klein, Camilla Valtonenandre, Daniel O Stram, Loic Le Marchand, Mari T Peltola, Laurence N Kolonel, Brian E Henderson, Christopher A Haiman

    Abstract:

    Background: BetaMicroseminoprotein (MSP) is one of the three most abundantly secreted proteins of the prostate, and has been suggested as a biomarker for prostate cancer risk. A common variant, rs10993994, in the 5′ region of the gene which encodes MSP (MSMB), has recently been identified as a risk factor for prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels in a sample of 500 prostate cancer-free men from four racial/ethnic populations in the Multiethnic Cohort (European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans). Generalized linear models were used to estimate the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels. Results: We observed robust associations between rs10994994 genotype and MSP levels in each racial/ethnic population (all P<10-8) with carriers of the C allele having lower geometric mean MSP levels (ng/mL) (CC/CT/TT genotypes: European Americans, 28.8/20.9/10.0; African Americans, 29.0/21.9/10.9; Latinos, 29.2/17.1/8.3; and Japanese Americans 25.8/16.4/6.7). We estimated the variant accounts for 30-50% of the variation in MSP levels in each population. We also observed significant differences in MSP levels between populations (P=3.5x10-6), with MSP levels observed to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Japanese Americans. Conclusions: Rs10993994 genotype is strongly associated with plasma MSP levels in multiple racial/ethnic populations. Impact: This supports the hypothesis that rs10993994 may be the biologically functional allele. Impact:

  • a common prostate cancer risk variant 5 of Microseminoprotein Beta msmb is a strong predictor of circulating Beta Microseminoprotein msp levels in multiple populations
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kevin M Waters, Hans Lilja, Robert J. Klein, Camilla Valtonenandre, Daniel O Stram, Loic Le Marchand, Mari T Peltola, Laurence N Kolonel, Brian E Henderson, Christopher A Haiman

    Abstract:

    Background: BetaMicroseminoprotein (MSP) is one of the three most abundantly secreted proteins of the prostate and has been suggested as a biomarker for prostate cancer risk. A common variant, rs10993994, in the 5′ region of the gene that encodes MSP (MSMB) has recently been identified as a risk factor for prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels in a sample of 500 prostate cancer-free men from four racial/ethnic populations in the Multiethnic Cohort (European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans). Generalized linear models were used to estimate the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels. Results: We observed robust associations between rs10994994 genotype and MSP levels in each racial/ethnic population (all P < 10(-8)), with carriers of the C allele having lower geometric mean MSP levels (ng/mL; CC/CT/TT genotypes: European Americans, 28.8/20.9/10.0; African Americans, 29.0/21.9/10.9; Latinos, 29.2/17.1/8.3; and Japanese Americans, 25.8/16.4/6.7). We estimated the variant accounts for 30% to 50% of the variation in MSP levels in each population. We also observed significant differences in MSP levels between populations (P = 3.5 x 10(-6)), with MSP levels observed to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Japanese Americans. Conclusions: Rs10993994 genotype is strongly associated with plasma MSP levels in multiple racial/ethnic populations. Impact: This supports the hypothesis that rs10993994 may be the biologically functional allele. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(10); 2639-46. (C) 2010 AACR. (Less)

  • polymorphisms at the Microseminoprotein Beta locus associated with physiologic variation in Beta Microseminoprotein and prostate specific antigen levels
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2010
    Co-Authors: Xing Xu, Hans Lilja, Christer Hallden, Camilla Valtonenandre, Charlotta Sävblom, Robert J. Klein

    Abstract:

    Background: rs10993994, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the genetic locus encoding β-Microseminoprotein (β-MSP), is associated with both prostate cancer risk and levels of blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker used in prostate cancer screening. Therefore, we wished to determine the association between SNPs at MSMB , the gene encoding β-MSP, and the levels of prostate-produced biomarkers β-MSP, PSA, and human kallikrein 2 (hK2) in blood and semen.

    Methods: Blood and semen from 304 healthy young Swedish men (ages 18-21) were assayed for β-MSP, PSA, and hK2. SNPs around MSMB were genotyped from matched DNA and analyzed for quantitative association with biomarker levels. Empirical P values were multiple test–corrected and the independence of each SNP’s effect was determined.

