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Biomass Allocation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 10206 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Jingyun Fang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biomass Allocation in response to nitrogen and phosphorus availability insight from experimental manipulations of arabidopsis thaliana
    Frontiers in Plant Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Xiuping Li, Huiyuan Peng, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Allocation of Biomass to different organs is a fundamental aspect of plant responses and adaptations to changing environmental conditions, but how it responds to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability remains poorly addressed. Here we conducted greenhouse fertilization experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana, with five levels of N and P additions and eight repeat experiments, to ascertain the effects of N and P availability on Biomass Allocation patterns. N addition increased leaf and stem Allocation, but decreased root and fruit Allocation. P addition increased stem and fruit Allocation, but decreased root and leaf Allocation. Pooled data of the five levels of N addition relative to P addition resulted in lower scaling exponents of stem mass against leaf mass (0.983 vs. 1.226; p = 0.000), fruit mass against vegetative mass (0.875 vs. 1.028; p = 0.000), and shoot mass against root mass (1.069 vs. 1.324; p = 0.001). This suggested that N addition relative to P addition induced slower increase in stem mass with increasing leaf mass, slower increase in reproductive mass with increasing vegetative mass, and slower increase in shoot mass with increasing root mass. Further, the levels of N or P addition did not significantly affect the allometric relationships of stem mass vs. leaf mass, and fruit mass vs. vegetative mass. In contrast, increasing levels of N addition increased the scaling exponent of shoot to root mass, whereas increasing levels of P addition exerted the opposite influence on the scaling exponent. This result suggests that increasing levels of N addition promote Allocation to shoot mass, whereas the increasing levels of P addition promote Allocation to root mass. Our findings highlight that Biomass Allocation of A. thaliana exhibits a contrasting response to N and P availability, which has profound implications for forecasting the Biomass Allocation strategies in plants to human-induced nutrient enrichment.

  • drought effect on plant Biomass Allocation a meta analysis
    Ecology and Evolution, 2017
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Zhiyao Tang, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Drought is one of the abiotic stresses controlling plant function and ecological stability. In the context of climate change, drought is predicted to occur more frequently in the future. Despite numerous attempts to clarify the overall effects of drought stress on the growth and physiological processes of plants, a comprehensive evaluation on the impacts of drought stress on Biomass Allocation, especially on reproductive tissues, remains elusive. We conducted a meta-analysis by synthesizing 164 published studies to elucidate patterns of plant Biomass Allocation in relation to drought stress. Results showed that drought significantly increased the fraction of root mass but decreased that of stem, leaf, and reproductive mass. Roots of herbaceous plants were more sensitive to drought than woody plants that reduced reproductive Allocation more sharply than the former. Relative to herbaceous plants, drought had a more negative impact on leaf mass fraction of woody plants. Among the herbaceous plants, roots of annuals responded to drought stress more strongly than perennial herbs, but their reproductive Allocation was less sensitive to drought than the perennial herbs. In addition, cultivated and wild plants seemed to respond to drought stress in a similar way. Drought stress did not change the scaling exponents of the allometric relationship between different plant tissues. These findings suggest that the allometric partitioning theory, rather than the optimal partitioning theory, better explains the drought-induced changes in Biomass Allocation strategies.

  • Drought effect on plant Biomass Allocation: A meta‐analysis
    Ecology and Evolution, 2017
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Zhiyao Tang, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Drought is one of the abiotic stresses controlling plant function and ecological stability. In the context of climate change, drought is predicted to occur more frequently in the future. Despite numerous attempts to clarify the overall effects of drought stress on the growth and physiological processes of plants, a comprehensive evaluation on the impacts of drought stress on Biomass Allocation, especially on reproductive tissues, remains elusive. We conducted a meta-analysis by synthesizing 164 published studies to elucidate patterns of plant Biomass Allocation in relation to drought stress. Results showed that drought significantly increased the fraction of root mass but decreased that of stem, leaf, and reproductive mass. Roots of herbaceous plants were more sensitive to drought than woody plants that reduced reproductive Allocation more sharply than the former. Relative to herbaceous plants, drought had a more negative impact on leaf mass fraction of woody plants. Among the herbaceous plants, roots of annuals responded to drought stress more strongly than perennial herbs, but their reproductive Allocation was less sensitive to drought than the perennial herbs. In addition, cultivated and wild plants seemed to respond to drought stress in a similar way. Drought stress did not change the scaling exponents of the allometric relationship between different plant tissues. These findings suggest that the allometric partitioning theory, rather than the optimal partitioning theory, better explains the drought-induced changes in Biomass Allocation strategies.

