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Bladder Cancer Diagnosis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1086 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ghulam Nabi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • selective sampling using confocal raman spectroscopy provides enhanced specificity for urinary Bladder Cancer Diagnosis
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Ishan Barman, Ghulam Nabi, Narahara Chari Dingari, Gajendra P Singh, Rajesh Kumar, Stephen Lang

    Abstract:

    In recent years, Raman spectroscopy has shown substantive promise in diagnosing Bladder Cancer, especially due to its exquisite molecular specificity. The ability to reduce false detection rates in comparison to existing diagnostic tools such as photodynamic Diagnosis makes Raman spectroscopy particularly attractive as a complementary diagnostic tool for real-time guidance of transurethral resection of Bladder tumor (TURBT). Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art high-volume Raman spectroscopic probes have not reached the expected levels of specificity thereby impeding their clinical translation. To address this issue, we propose the use of a confocal Raman probe for Bladder Cancer Diagnosis that can boost the specificity of the diagnostic algorithm based on its suppression of the out-of-focus non-analyte-specific signals emanating from the neighboring normal tissue. In this article, we engineer and apply such a probe, having depth of field of approximately 280 μm, for Raman spectral acquisition from ex vivo normal and Cancerous TURBT samples. Using this clinical dataset, a diagnostic algorithm based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is developed. We demonstrate that this approach results in comparable sensitivity but significantly higher specificity in relation to high-volume Raman spectral data. The application of only two principal components is sufficient for the discrimination of the samples underlining the robustness of the algorithm. Further, no discordance between replicate spectra is observed emphasizing the reproducible nature of the current diagnostic assessment. The high levels of sensitivity and specificity achieved in this proof-of-concept study opens substantive avenues for application of a confocal Raman probe during endoscopic procedures related to Diagnosis and treatment of Bladder Cancer.

  • Potential of urinary biomarkers in early Bladder Cancer Diagnosis
    Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ghulam Nabi

    Abstract:

    Carcinoma of urinary Bladder ranks among the top ten most common Cancers worldwide. Approximately 80% of the disease is superficial (limited to mucosa and lamina propria) at the time of presentation. However, the majority of these tumors recur and 15–20% progress into muscle-invasive disease. Cystoscopic surveillance of the urinary Bladder remains the standard of care to identify these recurrences on follow-up. Not only is this an invasive procedure, but the sensitivity of cystoscopy can be as low as 70%, so there can be up to 30% of tumors that are missed. Urinary cytology, with recognized limitations, has been used as an adjunct to this procedure, pending discovery of alternate urinary biomarkers. In the past decade there has been tremendous advancement in producing urinary biomarkers for urinary Bladder Cancer research, reflecting advancements in genomics and proteomics. An ideal biomarker should be able to replace cystoscopic examination and be cost effective. Unfortunately, most of the identified pro…

Maureen Twiddy – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The patients’ experience of a Bladder Cancer Diagnosis: a systematic review of the qualitative evidence
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2017
    Co-Authors: Amanda J. Edmondson, Jacqueline C. Birtwistle, James W.f. Catto, Maureen Twiddy

    Abstract:

    Purpose Bladder Cancer (BC) is a common disease with disparate treatment options and variable outcomes. Despite the disease’s high prevalence, little is known of the lived experience of affected patients. National patient experience surveys suggest that those with BC have poorer experiences than those with other common Cancers. The aim of this review is to identify first-hand accounts of the lived experiences of Diagnosis through to survivorship. Method This is a systematic review of the qualitative evidence reporting first-hand accounts of the experiences of being diagnosed with, treated for and surviving Bladder Cancer. A thematic analysis and ‘best-fit’ framework synthesis was undertaken to classify these experiences. Results The inconsistent nature of symptoms contributes to delays in Diagnosis. Post-Diagnosis, many patients are not actively engaged in the treatment decision-making process and rely on their doctor’s expertise. This can result in patients not adequately exploring the consequences of these decisions. Learning how to cope with a ‘post-surgery body’, changing sexuality and incontinence are distressing. Much less is known about the quality of life of patients receiving conservative treatments such as Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Conclusions The review contributes to a greater understanding of the lived experience of Bladder Cancer. Findings reflect a paucity of relevant literature and a need to develop more sensitive patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and incorporate patient-reported outcomes in BC care pathways. Implications for Cancer survivors Collective knowledge of the patients’ self-reported experience of the Cancer care pathway will facilitate understanding of the outcomes following treatment.

