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Aelurostrongylus abstrusus

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Angela Di Cesare – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Seroprevalence of antibodies against the cat lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus in cats from endemic areas of Italy.
    Veterinary parasitology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Angela Di Cesare, Donato Traversa, Paolo Emidio Crisi, Fabrizia Veronesi, Simone Morelli, Emily Katharina Gueldner, Christina Strube, Fabrizio Pampurini, Manuela Schnyder

    Abstract:

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) is a worldwide occurring lungworm causing verminous pneumonia in cats. To date the Baermann method is the most used procedure to diagnose A. abstrusus infection by isolating first stage larvae from faeces, though its sensitivity and specificity can be impaired by several factors. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against A. abstrusus has been recently developed as a diagnostic alternative. The present study evaluated the seroprevalence for A. abstrusus infection in cats from two endemic areas of Italy. Overall, 250 sera were sampled and tested for the presence of antibodies against A. abstrusus. Based on the results obtained from 20 cats proven to be infected by A. abstrusus using Baermann technique and molecular methods, and from 20 negative cats (Subset A), a cut off value of 0.347 optical density (OD) was determined, leading to a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 100%. Two-hundred and ten cats (142 and 68 from Abruzzo and Umbria regions, respectively) were included in Subset B (i.e. 202 negative by Baermann examination and 8 positive for Troglostrongylus brevior). Antibodies against A. abstrusus were detected in forty-five (21.4%, 95% CI: 16.1-27.6%) samples. This study confirms the occurrence of A. abstrusus in endemic areas of Italy and indicates that one-fifth of randomly selected cats have or had a lungworm infection with production of antibodies.

  • Severe Verminous Pneumonia Caused by Natural Mixed Infection with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Angiostrongylus chabaudi in a European Wildcat from Western Balkan Area
    Acta Parasitologica, 2019
    Co-Authors: Oliver Stevanović, Anastasia Diakou, Simone Morelli, Smiljana Paraš, Igor Trbojević, Drago Nedić, Željko Sladojević, Dragan Kasagić, Angela Di Cesare

    Abstract:

    Aims Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Railliet, 1898) and Angiostrongylus chabaudi (Biocca, 1957) are important cardiopulmonary metastrongyloids in felids. This case report describes, for the first time, a natural and patent mixed infection caused by A. abstrusus and A. chabaudi in a European wildcat ( Felis silvestris silvestris ) from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Most important, this is a rare report of fatal parasitism in wildlife, involving a severe verminous bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal nematode and cestode infection with Toxocara cati , Taenia taeniaeformis , Aonchotheca putorii, and Ancylostoma spp. Results Emphasis is set to detailed description of granulomatous, interstitial verminous bronchopneumonia, morphological description of A. abstrusus and A. chabaudi, and molecular confirmation of diagnosis by triplex PCR. Conclusion The data provided in this study contribute to the knowledge on the epizootiology and pathological effect of these neglected metastrongyloids in European wildcat.

  • Mitochondrial haplotypes of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) from domestic and wild felids
    Parasitology Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Donato Traversa, Fabrizia Veronesi, Raffaella Iorio, Giulia Simonato, Anastasia Diakou, Federica Marcer, Angela Di Cesare

    Abstract:

    The lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is the most important respiratory parasite of domestic cats. Pulmonary aelurostrongylosis has been reported in wild felids, though unequivocally evidence of wildlife infection by A . abstrusus is scant. Recently, Troglostrongylus brevior , a lungworm usually infecting wild felids, has been described in domestic cats from Mediterranean areas. The present work evaluates the sequence variation of an informative region within the gene encoding the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of A . abstrusus and T . brevior , in order to provide novel information on the genetic make-up of these lungworms. Parasitic stages of A . abstrusus and T . brevior were collected from domestic and wild hosts (i.e., domestic cat, European wildcat, caracal, serval, and lion) from Italy, Greece, and South Africa. Five (HI-HV) and four (HI-HIV) haplotypes were recorded for A . abstrusus and T . brevior , respectively, mostly shared between domestic and wild felids in different geographical areas. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all haplotypes of A . abstrusus and T . brevior clustered as monophyletic groups with a strong nodal support, indicating that all haplotypes identified were distinct from each other. All sequence types represent two distinct species, A . abstrusus and T . brevior , and these genetic convergences are also detected within and among populations of these nematodes, irrespective of their hosts and geographical origin. The occurrence of A . abstrusus and T . brevior haplotypes in different hosts from the same regions and between different countries indicates that the same lungworm populations circulate in domestic and wild hosts under the same routes of transmission.