Anwar Eziz – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biomass Allocation in response to nitrogen and phosphorus availability insight from experimental manipulations of arabidopsis thaliana
    Frontiers in Plant Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Xiuping Li, Huiyuan Peng, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Allocation of Biomass to different organs is a fundamental aspect of plant responses and adaptations to changing environmental conditions, but how it responds to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability remains poorly addressed. Here we conducted greenhouse fertilization experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana, with five levels of N and P additions and eight repeat experiments, to ascertain the effects of N and P availability on Biomass Allocation patterns. N addition increased leaf and stem Allocation, but decreased root and fruit Allocation. P addition increased stem and fruit Allocation, but decreased root and leaf Allocation. Pooled data of the five levels of N addition relative to P addition resulted in lower scaling exponents of stem mass against leaf mass (0.983 vs. 1.226; p = 0.000), fruit mass against vegetative mass (0.875 vs. 1.028; p = 0.000), and shoot mass against root mass (1.069 vs. 1.324; p = 0.001). This suggested that N addition relative to P addition induced slower increase in stem mass with increasing leaf mass, slower increase in reproductive mass with increasing vegetative mass, and slower increase in shoot mass with increasing root mass. Further, the levels of N or P addition did not significantly affect the allometric relationships of stem mass vs. leaf mass, and fruit mass vs. vegetative mass. In contrast, increasing levels of N addition increased the scaling exponent of shoot to root mass, whereas increasing levels of P addition exerted the opposite influence on the scaling exponent. This result suggests that increasing levels of N addition promote Allocation to shoot mass, whereas the increasing levels of P addition promote Allocation to root mass. Our findings highlight that Biomass Allocation of A. thaliana exhibits a contrasting response to N and P availability, which has profound implications for forecasting the Biomass Allocation strategies in plants to human-induced nutrient enrichment.

  • drought effect on plant Biomass Allocation a meta analysis
    Ecology and Evolution, 2017
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Zhiyao Tang, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Drought is one of the abiotic stresses controlling plant function and ecological stability. In the context of climate change, drought is predicted to occur more frequently in the future. Despite numerous attempts to clarify the overall effects of drought stress on the growth and physiological processes of plants, a comprehensive evaluation on the impacts of drought stress on Biomass Allocation, especially on reproductive tissues, remains elusive. We conducted a meta-analysis by synthesizing 164 published studies to elucidate patterns of plant Biomass Allocation in relation to drought stress. Results showed that drought significantly increased the fraction of root mass but decreased that of stem, leaf, and reproductive mass. Roots of herbaceous plants were more sensitive to drought than woody plants that reduced reproductive Allocation more sharply than the former. Relative to herbaceous plants, drought had a more negative impact on leaf mass fraction of woody plants. Among the herbaceous plants, roots of annuals responded to drought stress more strongly than perennial herbs, but their reproductive Allocation was less sensitive to drought than the perennial herbs. In addition, cultivated and wild plants seemed to respond to drought stress in a similar way. Drought stress did not change the scaling exponents of the allometric relationship between different plant tissues. These findings suggest that the allometric partitioning theory, rather than the optimal partitioning theory, better explains the drought-induced changes in Biomass Allocation strategies.

  • Drought effect on plant Biomass Allocation: A meta‐analysis
    Ecology and Evolution, 2017
    Co-Authors: Anwar Eziz, Di Tian, Zhiyao Tang, Jingyun Fang

    Abstract:

    Drought is one of the abiotic stresses controlling plant function and ecological stability. In the context of climate change, drought is predicted to occur more frequently in the future. Despite numerous attempts to clarify the overall effects of drought stress on the growth and physiological processes of plants, a comprehensive evaluation on the impacts of drought stress on Biomass Allocation, especially on reproductive tissues, remains elusive. We conducted a meta-analysis by synthesizing 164 published studies to elucidate patterns of plant Biomass Allocation in relation to drought stress. Results showed that drought significantly increased the fraction of root mass but decreased that of stem, leaf, and reproductive mass. Roots of herbaceous plants were more sensitive to drought than woody plants that reduced reproductive Allocation more sharply than the former. Relative to herbaceous plants, drought had a more negative impact on leaf mass fraction of woody plants. Among the herbaceous plants, roots of annuals responded to drought stress more strongly than perennial herbs, but their reproductive Allocation was less sensitive to drought than the perennial herbs. In addition, cultivated and wild plants seemed to respond to drought stress in a similar way. Drought stress did not change the scaling exponents of the allometric relationship between different plant tissues. These findings suggest that the allometric partitioning theory, rather than the optimal partitioning theory, better explains the drought-induced changes in Biomass Allocation strategies.