  • the patients experience of a Bladder Cancer Diagnosis a systematic review of the qualitative evidence
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2017
    Co-Authors: Amanda J. Edmondson, Jacqueline C. Birtwistle, James W.f. Catto, Maureen Twiddy

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Bladder Cancer (BC) is a common disease with disparate treatment options and variable outcomes. Despite the disease’s high prevalence, little is known of the lived experience of affected patients. National patient experience surveys suggest that those with BC have poorer experiences than those with other common Cancers. The aim of this review is to identify first-hand accounts of the lived experiences of Diagnosis through to survivorship.

Zhenguo Wang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Endoscopic optical coherence tomography for Bladder Cancer Diagnosis
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: Zhenguo Wang

    Abstract:

    Stony Brook University Libraries.
    SBU Graduate School in Biomedical Engineering.
    Lawrence Martin (Dean of Graduate School), Yingtian Pan, Ph.D.
    Dissertation Advisor
    Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering Department, Ki H. Chon, Ph.D.
    Chairperson of Defense
    Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering Department, Emilia Entcheva , Ph.D.
    Committee Member
    Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering Department, Christopher S. D. Lee, M.D.
    Committee Member
    Assistant Professor, Department of Urology,
    Stony Brook University Hospital.

  • Bladder Cancer Diagnosis with fluorescence guided spectral domain optical coherence tomography in a rat model
    2007 IEEE 33rd Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, 2007
    Co-Authors: Zhenguo Wang, M. Hasan

    Abstract:

    A fluorescence-image-guided spectral domain OCT (FG-SDOCT) system is described. With the recent development of spectral domain OCT, the new system is able to visualize morphological details of urinary Bladder with high image fidelity (e.g., 10um/12um axial/lateral resolutions, >110dB dynamic range) at 4~8-fold improved frame rate. Ex vivo study based on an AY-27 rat Cancer model was performed to evaluate its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity. Total 82 specimens were examined by hyperisin-induced fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy sequentially. The preliminary results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of FG-SDOCT is 100% and 90% respectively, compared to 85% and 49% for fluorescence imaging. This significant improvement indicates that FG-OCT is a very promising technique for effective early Bladder Cancer Diagnosis in combination of endoscopic OCT.

  • INTERPIXEL-SHIFTED ENDOSCOPIC OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FOR IN VIVO Bladder Cancer Diagnosis
    International Journal of Image and Graphics, 2007
    Co-Authors: Zhenguo Wang, Wayne C. Waltzer, Zhijia Yuan

    Abstract:

    An interpixel-shifted spectral imaging technique is applied to MEMS-based spectral-domain endoscopic optical coherence tomography (SDEOCT) to enhance signal-to-noise ratio and effective imaging depth for in vivo imaging Diagnosis of biological tissue. To validate the enhancements of pixel-shifted SDEOCT, experimental comparisons are presented to image animal and human Bladder architectures in vivo and to diagnose human transitional cell Cancers. Preliminary study shows that interpixel shifted SDEOCT not only increases the depth of field of SDOCT but also eliminates excessive artifacts induced by spectral aliasing effect, thus improving image contrast in areas with large depths (e.g. over 1.5 mm). These results suggest that endoscopic OCT equipped with interpixel-shifted spectral camera has the potential to enhance the Diagnosis of biological tissue in in vivo settings that require a larger field of view in the axial direction, such as papillary Bladder tumors with deep surface irregularities (e.g. asperities or invaginations).