Domenico Otranto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serological survey and risk factors of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus infection among owned cats in Italy
    Parasitology Research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria Alfonsa Cavalera, Vito Colella, E. Brianti, Manuela Schnyder, Emily Katharina Gueldner, Tommaso Furlanello, Roberta Iatta, Christina Strube, Domenico Otranto

    Abstract:

    Feline lungworms affect the respiratory tract of domestic cats causing respiratory conditions of various degrees. In this study, we investigated the exposure of cats to feline lungworm infections by detecting antibodies in a large population of animals from several regions of Italy. Sera of 1087 domestic cats living in regions of the north ( n  = 700), the centre ( n  = 227) and the south ( n  = 160) of Italy were examined by a newly developed indirect ELISA conceived for detection of antibodies against the most frequently occurring feline lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus . Individual cat data (i.e., age, sex, neutering status and provenience) were analysed as potential risk factors for exposure to lungworm infections. Samples were additionally screened for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) proviral DNAs. Overall, 9% (98/1087; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.4–10.9%) of the animals tested seropositive to lungworm antibodies. Positive cats were identified in the north (7.1%; CI 5.5–9.3%), in the centre (5.3%; CI 3.0–9.0%) and in the South (22.5%; CI 16.7–29.6%), with more seropositive animals in the latter area ( p  

  • serological survey and risk factors of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus infection among owned cats in italy
    Parasitology Research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria Alfonsa Cavalera, Vito Colella, E. Brianti, Manuela Schnyder, Emily Katharina Gueldner, Tommaso Furlanello, Roberta Iatta, Christina Strube, Domenico Otranto

    Abstract:

    Feline lungworms affect the respiratory tract of domestic cats causing respiratory conditions of various degrees. In this study, we investigated the exposure of cats to feline lungworm infections by detecting antibodies in a large population of animals from several regions of Italy. Sera of 1087 domestic cats living in regions of the north (n = 700), the centre (n = 227) and the south (n = 160) of Italy were examined by a newly developed indirect ELISA conceived for detection of antibodies against the most frequently occurring feline lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Individual cat data (i.e., age, sex, neutering status and provenience) were analysed as potential risk factors for exposure to lungworm infections. Samples were additionally screened for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) proviral DNAs. Overall, 9% (98/1087; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.4-10.9%) of the animals tested seropositive to lungworm antibodies. Positive cats were identified in the north (7.1%; CI 5.5-9.3%), in the centre (5.3%; CI 3.0-9.0%) and in the South (22.5%; CI 16.7-29.6%), with more seropositive animals in the latter area (p < 0.05). The risk of lungworm infection in cats was significantly associated with age less than 6 months (i.e. 24.4%, p < 0.05) and FIV infection (p < 0.05). This large-scale serological survey confirms the exposure of cats to lungworm infections in Italy and that serological tests can be used to assess the distribution of lungworm infections in large populations of animals.

  • Mice as paratenic hosts of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus.
    Parasites & vectors, 2019
    Co-Authors: Vito Colella, Martin Knaus, Steffen Rehbein, Olimpia Lai, Carlo Cantile, Francesca Abramo, Domenico Otranto

    Abstract:

    Background
    Several species of nematodes included in the superfamily Metastrongyloidea are recognized agents of parasitic infections in felines. Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is the most prevalent species affecting the respiratory system of domestic cats. The route of infection in cats is supposed to be through ingestion of gastropod intermediate or paratenic hosts. However, because gastropods are not the preferred preys of cats, rodents were suggested to play an important role as paratenic hosts in the biological cycle of A. abstrusus and in the epidemiology of aelurostrongylosis.

