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The Experts below are selected from a list of 318 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

William J. Woods – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • HIV prevention in gay Bathhouses and sex clubs across the United States.
    Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999), 2020
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Jason Euren, Lance M. Pollack, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    Gay Bathhouses (including sex clubs) contributed to HIV prevention from the early days of the AIDS epidemic, but the extent to which prevention interventions are implemented in Bathhouses is unknown. Using telephone survey methodology, Bathhouse managers provided data about HIV prevention in their Bathhouses. All the Bathhouses provided free condoms, and nearly all displayed educational posters in public areas and had informational pamphlets available for patrons. A few of the Bathhouses offered outreach services and counseling services. Almost all promoted testing for HIV/sexually transmitted infection (which included providing information about where to get tested), and 75.5% had HIV testing programs in their venues. Most of the HIV testing programs were started during the past 5 years, initiated by the Bathhouse management or a community agency, and operated by community-based agencies. About one third of the programs offered rapid HIV testing. The results of the telephone survey revealed that all the Bathhouses engaged in prevention and many offered a wide range of prevention services, suggesting that managers have embraced the issue of HIV and collaborated in bringing prevention to high-risk men. The absence of studies evaluating these prevention efforts remains a concern and an obstacle for efficient use of the prevention resources.

  • Bathhouse distribution of HIV self-testing kits reaches diverse, high-risk population.
    Aids Care-psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of Aids\ hiv, 2016
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Sheri A Lippman, Emily Agnew, Scott Carroll, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    We distributed free OraQuick In-home HIV Test® kits to men at a gay Bathhouse. Men were systematically selected to receive a coupon, which could be redeemed that night for an HIV self-testing kit. Those offered the coupon were asked to take an 11-item survey. About 181 men received coupons, of whom 92 (51%) accepted the coupon, and 61 (66%) men redeemed the coupon. Those who redeemed test kits and completed a survey (n = 53) were more ethnically diverse (χ(2) = 100.69, p 

  • Bathhouse distribution of hiv self testing kits reaches diverse high risk population
    Aids Care-psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of Aids\ hiv, 2016
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Sheri A Lippman, Emily Agnew, Scott Carroll, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    We distributed free OraQuick In-home HIV Test® kits to men at a gay Bathhouse. Men were systematically selected to receive a coupon, which could be redeemed that night for an HIV self-testing kit. Those offered the coupon were asked to take an 11-item survey. About 181 men received coupons, of whom 92 (51%) accepted the coupon, and 61 (66%) men redeemed the coupon. Those who redeemed test kits and completed a survey (n = 53) were more ethnically diverse (χ(2) = 100.69, p < .01) than those receiving the coupon. More than half had not tested in the past 6 months (50%) or never tested (7%). Importantly, men who had never tested or who last tested more than 6 months ago were among those most likely to take the free test kit. We found Bathhouse distribution could reach a population of men who have sex with men most in need of improved access to HIV testing. Future studies should consider means of improved follow-up and linkage to care for those who test positive.

Diane Binson – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • HIV prevention in gay Bathhouses and sex clubs across the United States.
    Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999), 2020
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Jason Euren, Lance M. Pollack, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    Gay Bathhouses (including sex clubs) contributed to HIV prevention from the early days of the AIDS epidemic, but the extent to which prevention interventions are implemented in Bathhouses is unknown. Using telephone survey methodology, Bathhouse managers provided data about HIV prevention in their Bathhouses. All the Bathhouses provided free condoms, and nearly all displayed educational posters in public areas and had informational pamphlets available for patrons. A few of the Bathhouses offered outreach services and counseling services. Almost all promoted testing for HIV/sexually transmitted infection (which included providing information about where to get tested), and 75.5% had HIV testing programs in their venues. Most of the HIV testing programs were started during the past 5 years, initiated by the Bathhouse management or a community agency, and operated by community-based agencies. About one third of the programs offered rapid HIV testing. The results of the telephone survey revealed that all the Bathhouses engaged in prevention and many offered a wide range of prevention services, suggesting that managers have embraced the issue of HIV and collaborated in bringing prevention to high-risk men. The absence of studies evaluating these prevention efforts remains a concern and an obstacle for efficient use of the prevention resources.

