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2-Methylisoborneol

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Peter B. Johnsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dehydration products of 2-Methylisoborneol are not responsible for off-flavor in the channel catfish
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 1993
    Co-Authors: Owen E. Mills, Si Yin Chung, Peter B. Johnsen

    Abstract:

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses indicated that volatile fractions of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) covering a range of flavor quality were all found to contain 2-methylenebornane and 2-methyl-2-bornene, dehydration products of 2-Methylisoborneol. Gas chromatographic effluent sniffing indicated that the only «earthy/musty» odor compounds present were identified as 2-Methylisoborneol and geosmin. It was concluded that 2-methylenebornane and 2-methyl-2-bornene, which do not have discernible odors, do not contribute to off-flavor, contrary to an earlier study

  • Influence of fat content on uptake and depuration of the off-flavor 2-Methylisoborneol by channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)
    Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 1992
    Co-Authors: Peter B. Johnsen, Steven W. Lloyd

    Abstract:

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) of different tissue fat contents (0.5–11.0%) were held in water containing approximately 0.5 μg/L of the off-flavor compound 2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) for various times. A new analytical method was developed to quantify tissue burdens of MIB. Fish showed significant bioconcentration of MIB after 2 h and equilibrium by 24 h. The fatter fish (> 2.5% muscle fat) accumulated nearly three times more MIB than lean fish (

Steven W. Lloyd – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Comparison of analytical techniques for detection of geosmin and 2-Methylisoborneol in aqueous samples.
    Journal of chromatographic science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Barry K. Hurlburt, Steven W. Lloyd, Casey C. Grimm

    Abstract:

    Geosmin and 2-Methylisoborneol are secondary metabolites expressed by a variety of organisms that are responsible for off-flavors in public water supplies, aquaculture, and a host of other important products. Hence, there is continuing research into the causes for their expression and methods to mitigate it, which require sensitive and accurate detection methods. In recent years, several new techniques for collecting and concentrating volatile and semi-volatile compounds have been automated and commercialized, making them available for use in most laboratories. In this study, we compared solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) for the detection of 2-Methylisoborneol and geosmin in aqueous samples. SPME is the most sensitive of these techniques with a limit of detection of 25 parts-per-trillion for 2-Methylisoborneol and 10 parts-per-trillion for geosmin but with a large relative standard deviation. MASE is less sensitive, but provides a greater level of precision, as well as the ability for multiple injections from the same sample.

  • instrumental versus sensory detection of off flavors in farm raised channel catfish
    Aquaculture, 2004
    Co-Authors: Casey C. Grimm, Steven W. Lloyd, Paul V Zimba

    Abstract:

    Results from an instrumental method for determining the presence of the earthy, muddy or bluegreen off-flavor in catfish were compared with those of four professional flavor checkers. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used to detect the off-flavor compounds, 2-Methylisoborneol and geosmin. The odor threshold for an average flavor checker was determined to lie between 0.1 and 0.2 Ag/kg for 2-Methylisoborneol and estimated at 0.25 to 0.5 Ag/ kg for geosmin. The odor threshold for geosmin in channel catfish appears to be only slightly greater than that of MIB. The lower end of the sensory limits served as the instrumental cutoffs for grading fish off-flavor. Comparison of the instrumental method versus the flavor checkers resulted in a high correlation (R=0.9). D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • Influence of fat content on uptake and depuration of the off-flavor 2-Methylisoborneol by channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)
    Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 1992
    Co-Authors: Peter B. Johnsen, Steven W. Lloyd

    Abstract:

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) of different tissue fat contents (0.5–11.0%) were held in water containing approximately 0.5 μg/L of the off-flavor compound 2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) for various times. A new analytical method was developed to quantify tissue burdens of MIB. Fish showed significant bioconcentration of MIB after 2 h and equilibrium by 24 h. The fatter fish (> 2.5% muscle fat) accumulated nearly three times more MIB than lean fish (

Richard W. Eaton – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dehydration of the off-flavor chemical 2-Methylisoborneol by the R-limonene-degrading bacteria Pseudomonas sp. strain 19-rlim and Sphingomonas sp. strain BIR2-rlima
    Biodegradation, 2012
    Co-Authors: Richard W. Eaton

    Abstract:

    The terpene 2-Methylisoborneol (MIB), a major cause of off-flavor in farm-raised catfish and drinking water, is transformed by various different terpene-degrading bacteria. Two of these, the R-limonene-degrading strains Pseudomonas sp. 19-rlim and Sphingomonas sp. BIR2-rlima, dehydrated MIB with the formation of odorless metabolites 2-methylenebornane and 4-methylcamphene. These metabolites which have a structural resemblance to camphor, could be further transformed by camphor-degrading bacteria to more oxidized products. The bacterial dehydrations demonstrated here may have application in removing MIB where it is a problem.

  • Biotransformations of 2-Methylisoborneol by Camphor-Degrading Bacteria
    Applied and environmental microbiology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Richard W. Eaton, Peter Sandusky

    Abstract:

    Many camphor-degrading bacteria that are able to transform 2-Methylisoborneol (2-MIB) have been identified. Three of these strains have been examined in detail. Rhodococcus ruber T1 metabolizes camphor through 6-hydroxycamphor but converts 2-MIB to 3-hydroxy-2-MIB. Pseudomonas putida G1, which metabolizes camphor through 5-hydroxycamphor, converts MIB primarily to 6-hydroxy-2-MIB. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis DLC-cam converts 2-MIB through 5-hydroxy-2-MIB to 5-keto-2-MIB. Together, these three strains produce metabolites resulting from hydroxylation at all of the three available secondary carbons on the six-member ring of 2-MIB.