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Guarino R. Colli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal-performance curves and mean values of thermal traits.
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Luisa M. Diele-viegas, Guarino R. Colli, Laurie J. Vitt, Donald B. Miles, William E. Magnusson, Barry Sinervo, Fernanda P. Werneck, Juan C. Santos, Carla M. Sette, Gabriel H. O. Caetano
    Abstract:

    A) Chatogekko amazonicus; B) Gonatodes humeralis; C) Copeoglossum nigropunctatum; D) Norops fuscoauratus; E) Plica plica; F) Arthrosaura kockii; G) Arthrosaura reticulata; H) Leposoma percarinatum; I) Ameiva Ameiva; and J) Cnemidophorus cryptus. Gray shaded region shows the 95% confidence interval. Black points represent the results of individual tests at different body temperatures: 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, 40° and 43° for species classified as thermoregulators and 20°C, 25°C, 30°C and 35°C for shade-associated species classified as thermoconformers. Short vertical black lines indicate the number of trials at each temperature. Black lines at the curves’ extremes are the critical thermal minimum (CTmin) and critical thermal maximum (CTmax). Topt = optimal temperature; Tb = body temperature; Tpref = preferred temperature; VTmin = minimum voluntary temperature; VTmax = maximum voluntary temperature.

  • Cryptic diversity in South American Teiinae (Squamata, Teiidae) lizards
    Zoologica Scripta, 2013
    Co-Authors: Lilian G. Giugliano, Cristiano Nogueira, Paula Hanna Valdujo, Rosane G. Collevatti, Guarino R. Colli
    Abstract:

    Based on phylogenetic and molecular dating analyses of several species of Cnemidophorus and Ameiva, representing major groups of species of these two genera, we uncover a previously unrecognized Ameiva lineage, which includes described Cnemidophorus parecis from south-western Amazonia. We discuss the diagnosis of Ameiva and Cnemidophorus and the implications of the new taxonomic rearrangement of genera from Teiidae for the monophyly of Ameiva. Based on the conclusion of our analyses, we provide description of a new species named Ameiva jacuba from the central Brazilian Cerrado and a detailed diagnosis for the relocation of C. parecis to Ameiva. We do not adopt here recent taxonomic changes proposed for Teiidae and provide a discussion about them. Finally, based on molecular dating and the distribution of living species, we propose an evolutionary scenario for the origins of South American cis-Andean Ameiva lineages, associated with the topographic subdivision of the Cerrado region during Miocene marine introgressions.

  • ultrastructur eo fspermatozo ao fth elizar dAmeiva Ameiva wit hconsideration so npolymorphis mwithin th efamil yteiida e squamata
    , 2002
    Co-Authors: Loreny Gimenes Giugliano, R D Teixeira, Guarino R. Colli
    Abstract:

    ABSTRAC T Adetaile ddescriptio no fsper multrastructur eo fth elizar dAmeiv aameiv a(Teiidae )i sprovided. Matur espermatozo aar echaracterize dby :a depressed acrosom ea tth eanterio rportion ;a unilatera lridg ea tthe anterolatera lportion ;a nacrosom evesicl edivide dinto corte xan dmedulla ;medull adivide dint otw oregion swith differen telectron-densities ;paracrystallin esubacrosomal materia lwit hradia lorganizatio ni ntransvers esection ;a pointe dprenuclea rperforatorium ;a stopper-lik eperforatoriu mbas eplat etha tappear sembedde di nth esubacrosoma lmaterial ;th epresenc eo fa nepinuclea rlucen tzone surrounde db yit sow nmembrane ;a larg enuclea rrostrum ;roun dnuclea rshoulders ;a nuclea rspac ea tthe nucleu stip ;a bilatera lstratifie dlamina rstructure ;a centra ldens ebod ywithi nth eproxima lcentriole ;a short midpiece ;a naxonema lmidpiec eaxia lcomponent ;periphera lfiber s3 an d8 grossl yenlarge da tth eanterio rportion o faxoneme ;columna rmitochondri awit hlinea rcristae; soli ddens ebodie sarrange da sring so rspirals ;a triangular-shape dannulu si ntransvers esection ;a fibrous sheat hint oth emidpiece ;a thi nzon eo fcytoplas ma tthe anterio rportio no fth eprincipa lpiece ;an da sligh tdecreas ei ndiamete ro fth eprincipa lpiec eimmediatel yafter th eannulus .Comparison swit hCnemidophoru ssexlineatu san dMicrablepharu smaximilian ifaile dt oidentify uniqu esper multrastructur etrait so fTeiida eo rTeiioidea (Teiida e Gymnophthalmidae) .Hig hlevel so fpolymorphis mbetwee nAmeiv aan dCnemidophorus ,tw oclosely relate dgener ao fth efamil yTeiidae ,wer edetected ,suggestin gtha textensiv esamplin gwithi nsquamat efamilies i sessentia li fsper multrastructur edat aar et ob euse din phylogeneti canalyse sa tthi staxonomi clevel .J .Morphol. 253:26 4‐271 ,2002. ©200 2Wiley-Liss ,Inc.