  • Bathhouse distribution of HIV self-testing kits reaches diverse, high-risk population.
    Aids Care-psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of Aids\ hiv, 2016
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Sheri A Lippman, Emily Agnew, Scott Carroll, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    We distributed free OraQuick In-home HIV Test® kits to men at a gay Bathhouse. Men were systematically selected to receive a coupon, which could be redeemed that night for an HIV self-testing kit. Those offered the coupon were asked to take an 11-item survey. About 181 men received coupons, of whom 92 (51%) accepted the coupon, and 61 (66%) men redeemed the coupon. Those who redeemed test kits and completed a survey (n = 53) were more ethnically diverse (χ(2) = 100.69, p 

  • Bathhouse distribution of hiv self testing kits reaches diverse high risk population
    Aids Care-psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of Aids\ hiv, 2016
    Co-Authors: William J. Woods, Sheri A Lippman, Emily Agnew, Scott Carroll, Diane Binson

    Abstract:

    We distributed free OraQuick In-home HIV Test® kits to men at a gay Bathhouse. Men were systematically selected to receive a coupon, which could be redeemed that night for an HIV self-testing kit. Those offered the coupon were asked to take an 11-item survey. About 181 men received coupons, of whom 92 (51%) accepted the coupon, and 61 (66%) men redeemed the coupon. Those who redeemed test kits and completed a survey (n = 53) were more ethnically diverse (χ(2) = 100.69, p < .01) than those receiving the coupon. More than half had not tested in the past 6 months (50%) or never tested (7%). Importantly, men who had never tested or who last tested more than 6 months ago were among those most likely to take the free test kit. We found Bathhouse distribution could reach a population of men who have sex with men most in need of improved access to HIV testing. Future studies should consider means of improved follow-up and linkage to care for those who test positive.

Wen-chien Ko – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • trends of hiv and sexually transmitted infections estimated hiv incidence and risky sexual behaviors among gay Bathhouse attendees in taiwan 2004 2008
    Aids and Behavior, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nai-ying Ko, Wen-chien Ko, Jui Ling Chang, Chia-ming Chang, Chienching Hung, Fan Chen Tseng, Bo Jie Chen, Shainn Wei Wang

    Abstract:

    Five serial cross-sectional surveys were done at eight gay Bathhouses in Taiwan to investigate the trends of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and estimated HIV incidence between 2004 and 2008. Bathhouse attendees completed a questionnaire and tests for HIV, syphilis, hepatitis C virus, and amoebiasis. Twenty-nine (38.6%) were identified as having recent HIV-1 infections. There was a significant increase in HIV incidence, from 7.8% in 2004 to 15% in 2007 (χ2 = 17.59, P-trend <0.001). Recreational drug use is the primary risk behavior. Comprehensive screening programs in gay Bathhouses for early detection of HIV and STIs are important.

  • effects of structural intervention on increasing condom availability and reducing risky sexual behaviours in gay Bathhouse attendees
    Aids Care-psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of Aids\ hiv, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nai-ying Ko, Jui Ling Chang, Chia-ming Chang, Chienching Hung, Hsuting Chang, Wen-chien Ko

    Abstract:

    Abstract The study purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a structural intervention in reducing unprotected sexual behaviours, increasing condom accessibility and their relationship to the prevalence of HIV infection and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in gay Bathhouse attendees. A quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent control group for comparison was conducted at nine gay Bathhouses in Taiwan from 2004 to 2006. A structural intervention designed to increase condom distribution and accessibility inside the Bathhouses was implemented at one Bathhouse in each city. Bathhouse attendees were invited to complete a questionnaire and to be screened for HIV infection and STIs. Of 632 study participants, 270 were surveyed six months after the intervention was conducted. At the time of follow-up after controlling for baseline data, patrons attending Bathhouses for which intervention was performed were more likely to report accessing condoms inside Bathhouses than those attending control bathho…

  • CONDOM AVAILABILITY IN TAIWANESE GAY BathhouseS : THE RIGHT THINGS IN THE WRONG PLACES
    Aids Education and Prevention, 2008
    Co-Authors: Nai-ying Ko, Jui Ling Chang, Chia-ming Chang, Wen-chien Ko

    Abstract:

    Gay Bathhouses were identified as public venues where men having sex with men are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors. This study applied Binson and Woods’s (Journal of Homosexuality, 44, 2003) theoretical framework of risk environment/Bathhouse setting to (a) describe four domains of Bathhouse environments, (b) investigate condom availability in Bathhouses, and (c) identify barriers of condom distribution. An ethnographic study was conducted at eight gay Bathhouses in Taiwan, including environmental observations, interviews of 16 staff members, and self–administered questionnaires of 409 Bathhouse patrons. Condoms were provided upon request in eight Bathhouses. Environmental observations showed a poor match between the places where condoms were distributed and where men had sex. Cost and police harassment were two barriers of condom distribution in Bathhouses. Our findings highlight the importance of the extension of condom distribution at places where men have sex in gay Bathhouses.