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Bouguer

The Experts below are selected from a list of 285 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

J P Gastelluetchegorry – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the stochastic beer lambert Bouguer law for discontinuous vegetation canopies
    Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: N Shabanov, J P Gastelluetchegorry

    Abstract:

    Abstract The 3D distribution of canopy foliage affects the radiation regime and retrievals of canopy biophysical parameters. The gap fraction is one primary indicator of a canopy structure. Historically the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law and the linear mixture model have served as a basis for multiple technologies for retrievals of the gap (or vegetation) fraction and Leaf Area Index (LAI). The Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is a form of the Radiative Transfer (RT) equation for homogeneous canopies, which was later adjusted for a correlation between fitoelements using concept of the clumping index. The Stochastic Radiative Transfer (SRT) approach has been developed specifically for heterogeneous canopies, however the approach lacks a proper model of the vegetation fraction. This study is focused on the implementation of the stochastic version of the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law for heterogeneous canopies, featuring the following principles: 1) two mechanisms perform photon transport- transmission through the turbid medium of foliage crowns and direct streaming through canopy gaps, 2) the radiation field is influenced by a canopy structure (quantified by the statistical moments of a canopy structure) and a foliage density (quantified by the gap fraction as a function of LAI), 3) the notions of canopy transmittance and gap fraction are distinct. The derived stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is consistent with the Geometrical Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) derivations. Analytical and numerical analysis of the stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law presented in this study provides the basis to reformulate widely used technologies for retrievals of the gap fraction and LAI from ground and satellite radiation measurements.

N Shabanov – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the stochastic beer lambert Bouguer law for discontinuous vegetation canopies
    Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: N Shabanov, J P Gastelluetchegorry

    Abstract:

    Abstract The 3D distribution of canopy foliage affects the radiation regime and retrievals of canopy biophysical parameters. The gap fraction is one primary indicator of a canopy structure. Historically the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law and the linear mixture model have served as a basis for multiple technologies for retrievals of the gap (or vegetation) fraction and Leaf Area Index (LAI). The Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is a form of the Radiative Transfer (RT) equation for homogeneous canopies, which was later adjusted for a correlation between fitoelements using concept of the clumping index. The Stochastic Radiative Transfer (SRT) approach has been developed specifically for heterogeneous canopies, however the approach lacks a proper model of the vegetation fraction. This study is focused on the implementation of the stochastic version of the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law for heterogeneous canopies, featuring the following principles: 1) two mechanisms perform photon transport- transmission through the turbid medium of foliage crowns and direct streaming through canopy gaps, 2) the radiation field is influenced by a canopy structure (quantified by the statistical moments of a canopy structure) and a foliage density (quantified by the gap fraction as a function of LAI), 3) the notions of canopy transmittance and gap fraction are distinct. The derived stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is consistent with the Geometrical Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) derivations. Analytical and numerical analysis of the stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law presented in this study provides the basis to reformulate widely used technologies for retrievals of the gap fraction and LAI from ground and satellite radiation measurements.

  • The stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law for discontinuous vegetation canopies
    Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: N Shabanov, Jean-philippe Gastellu-etchegorry

    Abstract:

    Abstract The 3D distribution of canopy foliage affects the radiation regime and retrievals of canopy biophysical parameters. The gap fraction is one primary indicator of a canopy structure. Historically the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law and the linear mixture model have served as a basis for multiple technologies for retrievals of the gap (or vegetation) fraction and Leaf Area Index (LAI). The Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is a form of the Radiative Transfer (RT) equation for homogeneous canopies, which was later adjusted for a correlation between fitoelements using concept of the clumping index. The Stochastic Radiative Transfer (SRT) approach has been developed specifically for heterogeneous canopies, however the approach lacks a proper model of the vegetation fraction. This study is focused on the implementation of the stochastic version of the Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law for heterogeneous canopies, featuring the following principles: 1) two mechanisms perform photon transport- transmission through the turbid medium of foliage crowns and direct streaming through canopy gaps, 2) the radiation field is influenced by a canopy structure (quantified by the statistical moments of a canopy structure) and a foliage density (quantified by the gap fraction as a function of LAI), 3) the notions of canopy transmittance and gap fraction are distinct. The derived stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law is consistent with the Geometrical Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) derivations. Analytical and numerical analysis of the stochastic Beer–Lambert–Bouguer law presented in this study provides the basis to reformulate widely used technologies for retrievals of the gap fraction and LAI from ground and satellite radiation measurements.

Will Featherstone – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Band‐limited Bouguer gravity identifies new basins on the Moon
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2013
    Co-Authors: Will Featherstone, Christian Hirt, Michael Kuhn

    Abstract:

    [1] Spectral domain forward modeling is used to generate topography-implied gravity for the Moon using data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument operated on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. This is subtracted from Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE)-derived gravity to generate band-limited Bouguer gravity maps of the Moon so as to enhance the gravitational signatures of anomalous mass densities nearer the surface. This procedure adds evidence that two previously postulated basins on the lunar farside, Fitzgerald-Jackson (25°N, 191°E) and to the east of Debye (50°N, 180°E), are indeed real. When applied over the entire lunar surface, band-limited Bouguer gravity reveals the locations of 280 candidate basins that have not been identified when using full-spectrum gravity or topography alone, showing the approach to be of utility. Of the 280 basins, 66 are classified as distinct from their band-limited Bouguer gravity and topographic signatures, making them worthy of further investigation.

  • band limited Bouguer gravity identifies new basins on the moon
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2013
    Co-Authors: Will Featherstone, Christian Hirt, Michael Kuhn

    Abstract:

    [1] Spectral domain forward modeling is used to generate topography-implied gravity for the Moon using data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument operated on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. This is subtracted from Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE)-derived gravity to generate band-limited Bouguer gravity maps of the Moon so as to enhance the gravitational signatures of anomalous mass densities nearer the surface. This procedure adds evidence that two previously postulated basins on the lunar farside, Fitzgerald-Jackson (25°N, 191°E) and to the east of Debye (50°N, 180°E), are indeed real. When applied over the entire lunar surface, band-limited Bouguer gravity reveals the locations of 280 candidate basins that have not been identified when using full-spectrum gravity or topography alone, showing the approach to be of utility. Of the 280 basins, 66 are classified as distinct from their band-limited Bouguer gravity and topographic signatures, making them worthy of further investigation.

  • complete spherical Bouguer gravity anomalies over australia
    Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 2009
    Co-Authors: Michael Kuhn, Will Featherstone, Jonathan Kirby

    Abstract:

    Complete (or refined) spherical Bouguer gravity anomalies have been computed for all 1 095 065 land gravity observations in the June 2007 release of the Australian national gravity database. The spherical Bouguer shell contribution was computed using the supplied ground elevations of the gravity observations. The spherical terrain corrections, residual to each Bouguer shell, were computed on a 9 arc-second grid (∼250 m by ∼250 m spatial resolution) from a global Newtonian integration using heights from version 2.1 of the GEODATA digital elevation model (DEM) over Australia and the GLOBE and JGP95E global DEMs outside Australia. A constant topographic mass-density of 2670 kg/m3 was used for both the spherical Bouguer shell and spherical terrain correction terms. The difference between the complete spherical and complete planar Bouguer gravity anomaly exhibits an almost constant bias of about −18.7 mGal over areas with moderate elevation changes, thus verifying the planar model as a reasonable approximation…