    Results: rs10993994 was significantly associated with the blood and semen levels of β-MSP (both P < 1.0 × 10−7) and PSA ( P = 0.00014 and P = 0.0019), and semen levels of hK2 ( P = 0.00027). Additional copies of the prostate cancer risk allele resulted in lower β-MSP but higher PSA levels, and singly explained 23% and 5% of the variation seen in semen β-MSP and PSA, respectively. Additional SNPs at MSMB are associated with β-MSP and PSA independently of rs10993994. Conclusions: SNPs at MSMB correlate with physiologic variation in β-MSP and PSA levels in the blood and semen of healthy young Swedish men. In particular, rs10993994 has a strong effect on β-MSP levels. Impact: Our results suggest a mechanism by which rs10993994 might predispose to prostate cancer and raise the possibility that genetic variation might need to be considered in interpreting the levels of these biomarkers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(8); 2035–42. ©2010 AACR. This article is featured in Highlights of This Issue, [p. 1887][1] [1]: /lookup/volpage/19/1887

Ake Lundwall – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rapidly evolving marmoset MSMB genes are differently expressed in the male genital tract.
    Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Ake Lundwall, P L Nayudu, Olivia Larne, Yvonne Ceder, Camilla Valtonen-andré

    Abstract:

    Background
    BetaMicroseminoprotein, an abundant component in prostatic fluid, is encoded by the potential tumor suppressor gene MSMB. Some New World monkeys carry several copies of this gene, in contrast to most mammals, including humans, which have one only. Here we have investigated the background for the species difference by analyzing the chromosomal organization and expression of MSMB in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

  • Rapidly evolving marmoset MSMB genes are differently expressed in the male genital tract
    Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Ake Lundwall, Olivia Larne, Yvonne Ceder, Penelope L Nayudu, Camilla Valtonen-andré

    Abstract:

    Background BetaMicroseminoprotein, an abundant component in prostatic fluid, is encoded by the potential tumor suppressor gene MSMB. Some New World monkeys carry several copies of this gene, in contrast to most mammals, including humans, which have one only. Here we have investigated the background for the species difference by analyzing the chromosomal organization and expression of MSMB in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Methods Genes were identified in the Callithrix jacchus genome database using bioinformatics and transcripts were analyzed by RT-PCR and quantified by real time PCR in the presence of SYBR green. Results The common marmoset has five MSMB: one processed pseudogene and four functional genes. The latter encompass homologous genomic regions of 32-35 kb, containing the genes of 12-14 kb and conserved upstream and downstream regions of 14-19 kb and 3-4 kb. One gene, MSMB1, occupies the same position on the chromosome as the single human gene. On the same chromosome, but several Mb away, is another MSMB locus situated with MSMB2, MSMB3 and MSMB4 arranged in tandem. Measurements of transcripts demonstrated that all functional genes are expressed in the male genital tract, generating very high transcript levels in the prostate. The transcript levels in seminal vesicles and testis are two and four orders of magnitude lower. A single gene, MSMB3, accounts for more than 90% of MSMB transcripts in both the prostate and the seminal vesicles, whereas in the testis around half of the transcripts originate from MSMB2. These genes display rapid evolution with a skewed distribution of mutated nucleotides; in MSMB2 they affect nucleotides encoding the N-terminal Greek key domain, whereas in MSMB3 it is the C-terminal MSMB-unique domain that is affected. Conclusion Callitrichide monkeys have four functional MSMB that are all expressed in the male genital tract, but the product from one gene, MSMB3, will predominate in seminal plasma. This gene and MSMB2, the predominating testicular gene, have accumulated mutations that affect different parts of the translation products, suggesting an ongoing molecular specialization that presumably yields functional differences in accessory sex glands and testis.

  • Beta Microseminoprotein in serum correlates with the levels in seminal plasma of young healthy males
    Journal of Andrology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Camilla Valtonenandre, Hans Lilja, Per Fernlund, Charlotta Sävblom, Aleksander Giwercman, Ake Lundwall

    Abstract:

    BetaMicroseminoprotein (MSP) is one of the most abundant proteins secreted by the prostate gland. Because MSP is also synthesized in nonreproductive organs, the establishment of a solid relationship between the levels of MSP in serum and semen is crucial for future studies connecting MSP with aging or diseases of the prostate gland. We developed a specific, competitive, europium-based immunoassay to measure MSP in serum and seminal plasma. We also produced recombinant MSP in insect cells using baculo virus and purified it to homogeneity by a novel approach with ethanol extraction and gel filtration. The median values of MSP in 205 young men were 12 mu g/L (2.5-97.5 percentile, 4.9-26 mu g/L) in serum and 0.53 g/L (2.5-97.5 percentile, 0.13-2.0 g/L) or 1.8 mg (2.5-97.5 percentile, 0.32-6.6 mg) in seminal plasma. MSP in serum showed significant correlation to MSP in seminal plasma (r =.50, P <.001). Significant correlations were also found in seminal plasma between MSP and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (r =.65, P <.001) and between MSP and Zn2+ (r =.54, P <.001). The yield of recombinant MSP in culture medium was 35 mg/L or higher, and recovery following ethanol extraction was 80%-90%. MSP in serum reflects the prostate secretion of MSP, and correlations were also found in seminal plasma between MSP and PSA and Zn2+. This suggests that MSP in serum can be used as a marker of prostate secretion, despite the contribution from extra prostatic tissues. (Less)

Camilla Valtonenandre – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • levels of Beta Microseminoprotein in blood and risk of prostate cancer in multiple populations
    Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2013
    Co-Authors: Christopher A Haiman, Camilla Valtonenandre, Kevin M Waters, Daniel O Stram, Mari T Peltola, Andrew J Vickers, Lynne R Wilkens, Katharina Braun, Kim Pettersson, Loic Le Marchand

    Abstract:

    Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States, risk factors for the disease remain largely unknown. More than 40 common low-risk genetic variants have been discovered through genome-wide association studies of prostate cancer (1–6). One such variant is a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10993994) in the 5’ region of the Microseminoprotein-β (MSMB) gene, which encodes for β-Microseminoprotein (MSP) (2,6). The risk allele (T nucleotide) for prostate cancer has been shown to be strongly associated with lower circulating MSP levels in multiple populations, with the variant accounting for as much as 50% of the variation in MSP levels in blood or seminal fluid (7,8).