Katherine E Horak – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Jenniffer Velasquez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Richard E Mauldin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of brodifacoum and diphacinone exposure on four species of reptiles tissue residue levels and survivorship
    Pest Management Science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Richard E Mauldin, Gary W Witmer, Susan A Shriner, Rachael S Moulton, Katherine E Horak
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Anticoagulant rodenticides are used worldwide to control pest rodent species. However, the risks posed to non‐target reptiles have not been well characterized. In this study, 46 giant Ameivas (Ameiva Ameiva), 39 boa constrictors (Boa constrictor), 33 wood turtles (Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima), and 47 green iguanas (Iguana iguana) were orally dosed with one of two levels of either diphacinone or brodifacoum anticoagulant in propylene glycol solutions. Dosages were derived using daily food intake (DFI) equations, converting DFI to an equivalent anticoagulant bait amount and gavaging the solution volume needed to deliver the quantity of anticoagulant in that amount of bait. Animals were dosed on days 0 and 7 and monitored for a further 7 days for signs of anticoagulant intoxication and differences in behaviors and postures. At necropsy on day 14, animals were examined for thoracic and abdominal bleeding, and both tissue and organ samples were taken for histology. Liver and whole‐body anticoagulant residues were assessed. RESULTS: No turtles or boas died due to anticoagulant exposure. However, anticoagulant intoxication was suspected in one iguana dosed with brodifacoum. A few treated Ameivas died but exhibited no hemorrhaging. Liver residue levels were higher than whole‐body remainder residue levels for all species. Unlike the other species, turtles had higher diphacinone residue levels than brodifacoum. CONCLUSION: Turtles and boas exhibited a relative insensitivity to diphacinone and brodifacoum, while the lizards appeared to be somewhat more sensitive to these compounds. This study provides data for future assessments of the risks to these species associated with anticoagulant use. Published 2019. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Laurie J. Vitt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal-performance curves and mean values of thermal traits.
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Luisa M. Diele-viegas, Guarino R. Colli, Laurie J. Vitt, Donald B. Miles, William E. Magnusson, Barry Sinervo, Fernanda P. Werneck, Juan C. Santos, Carla M. Sette, Gabriel H. O. Caetano
    Abstract:

    A) Chatogekko amazonicus; B) Gonatodes humeralis; C) Copeoglossum nigropunctatum; D) Norops fuscoauratus; E) Plica plica; F) Arthrosaura kockii; G) Arthrosaura reticulata; H) Leposoma percarinatum; I) Ameiva Ameiva; and J) Cnemidophorus cryptus. Gray shaded region shows the 95% confidence interval. Black points represent the results of individual tests at different body temperatures: 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, 40° and 43° for species classified as thermoregulators and 20°C, 25°C, 30°C and 35°C for shade-associated species classified as thermoconformers. Short vertical black lines indicate the number of trials at each temperature. Black lines at the curves’ extremes are the critical thermal minimum (CTmin) and critical thermal maximum (CTmax). Topt = optimal temperature; Tb = body temperature; Tpref = preferred temperature; VTmin = minimum voluntary temperature; VTmax = maximum voluntary temperature.

  • Niche segregation among sympatric Amazonian teiid lizards.
    Oecologia, 2000
    Co-Authors: Laurie J. Vitt, Shawn S. Sartorius, Teresa Avila-pires, Maria Cristina Esposito, Donald B. Miles
    Abstract:

    We examined standard niche axes (time, place, and food) for three sympatric teiid lizards in the Amazon rain forest. Activity times during the day were similar among species. Ameiva Ameiva were in more open microhabitats and had higher body temperatures compared with the two species of Kentropyx. Microhabitat overlaps were low and not significantly different from simulations based on Monte Carlo analysis. Grasshoppers, crickets, and spiders were important in the diets of all three species and many relatively abundant prey were infrequently eaten (e.g., ants). Dietary overlaps were most similar between the two species of Kentropyx even though microhabitat overlaps were relatively low. A Monte Carlo analysis on prey types revealed that dietary overlaps were higher at all ranks than simulated overlaps indicating that use of prey is not random. Although prey size was correlated with lizard body size, there were no species differences in adjusted prey size. A. Ameiva ate more prey items at a given body size than either species of Kentropyx. Body size varies among species, with A. Ameiva being the largest and K. altamazonica the smallest. The two species of Kentropyx are most distant morphologically, with A. Ameiva intermediate. The most distant species morphologically are the most similar in terms of prey types. A morphological analysis including 15 species from four genera revealed patterns of covariation that reflected phylogenetic affinities (i.e., taxonomic patterns are evident). A cluster analysis revealed that A. Ameiva, K. pelviceps, and K. altamazonica were in the same morphological group and that within that group, A. Ameiva differed from the rest of the species. In addition, K. pelviceps and K. altamazonica were distinguishable from other species of Kentropyx based on morphology.

  • Use of naturally and anthropogenically disturbed habitats in Amazonian rainforest by the teiid lizard Ameiva Ameiva
    Biological Conservation, 1999
    Co-Authors: Shawn S. Sartorius, Laurie J. Vitt, Guarino R. Colli
    Abstract:

    Abstract We studied the effects of natural and anthropogenic habitat disturbances on environmental temperatures and their consequent effects on thermoregulation and habitat use of Ameiva Ameiva in a complex habitat matrix of primary tropical forest and several types of disturbed forest in Amazonian Brazil. Data on Ameiva Ameiva from other regions in Brazil with habitats that have little canopy coverage are compared with data from rain forest sites to determine if activity of rain forest Ameiva is temporally or spatially limited by the thermal opportunities available in shaded environments. Ameiva Ameiva preferentially used disturbed habitats in rain forest regions. These sites had significantly higher environmental temperatures than did surrounding undisturbed rain forest. Environmental temperature distributions indicate that the closed canopy rain forest is a thermally marginal habitat for Ameiva Ameiva and that high temperatures resulting from forest clearing are likely to enable Ameiva Ameiva to increase foraging activity in adjacent forest edges above what is possible in the continuous interior forest. Ameiva Ameiva from rain forest, cerrado and savanna regions of Brazil had significantly lower body temperatures than Ameiva from caatinga, an open habitat type with little canopy coverage. This difference is probably due to high ambient temperatures and the high availability of basking sites in open habitats and suggests a thermal constraint on habitat use and time of activity for Ameiva in closed canopy habitats.