Donato Traversa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fatal Pulmonary Hypertension and Right-Sided Congestive Heart Failure in a Kitten Infected with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 2020
    Co-Authors: Tommaso Vezzosi, Donato Traversa, Simone Morelli, Stefania Perrucci, Francesca Parisi, Michela Maestrini, Giulia Mennuni, Alessandro Poli

    Abstract:

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is considered the most important respiratory nematode of domestic cats worldwide. This parasite inhabits the alveoli, alveolar ducts, and bronchioles and causes a subacute to chronic respiratory clinical disease. Clinical signs may occur in domestic cats of any age, though they are more often described in young animals. Physical examination, echocardiography, thoracic radiography, pulmonary and cardiac pathological findings, classical, and molecular parasitological analysis of a six-month-old kitten referred at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Pisa (Italy) led to a diagnosis of parasitic bronchopneumonia caused by A. abstrusus, which was complicated by severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right-sided congestive heart failure (R-CHF) that caused the death of the animal. Cases of reversible PH associated with A. abstrusus infection have been seldom reported in cats. This is the first report of fatal PH and R-CHF in a kitten with clinical aelurostrongylosis.

  • Seroprevalence of antibodies against the cat lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus in cats from endemic areas of Italy.
    Veterinary parasitology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Angela Di Cesare, Donato Traversa, Paolo Emidio Crisi, Fabrizia Veronesi, Simone Morelli, Emily Katharina Gueldner, Christina Strube, Fabrizio Pampurini, Manuela Schnyder

    Abstract:

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) is a worldwide occurring lungworm causing verminous pneumonia in cats. To date the Baermann method is the most used procedure to diagnose A. abstrusus infection by isolating first stage larvae from faeces, though its sensitivity and specificity can be impaired by several factors. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against A. abstrusus has been recently developed as a diagnostic alternative. The present study evaluated the seroprevalence for A. abstrusus infection in cats from two endemic areas of Italy. Overall, 250 sera were sampled and tested for the presence of antibodies against A. abstrusus. Based on the results obtained from 20 cats proven to be infected by A. abstrusus using Baermann technique and molecular methods, and from 20 negative cats (Subset A), a cut off value of 0.347 optical density (OD) was determined, leading to a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 100%. Two-hundred and ten cats (142 and 68 from Abruzzo and Umbria regions, respectively) were included in Subset B (i.e. 202 negative by Baermann examination and 8 positive for Troglostrongylus brevior). Antibodies against A. abstrusus were detected in forty-five (21.4%, 95% CI: 16.1-27.6%) samples. This study confirms the occurrence of A. abstrusus in endemic areas of Italy and indicates that one-fifth of randomly selected cats have or had a lungworm infection with production of antibodies.

  • Mitochondrial haplotypes of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) from domestic and wild felids
    Parasitology Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Donato Traversa, Fabrizia Veronesi, Raffaella Iorio, Giulia Simonato, Anastasia Diakou, Federica Marcer, Angela Di Cesare

    Abstract:

    The lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is the most important respiratory parasite of domestic cats. Pulmonary aelurostrongylosis has been reported in wild felids, though unequivocally evidence of wildlife infection by A . abstrusus is scant. Recently, Troglostrongylus brevior , a lungworm usually infecting wild felids, has been described in domestic cats from Mediterranean areas. The present work evaluates the sequence variation of an informative region within the gene encoding the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of A . abstrusus and T . brevior , in order to provide novel information on the genetic make-up of these lungworms. Parasitic stages of A . abstrusus and T . brevior were collected from domestic and wild hosts (i.e., domestic cat, European wildcat, caracal, serval, and lion) from Italy, Greece, and South Africa. Five (HI-HV) and four (HI-HIV) haplotypes were recorded for A . abstrusus and T . brevior , respectively, mostly shared between domestic and wild felids in different geographical areas. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all haplotypes of A . abstrusus and T . brevior clustered as monophyletic groups with a strong nodal support, indicating that all haplotypes identified were distinct from each other. All sequence types represent two distinct species, A . abstrusus and T . brevior , and these genetic convergences are also detected within and among populations of these nematodes, irrespective of their hosts and geographical origin. The occurrence of A . abstrusus and T . brevior haplotypes in different hosts from the same regions and between different countries indicates that the same lungworm populations circulate in domestic and wild hosts under the same routes of transmission.