J S Coleman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biomass Allocation in old-field annual species grown in elevated CO2 environments: no evidence for optimal partitioning.
    Global Change Biology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Carl J. Bernacchi, J S Coleman, Fakhri A. Bazzaz, K. D.m. Mcconnaughay

    Abstract:

    Summary

    Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide supply is predicted to alter plant growth and Biomass Allocation patterns. It is not clear whether changes in Biomass Allocation reflect optimal partitioning or whether they are a direct effect of increased growth rates. Plasticity in growth and Biomass Allocation patterns was investigated at two concentrations of CO2 ([CO2]) and at limiting and nonlimiting nutrient levels for four fast- growing old-field annual species. Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown from seed in controlled growth chamber conditions at current (350 μmol mol−1, ambient) and future- predicted (700 μmol mol−1, elevated) CO2 levels. Frequent harvests were used to determine growth and Biomass Allocation responses of these plants throughout vegetative development. Under nonlimiting nutrient conditions, whole plant growth was increased greatly under elevated [CO2] for three C3 species and moderately increased for a C4 species (Amaranthus). No significant increases in whole plant growth were observed under limiting nutrient conditions. Plants grown in elevated [CO2] had lower or unchanged root:shoot ratios, contrary to what would be expected by optimal partitioning theory. These differences disappeared when allometric plots of the same data were analysed, indicating that CO2-induced differences in root:shoot Allocation were a consequence of accelerated growth and development rates. Allocation to leaf area was unaffected by atmospheric [CO2] for these species. The general lack of Biomass Allocation responses to [CO2] availability is in stark contrast with known responses of these species to light and nutrient gradients. We conclude that Biomass Allocation responses to elevated atmospheric [CO2] are not consistent with optimal partitioning predictions.

  • Biomass Allocation in plants: Ontogeny or optimality? A test along three resource gradients
    Ecology, 1999
    Co-Authors: K. D.m. Mcconnaughay, J S Coleman

    Abstract:

    We examined Biomass Allocation patterns throughout the entire vegetative growth phase for three species of annual plants along three separate gradients of resource availability to determine whether observed patterns of Allocational plasticity are consistent with optimal partitioning theory. Individuals of the annual plant species Abutilon theo- phrasti, Chenopodium album, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown from locally field- gathered seed in controlled greenhouse conditions across gradients of light, nutrients, and water. Frequent harvests were used to determine the growth and Allocation (root vs. shoot, and leaf area vs. Biomass) responses of these plants over a 57-d period. Growth analysis revealed that each species displayed significant plasticity in growth rates and substantial amounts of ontogenetic drift in root : shoot Biomass ratios and ratios of leaf area to Biomass across each of the three resource gradients. Ontogenetically controlled comparisons of root : shoot and leaf area ratios across light and nutrient gradients were generally consistent with predictions based on optimal partitioning theory; Allocation to roots decreased and leaf area increased under low light and high nutrient conditions. These trends were confirmed, though were less dramatic, in allometric plots of Biomass Allocation throughout ontogeny. These species did not alter Biomass Allocation (beyond ontogenetic drift) in response to the broadly varying water regimes. Furthermore, many of the observed differences in Biomass Allocation were limited to a given time during growth and development. We conclude that, for these rapidly growing annual species, plasticity in Biomass al- location patterns is only partially consistent with optimal partitioning theory, and that these plastic responses are ontogenetically constrained. Further, while these species did adjust Biomass Allocation patterns in response to light and nutrient availability, they did not adjust Biomass Allocation in response to water availability, despite dramatic plasticity in growth rates along all three resource gradients. Our results support a developmentally explicit model of plasticity in Biomass Allocation in response to limiting resources.