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Radisav D. Vidic – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • life cycle impact and benefit trade offs of a produced water and Abandoned Mine drainage cotreatment process
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yan Wang, Radisav D. Vidic, Sakineh Tavakkoli, Vikas Khanna, Leanne M Gilbertson

    Abstract:

    A cotreatment process for produced water and Abandoned Mine drainage (AMD) has been established and demonstrated at the pilot-scale. The present study evaluates the potential of the proposed process to aid in management of two high volume wastewater resources in Pennsylvania. A systems-level approach is established to evaluate the primary trade-offs, including cotreatment process environmental impacts, transportation impacts, and environmental benefits realized from precluding direct AMD release to the environment. Life cycle impact assessment was used to quantify the environmental and human health impacts as well as to identify “hot spots” of the cotreatment process. Electricity use was found to be the dominant contributor to all impact categories. Extending the system boundary to include transportation of the two wastewaters to a to-be-deterMined cotreatment site revealed the important impact of transportation. An optimization approach was employed (using the region of Southwest Pennsylvania) to evaluat…

  • co treatment of Abandoned Mine drainage and marcellus shale flowback water for use in hydraulic fracturing
    Water Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Tieyuan Zhang, Radisav D. Vidic

    Abstract:

    Flowback water generated during shale gas extraction in Pennsylvania is mostly reused for hydraulic fracturing operation. Abandoned Mine drainage (AMD), one of the most widespread threats to water quality in Pennsylvania, can potentially serve as a make-up water source to enable flowback water reuse. This study demonstrated co-treatment of flowback water and AMD produced in northeastern Pennsylvania in a pilot-scale system consisting of rapid mix reactor, flocculation tank and sedimentation tank. Sulfate concentration in the finished water can be controlled at a desired level (i.e., below 100 mg/L) by adjusting the ratio of flowback water and AMD in the influent. Fe3+ contained in the AMD can serve as a coagulant to enhance the removal of suspended solids, during which Fe2+ is co-precipitated and the total iron is reduced to a desirable level. Solid waste generated in this process (i.e., barite) will incorporate over 99% of radium present in the flowback water, which offers the possibility to control the fate of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) brought to the surface by unconventional gas extraction. Sludge recirculation in the treatment process can be used to increase the size of barite particles formed by mixing flowback water and AMD to meet specifications for use as a weighting agent in drilling fluid. This alternative management approach for NORM can be used to offset the treatment cost and promote flowback water reuse, reduce environmental impacts of AMD and reduce pressure on fresh water sources.

  • Corrosion control when using passively treated Abandoned Mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.
    Water Environment Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mingkai Hsieh, Shih-hsiang Chien, Jason D Monnell, David A Dzombak, Radisav D. Vidic

    Abstract:

    Passively treated Abandoned Mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of Abandoned Mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloraMine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

Yosoon Choi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • UMineAR: Mobile-Tablet-Based Abandoned Mine Hazard Site Investigation Support System Using Augmented Reality
    Minerals, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jangwon Suh, Sangho Lee, Yosoon Choi

    Abstract:

    Conventional Mine site investigation has difficulties in fostering location awareness and understanding the subsurface environment; moreover, it produces a large amount of hardcopy data. To overcome these limitations, the UMineAR mobile tablet application was developed. It enables users to rapidly identify underground Mine objects (drifts, entrances, boreholes, hazards) and intuitively visualize them in 3D using a mobile augmented reality (AR) technique. To design UMineAR, South Korean georeferenced standard-Mine geographic information system (GIS) databases were employed. A web database system was designed to access via a tablet groundwater-level data measured every hour by sensors installed in boreholes. UMineAR consists of search, AR, map, and database modules. The search module provides data retrieval and visualization options/functions. The AR module provides 3D interactive visualization of Mine GIS data and camera imagery on the tablet screen. The map module shows the locations of corresponding borehole data on a 2D map. The database module provides Mine GIS database management functions. A case study showed that the proposed application is suitable for onsite visualization of high-volume Mine GIS data based on geolocations; no specialized equipment or skills are required to understand the underground Mine environment. UMineAR can be used to support AbandonedMine hazard site investigations.

  • a rapid accurate and efficient method to map heavy metal contaminated soils of Abandoned Mine sites using converted portable xrf data and gis
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jangwon Suh, Hyeongyu Lee, Yosoon Choi

    Abstract:

    The use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) increases the rapidity and accuracy of soil contamination mapping, respectively. In practice, it is often necessary to repeat the soil contamination assessment and mapping procedure several times during soil management within a limited budget. In this study, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate soil contamination mapping method using a PXRF data and geostatistical spatial interpolation. To obtain a large quantity of high quality data for interpolation, in situ PXRF data analyzed at 40 points were transformed to converted PXRF data using the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. The method was applied to an Abandoned Mine site in Korea to generate a soil contamination map for copper and was validated for investigation speed and prediction accuracy. As a result, regions that required soil remediation were identified. Our method significantly shortened the time required for mapping compared to the conventional mapping method and provided copper concentration estimates with high accuracy similar to those measured by ICP-AES. Therefore, our method is an effective way of mapping soil contamination if we consistently construct a database based on the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data.

  • Mapping copper and lead concentrations at Abandoned Mine areas using element analysis data from ICP-AES and portable XRF instruments: A comparative study
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2016
    Co-Authors: Hyeongyu Lee, Yosoon Choi, Jangwon Suh, Seung Ho Lee

    Abstract:

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and Abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP-AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP-AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan Abandoned Mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP-AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP-AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an Abandoned Mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data.

Tieyuan Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • co treatment of Abandoned Mine drainage and marcellus shale flowback water for use in hydraulic fracturing
    Water Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Tieyuan Zhang, Radisav D. Vidic

    Abstract:

    Flowback water generated during shale gas extraction in Pennsylvania is mostly reused for hydraulic fracturing operation. Abandoned Mine drainage (AMD), one of the most widespread threats to water quality in Pennsylvania, can potentially serve as a make-up water source to enable flowback water reuse. This study demonstrated co-treatment of flowback water and AMD produced in northeastern Pennsylvania in a pilot-scale system consisting of rapid mix reactor, flocculation tank and sedimentation tank. Sulfate concentration in the finished water can be controlled at a desired level (i.e., below 100 mg/L) by adjusting the ratio of flowback water and AMD in the influent. Fe3+ contained in the AMD can serve as a coagulant to enhance the removal of suspended solids, during which Fe2+ is co-precipitated and the total iron is reduced to a desirable level. Solid waste generated in this process (i.e., barite) will incorporate over 99% of radium present in the flowback water, which offers the possibility to control the fate of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) brought to the surface by unconventional gas extraction. Sludge recirculation in the treatment process can be used to increase the size of barite particles formed by mixing flowback water and AMD to meet specifications for use as a weighting agent in drilling fluid. This alternative management approach for NORM can be used to offset the treatment cost and promote flowback water reuse, reduce environmental impacts of AMD and reduce pressure on fresh water sources.