    MSP is one of the most highly secreted proteins from the prostate, and circulating levels have been shown to be positively correlated (r = approximately 0.2) with both levels of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (8). In contrast with PSA, whereby risk of prostate cancer increases with higher PSA levels, MSP levels measured in serum, urine, and prostate tissue have been shown to be statistically significantly lower in men with prostate cancer and even lower in men with aggressive disease (9,10). The reproducible association of rs10993994 with prostate cancer risk and circulating MSP levels implicates MSP in the etiology of prostate cancer (11). However, a prospective study has yet to examine MSP levels as a risk factor for incident prostate cancer and as a potentially clinically informative marker for early detection.

    To determine the prospective relationship between circulating prediagnostic levels of MSP and prostate cancer risk, we measured MSP and PSA in a nested, multiethnic, case–control study of prostate cancer among men in the Multiethnic Cohort.

  • a common prostate cancer risk variant 5 of Microseminoprotein Beta msmb is a strong predictor of circulating Beta Microseminoprotein msp levels in multiple populations
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kevin M Waters, Hans Lilja, Robert J. Klein, Camilla Valtonenandre, Daniel O Stram, Loic Le Marchand, Mari T Peltola, Laurence N Kolonel, Brian E Henderson, Christopher A Haiman

    Abstract:

    Background: BetaMicroseminoprotein (MSP) is one of the three most abundantly secreted proteins of the prostate and has been suggested as a biomarker for prostate cancer risk. A common variant, rs10993994, in the 5′ region of the gene that encodes MSP (MSMB) has recently been identified as a risk factor for prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels in a sample of 500 prostate cancer-free men from four racial/ethnic populations in the Multiethnic Cohort (European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans). Generalized linear models were used to estimate the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels. Results: We observed robust associations between rs10994994 genotype and MSP levels in each racial/ethnic population (all P < 10(-8)), with carriers of the C allele having lower geometric mean MSP levels (ng/mL; CC/CT/TT genotypes: European Americans, 28.8/20.9/10.0; African Americans, 29.0/21.9/10.9; Latinos, 29.2/17.1/8.3; and Japanese Americans, 25.8/16.4/6.7). We estimated the variant accounts for 30% to 50% of the variation in MSP levels in each population. We also observed significant differences in MSP levels between populations (P = 3.5 x 10(-6)), with MSP levels observed to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Japanese Americans. Conclusions: Rs10993994 genotype is strongly associated with plasma MSP levels in multiple racial/ethnic populations. Impact: This supports the hypothesis that rs10993994 may be the biologically functional allele. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(10); 2639-46. (C) 2010 AACR. (Less)

  • a common prostate cancer risk variant 5 of msmb Microseminoprotein Beta is a strong predictor of circulating msp Microseminoprotein in multiple populations
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kevin M Waters, Hans Lilja, Robert J. Klein, Camilla Valtonenandre, Daniel O Stram, Loic Le Marchand, Mari T Peltola, Laurence N Kolonel, Brian E Henderson, Christopher A Haiman

    Abstract:

    Background: BetaMicroseminoprotein (MSP) is one of the three most abundantly secreted proteins of the prostate, and has been suggested as a biomarker for prostate cancer risk. A common variant, rs10993994, in the 5′ region of the gene which encodes MSP (MSMB), has recently been identified as a risk factor for prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels in a sample of 500 prostate cancer-free men from four racial/ethnic populations in the Multiethnic Cohort (European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans). Generalized linear models were used to estimate the association between rs10993994 genotype and MSP levels. Results: We observed robust associations between rs10994994 genotype and MSP levels in each racial/ethnic population (all P<10-8) with carriers of the C allele having lower geometric mean MSP levels (ng/mL) (CC/CT/TT genotypes: European Americans, 28.8/20.9/10.0; African Americans, 29.0/21.9/10.9; Latinos, 29.2/17.1/8.3; and Japanese Americans 25.8/16.4/6.7). We estimated the variant accounts for 30-50% of the variation in MSP levels in each population. We also observed significant differences in MSP levels between populations (P=3.5x10-6), with MSP levels observed to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Japanese Americans. Conclusions: Rs10993994 genotype is strongly associated with plasma MSP levels in multiple racial/ethnic populations. Impact: This supports the hypothesis that rs10993994 may be the biologically functional allele. Impact: