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Bromoviridae

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Wilmer J Cuellar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Characterization of distinct strains of an aphid-transmitted ilarvirus (Fam. Bromoviridae) infecting different hosts from South America.
    Virus research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Rocio Silvestre, Wilmer J Cuellar, Segundo Fuentes, Roger Risco, Alfredo Berrocal, Ian Adams, Jan Kreuze

    Abstract:

    Potato yellowing virus (PYV, original code SB-22), an unassigned member of the Genus Ilarvirus Family Bromoviridae, has been reported infecting potatoes in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is associated with symptomless infections, however yellowing of young leaves has been observed in some potato cultivars. Thirteen potato and yacon isolates were selected after routine screening of CIP-germplasm and twenty-four were identified from 994 potato plants collected in Peru whereas one was intercepted from yacon in the UK. These isolates were identified using high throughput sequencing, ELISA, host range, RT-PCR. Here we report the sequence characterization of the complete genomes of nine PYV isolates found infecting Solanum tuberosum, four complete genome isolates infecting Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), and in addition 15 complete RNA 3 sequences from potato and partial sequences of RNA 1, 2 and 3 of isolates infecting papa y yacon from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Results of phylogenetic and recombination analysis showed RNA3 to be the most variable among the virus isolates and suggest potato infecting isolates have resulted through acquisition of a movement protein variant through recombination with an unknown but related ilarvirus, whereas one yacon isolate from Bolivia also had resulted from a recombination event with another related viruses in the same region. Yacon isolates could be distinguished from potato isolates by their inability to infect Physalis floridana, and potato isolates from Ecuador and Peru could be distinguished by their symptomatology in this host as well as phylogenetically. The non-recombinant yacon isolates were closely related to a recently describe isolate from Solanum muricatum (Pepino), and all isolates were related to Fragaria chiloensis latent virus (FCiLV) reported in strawberry from Chile, and probably should be considered the same species. Although PYV is not serologically related to Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), they are both transmitted by aphids and share several other characteristics that support the previous suggestion to reclassify AMV as a member in the genus Ilarvirus.

  • characterization of distinct strains of an aphid transmitted ilarvirus fam Bromoviridae infecting different hosts from south america
    Virus Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Rocio Silvestre, Wilmer J Cuellar, Segundo Fuentes, Roger Risco, Alfredo Berrocal, Ian P Adams

    Abstract:

    Abstract Potato yellowing virus (PYV, original code SB-22), an unassigned member of the Genus Ilarvirus Family Bromoviridae, has been reported infecting potatoes in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is associated with symptomless infections, however yellowing of young leaves has been observed in some potato cultivars. Thirteen potato and yacon isolates were selected after routine screening of CIP-germplasm and twenty-four were identified from 994 potato plants collected in Peru whereas one was intercepted from yacon in the UK. These isolates were identified using high throughput sequencing, ELISA, host range and RT-PCR. Here we report the sequence characterization of the complete genomes of nine PYV isolates found infecting Solanum tuberosum, four complete genome isolates infecting Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), and in addition 15 complete RNA3 sequences from potato and partial sequences of RNA1, 2 and 3 of isolates infecting potato and yacon from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Results of phylogenetic and recombination analysis showed RNA3 to be the most variable among the virus isolates and suggest potato infecting isolates have resulted through acquisition of a movement protein variant through recombination with an unknown but related ilarvirus, whereas one yacon isolate from Bolivia also had resulted from a recombination event with another related viruses in the same region. Yacon isolates could be distinguished from potato isolates by their inability to infect Physalis floridana, and potato isolates from Ecuador and Peru could be distinguished by their symptomatology in this host as well as phylogenetically. The non-recombinant yacon isolates were closely related to a recently described isolate from Solanum muricatum (pepino dulce), and all isolates were related to Fragaria chiloensis latent virus (FCiLV) reported in strawberry from Chile, and probably should be considered the same species. Although PYV is not serologically related to Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), they are both transmitted by aphids and share several other characteristics that support the previous suggestion to reclassify AMV as a member in the genus Ilarvirus.

  • first report of potato yellowing virus genus ilarvirus in solanum phureja from ecuador
    Plant Disease, 2011
    Co-Authors: Rocio Silvestre, Milton Untiveros, Wilmer J Cuellar

    Abstract:

    A bacilliform virus, named Potato yellowing virus (PYV), causing chlorosis of leaves was reported in 1992 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) fields in Peru (1) and symptomless wild potatoes (S. fernandezianum) in Chile (4). PYV is reported as an alfamo-like virus (1) (family Bromoviridae) but no sequence information is available for this virus, making its taxonomic position inside the Bromoviridae uncertain (currently this family is organized into five genera: Alfamovirus, Bromovirus, Cucumovirus, Ilarvirus, and Oleavirus). Herein we report the presence of PYV in native potatoes (Solanum phureja) collected from Ecuador where the crop constitutes an important source of income in rural communities. Forty accessions of S. phureja collected in Ecuador in June 1986 and maintained in vitro at the International Potato Center (CIP) germplasm bank were analyzed by double-antibody sandwich (DAS)-ELISA with antiserum raised against a Peruvian isolate of PYV (1). PYV was detected in six accessions (15% of the material) co…

S. W. Scott – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • eLS – Bromoviridae and Allies
    Encyclopedia of Life Sciences, 2001
    Co-Authors: S. W. Scott

    Abstract:

    The family Bromoviridae consists of six genera: Alfamovirus, Anulavirus, Bromovirus, Cucumovirus, Ilarvirus and Oleavirus. All viruses in these genera possess tripartite genomes of single-stranded, linear, positive-sense ribonucleic acid (RNA), in which expression of the downstream codon of the RNA3 is via a subgenomic messenger RNA (mRNA) (RNA4). Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was the sole member of the genus Idaeovirus for many years and shares features in common with members of the genus Ilarvirus and Alfamovirus, but possesses a bipartite genome and is not currently assigned to a family. Members of the genera Alfamovirus, Bromovirus and Cucumovirus have been used extensively as model systems for research on molecular aspects of plant virology.

    Key Concepts:

    Although all members of the Bromoviridae have similar particle morphologies (quasi-spherical and bacilliform) and possess tripartite genomes, a range of different strategies is used to express the products of the different genomes.

    The phenomenon of genome activation by the coat protein was unique to the ilarviruses and Alfalfa mosaic virus but has recently been demonstrated for RBDV.

    The natural host ranges of Cucumber mosaic virus and Alfalfa mosaic virus are extensive whereas many other viruses described in this article have an extremely limited natural host range.

    Complete genomic nucleotide sequences are available from GenBank for the majority of viruses referred to in this article.

    Keywords:

    Alfamovirus;
    Anulavirus;
    Bromovirus;
    Cucumovirus;
    Ilarvirus;
    Oleavirus;
    Idaeovirus

  • Bromoviridae and allies
    eLS, 2001
    Co-Authors: S. W. Scott

    Abstract:

    The family Bromoviridae consists of six genera: Alfamovirus, Anulavirus, Bromovirus, Cucumovirus, Ilarvirus and Oleavirus. All viruses in these genera possess tripartite genomes of single-stranded, linear, positive-sense ribonucleic acid (RNA), in which expression of the downstream codon of the RNA3 is via a subgenomic messenger RNA (mRNA) (RNA4). Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was the sole member of the genus Idaeovirus for many years and shares features in common with members of the genus Ilarvirus and Alfamovirus, but possesses a bipartite genome and is not currently assigned to a family. Members of the genera Alfamovirus, Bromovirus and Cucumovirus have been used extensively as model systems for research on molecular aspects of plant virology.

    Key Concepts:

    Although all members of the Bromoviridae have similar particle morphologies (quasi-spherical and bacilliform) and possess tripartite genomes, a range of different strategies is used to express the products of the different genomes.

    The phenomenon of genome activation by the coat protein was unique to the ilarviruses and Alfalfa mosaic virus but has recently been demonstrated for RBDV.

    The natural host ranges of Cucumber mosaic virus and Alfalfa mosaic virus are extensive whereas many other viruses described in this article have an extremely limited natural host range.

    Complete genomic nucleotide sequences are available from GenBank for the majority of viruses referred to in this article.

    Keywords:

    Alfamovirus;
    Anulavirus;
    Bromovirus;
    Cucumovirus;
    Ilarvirus;
    Oleavirus;
    Idaeovirus

  • ilarviruses encode a cucumovirus like 2b gene that is absent in other genera within the Bromoviridae
    Journal of Virology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Lianghui Ji, S. W. Scott, Robert H. Symons, Shou-wei Ding

    Abstract:

    We found that RNA 2 of the four ilarviruses sequenced to date encodes an additional conserved open reading frame (ORF), 2b, that overlaps the 3′ end of the previously known ORF, 2a. A novel RNA species of 851 nucleotides was found to accumulate to high levels in plants infected with spinach latent virus (SpLV). Further analysis showed that RNA 4A is a subgenomic RNA of RNA 2 and encodes all of ORF 2b. Moreover, a protein species of the size expected for SpLV ORF 2b was translated in vitro from the RNA 4A-containing virion RNAs. The data support the suggestion that the SpLV 2b protein is translated in vivo. The 2b gene of ilarviruses, which is not encoded by alfamoviruses and bromoviruses, shares several features with the previously reported cucumovirus 2b gene; however, their encoded proteins share no detectable sequence similarities. The evolutionary origin of the 2b gene is discussed.

Vicente Pallas – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • RNA-binding properties and mapping of the RNA-binding domain from the movement protein of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus.
    The Journal of general virology, 2020
    Co-Authors: M Carmen Herranz, Vicente Pallas

    Abstract:

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is involved in intercellular virus transport. In this study, putative RNA-binding properties of the PNRSV MP were studied. The PNRSV MP was produced in Escherichia coli using an expression vector. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using DIG-labelled riboprobes demonstrated that PNRSV MP bound ssRNA cooperatively without sequence specificity. Two different ribonucleoprotein complexes were found to be formed depending on the molar MP : PNRSV RNA ratio. The different responses of the complexes to urea treatment strongly suggested that they have different structural properties. Deletion mutagenesis followed by Northwestern analysis allowed location of a nucleic acid binding domain to aa 56-88. This 33 aa RNA-binding motif is the smallest region delineated among members of the family Bromoviridae for which RNA-binding properties have been demonstrated. This domain is highly conserved within all phylogenetic subgroups previously described for PNRSV isolates. Interestingly, the RNA-binding domain described here and the one described for Alfamovirus are located at the N terminus of their corresponding MPs, whereas similar domains previously characterized in members of the genera Bromovirus and Cucumovirus are present at the C terminus, strongly reflecting their corresponding phylogenetic relationships. The evolutionary implications of this observation are discussed.

  • Recognition of cis-acting sequences in RNA 3 of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus by the replicase of Alfalfa mosaic virus.
    The Journal of general virology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Frederic Aparicio, José Ángel Sánchez-navarro, René C. L. Olsthoorn, Vicente Pallas

    Abstract:

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) belong to the genera ALFAMOVIRUS: and ILARVIRUS:, respectively, of the family Bromoviridae: Initiation of infection by AMV and PNRSV requires binding of a few molecules of coat protein (CP) to the 3′ termini of the inoculum RNAs and the CPs of the two viruses are interchangeable in this early step of the replication cycle. CIS:-acting sequences in PNRSV RNA 3 that are recognized by the AMV replicase were studied in in vitro replicase assays and by inoculation of AMV-PNRSV RNA 3 chimeras to tobacco plants and protoplasts transformed with the AMV replicase genes (P12 plants). The results showed that the AMV replicase recognized the promoter for minus-strand RNA synthesis in PNRSV RNA 3 but not the promoter for plus-strand RNA synthesis. A chimeric RNA with PNRSV movement protein and CP genes accumulated in tobacco, which is a non-host for PNRSV.

  • ictv virus taxonomy profile Bromoviridae
    Journal of General Virology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Joseph Bujarski, Vicente Pallas, Donato Gallitelli, Fernando Garciaarenal, Peter Palukaitis, Krishna M Reddy, Aiming Wang

    Abstract:

    Bromoviridae is a family of plant viruses with tri-segmented, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes of about 8 kb in total. Genomic RNAs are packaged in separate virions that may also contain subgenomic, defective or satellite RNAs. Virions are variable in morphology (spherical or bacilliform) and are transmitted between hosts mechanically, in/on the pollen and non-persistently by insect vectors. Members of the family are responsible for major disease epidemics in fruit, vegetable and fodder crops such as tomato, cucurbits, bananas, fruit trees and alfalfa. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the family Bromoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/Bromoviridae.